Catalog 2014-2015

Course Descriptions

ACC 099 Non-Credit Service Requirement for Accounting Majors

All accounting majors must fulfill a 30-hour non-credit service requirement as a condition of graduation.  Service opportunities are provided through the VITA tax assistance program, through the accounting honor society Beta Alpha Psi, through other accounting and business organizations and through the UT Office of Student Leadership and Engagement (OSLE). Accounting majors should sign up at the beginning of their junior year with OSLE to establish a record for a co-curricular transcript. Report and substantiate all service hours to build your co-curricular transcript. Submit your co-curricular transcript to the accounting department chair 60 days before graduation. The chair will approve and submit to the registrar your successful completion of the service requirement.

Credit Hours: 0

ACC 202 Financial Accounting Information

ACC 202 focuses on the external financial reporting of enterprises. The course examines the creation, flow and analysis of enterprise financial information, including the income statement, balance sheet, statement of retained earnings and cash flow statement in accordance with accepted accounting principles. Students conduct introductory Internet research on published company financial information.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or higher (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225) plus 12 earned credit hours.

ACC 203 Managerial Accounting

ACC 203 focuses on the concepts, systems, procedures and decision models that help managers analyze, interpret and improve business results. Managerial accounting encompasses various systems for calculating the cost of a product or service; tools for the evaluation of business segments; models for making decisions concerning a variety of special decisions; planning and budgeting for operations and capital items; and exposure to ethical norms and dilemmas in the context of accounting and finance. The course includes Excel spreadsheet applications.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202, MAT 150 or higher (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ACC 304 Cost Accounting

ACC 304 helps students apply cost accounting methods in a variety of organizational business settings by developing accounting information that is timely, relevant and useful for formulating strategy, making non-routine decisions and planning and controlling operations. Topics covered include cost accumulation, assignment and behavior; planning, budgeting, evaluating and controlling operations; and tactical decision-making.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202 and ACC 203, MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225), QMB 210.

ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting I

ACC 320 expands the student's understanding of generally accepted accounting principles. The theory and methodology covered are the FASB's conceptual framework, FASB codification, international financial reporting standards, the accounting process, financial statements, time value of money, current and non-current assets and cash flows.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225) and a grade of "C" or higher in ACC 202.

ACC 351 Accounting Information Systems

ACC 351 is a pragmatic study of accounting information systems. The course covers accounting systems concepts, systems documentation, transaction processing systems, database systems, e-accounting systems, accounting software systems, enterprise systems, systems acquisition/development, systems security/control, and emerging issues related to accounting systems and their supporting information technologies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202, ACC 203, ACC 320, ITM 220.

ACC 352 Federal Tax Accounting I

ACC 352 covers the U.S. federal taxation system concentrating on issues of individual taxation. There is significant emphasis on research tools and technology in the taxation field. Students complete a volunteer tax clinic requiring some evening or weekend commitment. Successful completion of the volunteer project fulfills the ACC 099 service requirement.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ACC 202.

ACC 401 Auditing and Attestation

ACC 401 covers generally accepted auditing and attestation standards, professional ethics, auditing and attestation reporting requirements and objectives. The course includes topics on the auditing profession, audit reports, professional ethics, audit responsibilities and objectives, audit evidence, audit planning, materiality and risk, and other assurance and non-assurance services.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 351, QMB 210; corequisite ACC 420.

ACC 405 Advanced Financial Accounting

ACC 405 covers long-term investments, emphasizing equity investments, corporate combinations (mergers and acquisitions, including acquisitions accomplished in a series of steps) and the preparation of consolidated financial statements for wholly owned and partially owned subsidiaries, including the elimination of intercompany profits and losses. Partnership accounting also is addressed for income/loss sharing, ownership changes and liquidation.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 420.

ACC 420 Intermediate Accounting II

ACC 420 expands the student's study of generally accepted accounting principles. The theory and methodology on liabilities, stockholders' equity, dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pensions, leases and accounting changes are covered. Additionally, students compare and apply the international financial reporting standards on these topics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225), ITM 220 and a grade of "C" or higher in ACC 320.

ACC 431 Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

ACC 431 introduces the underlying accounting concepts, methods of accounting and financial statement preparation for state and local governments and other not-for-profit organizations such as charities, universities and colleges, and health care organizations. Accounting standards and procedures for these types of organizations are significantly different from those of for-profit organizations, and this course provides the student with the ability to prepare, read and understand financial statements of not-for-profit entities.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320.

ACC 453 Federal Tax Accounting II

ACC 453 examines laws, regulations and court opinions governing taxation of corporations, partnerships and estates. There is significant exposure to tax research tools. Students complete a volunteer tax clinic requiring some evening or weekend commitment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 352.

ACC 460 International Accounting

ACC 460 provides a pragmatic study on international accounting and reporting issues facing corporations required to follow international financial reporting standards (IFRS). The course covers the application IFRS including the preparation of the financial statements and specialized supporting calculations related to inventory, PPE, liabilities, equity, investments and cash flows. Differences between the application of IFRS and GAAP will be emphasized. This class is required for International Business-Accounting majors. This class is an elective for accounting majors.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 420.

ACC 490 Accounting Internship

ACC 490 examines practical aspects of accounting through a paid accounting internship at a firm under supervision of faculty and firm representatives. This course may not be used to satisfy major requirements. It may be repeated for credit beyond 124 hours. Approval of the Accounting Department Chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with at least a 2.25 overall GPA; completion of four accounting classes at or above the 300 level with a 3.0 average in those classes.

ACC 495 Special Topics in Accounting

ACC 495 is offered at the discretion of the accounting department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ACC 499 Independent Study in Accounting

A readings or independent studies course taken for variable credit. May not be used as an elective in the accounting major.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and associate dean.

ACC 500 Essentials of Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 500 examines the accounting principles and techniques involved in the creation and interpretation of key external accounting financial statements, and covers key topics in managerial accounting techniques to support management decision-making.

Credit Hours: 2

ACC 604 Advanced Management Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 604 provides students with a pragmatic study of advanced management accounting concepts and practices relating to strategic cost management, performance management, and management accounting control with emphasis on behavioral, social, and sustainability implications.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 304 or equivalent and admission to the graduate program.

ACC 605 Advanced Financial Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 605 covers long-term investments, emphasizing equity investments, corporate combinations (mergers and acquisitions, including acquisitions accomplished in a series of steps), and the preparation of consolidated financial statements for wholly owned and partially owned subsidiaries, including the elimination of intercompany profits and losses. Partnership accounting also is addressed for income/loss sharing, ownership changes and liquidation.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 420.

ACC 610 Accounting and Value Creation

For graduate students only (to be taken as one of the first three MBA courses).  This course applies contemporary financial and managerial accounting concepts and techniques to examine how organizations create value for stakeholders.  The financial accounting component involves in depth analysis of external financial reports and introduces the rudiments of equity valuation.  The managerial accounting module focuses on decision-making as it relates to planning, organizing, and controlling operating activities.  Consideration is also given to business ethics and global issues relevant to the topic areas.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500, FIN 500.

ACC 620 Financial Accounting Theory

For graduate students only. ACC 620 explores financial accounting theory and policy, as well as the history of the accounting profession and financial accounting standard-setting. The conceptual framework, existing accounting standards and empirical research are used to expand the students' understanding of the economic, political, social and ethical issues related to accounting policy decisions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 420.

ACC 625 Accounting Research and Analytics

For graduate students only.  This course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills needed by ALL students entering the accounting profession (see AICPA Core Competency Framework).  These skills include critical thinking and problem solving, decision modeling, research, communication and reporting, and leveraging technology. 
Credit Hours: 4

ACC 630 Audit & Control of Information Systems

For graduate students only. Prerequisites: ACC 351 or equivalent.  This course provides students with a pragmatic study of information systems (IS) audit/control and its significance for contemporary accounting practice.  The course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of IT governance, IS risk management, IS resource control, IS security management, and IS audit processes with emphasis on accounting compliance and assurance concerns. Prevailing and/or emerging issues relating to IS audit/control are also explored with consideration for the evolving responsibilities of accounting professionals in an IT-based control environment.  

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 351 or equivalent.

ACC 631 Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 631 introduces the underlying accounting concepts, methods of accounting and financial statement preparation for state and local governments and other not-for-profit organizations such as charities, universities and colleges, and health care organizations. Accounting standards and procedures for these types of organizations are significantly different from those of for-profit organizations, and this course provides the student with the ability to prepare, read, understand and analyze financial statements of not-for-profit entities.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320.

ACC 635 Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

For graduate students only. ACC 635 exposes students to the background and nature of ethical decision-making from personal, professional and societal points of view. Students learn how to recognize ethical issues in business, to reason effectively using higher-order moral thinking skills, to identify the elements of good governance and to perform risk assessment from business and assurance perspectives. Topics include ethical decision-making, why ethical decision-making is important to professional careers in accounting, the role of an ethical culture in business within the context of corporate governance and how risk assessment aids professional accountants.

Credit Hours: 4

ACC 645 Business Analysis and Valuation

For graduate students only. ACC 645 explores the principles, metrics and techniques used to estimate the value of firms, and critically examines various value-building strategies. The course utilizes both free cash flow and economic profit models to value a publicly held company as a semester project. The course includes significant spreadsheet and Internet research components as well as a team and oral presentation emphasis.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 for MSF students; ACC 610 for MBA students; 12 earned graduate credits for MSA students

ACC 650 Nonprofit Management and Innovation: Managing for Performance

For graduate students only. ACC 650 develops financial and evaluation tools for nonprofit executives. It includes an overview of financial reporting guidelines and techniques; accounting methods, systems and special topics related to nonprofit organizations; cost behaviors, measurements and analysis; the budgeting process and preparation of budgets; use of financial statement analysis; and the roles of executive officers and directors in financial management and internal controls.

Credit Hours: 3

ACC 653 Federal Tax Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 653 examines laws, regulations and court opinions governing taxation of corporations, partnerships and estates. There is significant exposure to tax research tools. Students complete a volunteer tax clinic requiring some evening or weekend commitment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 352.

ACC 655 Fraud Examination

For graduate students only. ACC 655 applies fraud examination methodology to the three major types of occupational fraud: corruption, asset misappropriation and fraudulent financial statements. Fraud examination is a methodology for resolving allegations of fraud from inception to disposition. This methodology covers topics related to the prevention, detection and investigation of fraud.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500.

ACC 660 International Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 660 provides a pragmatic study on international accounting and reporting issues facing multinational corporations. Topics include worldwide accounting diversity, the international financial reporting standards (IFRS), foreign currency transactions and hedging exchange risks, translation of foreign currency financial statements and international transfer pricing.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 420.

ACC 680 Contemporary Issues in Accounting

This course focuses on evaluating current and emerging issues and topics relating to accounting constructs, policy issues, and professional concerns using accounting theory.  This integrative capstone experience requires students to apply skills and knowledge gained from prior coursework.  Students will demonstrate their professional knowledge, professional competency, and professional responsibility through cases, projects, and oral presentations.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 625, ACC 635, and at least twenty-four total earned hours in the MSA program.

ACC 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Approval by the Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies, college internship coordinator and associate dean.

ACC 695 Special Topics in Accounting

A course offered at the discretion of the Accounting department. Subjects may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ACC 699 Independent Study in Accounting

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in accounting.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA, ACC 610, FIN 611 and written permission of the department chair.

AFR 1101 Foundations of the United States Air Force Part 1

Introduction to the Air Force in a contemporary world through a study of its total force structure and mission.

Credit Hours: 1

AFR 1120 Foundations of the United States Air Force Part 2

A study of the strategic offensive and defensive forces, general purpose forces and aerospace support forces that make up the Air Force today.

Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2001 Air Force Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory is required for each of the aerospace studies courses. It meets one hour and 45 minutes per week. Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized cadet corps with a progression of experiences designed to develop each student's leadership potential. Leadership Laboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies; drill and ceremonies; career opportunities in the Air Force; and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. Students develop their leadership potential in a practical laboratory, which typically includes field trips to Air Force installations.

Credit Hours: 0

AFR 2130 The Evolution of USAF Aerospace Power Part 1

A study of air power from balloons and dirigibles through the jet age. Emphasis is on the employment of air power in WWI and WWII, and how it affected the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine.

Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2140 The Evolution of USAF Aerospace Power Part 2

An historical review of air power employment in military and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives. Emphasis is on the period from after WWII to the present.

Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2940 Basic Aerospace Internship

Internship credit is given to any student who successfully completes a four-week Field Training (FT) encampment. FT is a mandatory program for all individuals seeking an Air Force officer commission through AFROTC. The program is designed to develop military leadership and discipline, provide Air Force orientation and motivation, and determine potential for entry into the Professional Officer Course en route to a career as an Air Force officer. FT is conducted at Maxwell AFB, Montgomery, AL. FT attendance is selective based upon a national competitive boarding process and the needs of the Air Force — not all students are selected for FT. To successfully complete FT, the student must complete at least 70 percent of the required training according to the Field Training syllabus, and not be absent from the FT encampment for more than 72 consecutive hours. The student also must pass the physical fitness test, attain a minimum 70 percent academic average and not be rated as "unsatisfactory" in any single performance factor block (sub-area) or receive an overall score of "unsatisfactory" on the AFROTC Form 70, Field Training Performance Report.

Credit Hours: 3

AFR 3220 Air Force Leadership and Management I

An integrated management course emphasizing the individual as a manager in an Air Force milieu. Individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communication and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for development of the junior officer's professional skills as an Air Force officer (officership). The basic managerial processes involving decision-making, utilization of analytic aids in planning, organizing and controlling in a changing environment are emphasized as necessary professional concepts.

Credit Hours: 3

AFR 3231 Air Force Leadership and Management II

A continuation of the study of Air Force advancement and leadership. Concentration is on organizational and personal values, management of forces in change, organizational power, politics, and managerial strategy and tactics discussed within the context of the military organization. Actual Air Force cases are used to enhance the learning and communication processes.

Credit Hours: 3

AFR 4201 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty 1

A study of the armed forces as an integral element of society, with emphases on American civil-military relations and the context within which U.S. defense policy is formulated and implemented. Special themes include societal attitudes toward the military and the role of the professional military leader-manager in a democratic society.

Credit Hours: 3

AFR 4211 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty 2

A continuation of the study of the armed forces in contemporary American society. Concentration is on the requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; political, economic and social constraints on the national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness; the variables involved in the formulation and implementation of national security policy; and military justice and its relationship to civilian law.

Credit Hours: 3

ARA 101 Elementary Arabic I

Beginning Arabic with emphasis on the cultural context in which Arabic is used. Emphasis is on achieving a full mastery of Arabic sounds and the Arabic writing system, as well as basic proficiency in everyday conversational Arabic, including greetings and other common expressions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. Students who have previously completed two or more years of Arabic may not enroll in ARA 101 for credit except by written permission of the instructor.

ARA 102 Elementary Arabic II

Beginning Arabic with emphasis on the cultural context in which Arabic is used. Emphasis is on achieving a full mastery of Arabic sounds and the Arabic writing system, as well as basic proficiency in everyday conversational Arabic, including greetings and other common expressions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 101 or equivalent skills is a prerequisite for ARA 102. Students who have previously completed two or more years of Arabic may not enroll in ARA 101 for credit except by written permission of the instructor.

ARA 201 Intermediate Arabic I

Develops a greater understanding of the Arabic language and the diversity of cultures in the Arabic-speaking world, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 102 or equivalent skills.

ARA 202 Intermediate Arabic II

Develops a greater understanding of the Arabic language and the diversity of cultures in the Arabic-speaking world, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 102 or equivalent skills.

ARM 200 Arts Administration and Leadership

This course surveys arts administration and leadership best practices in the visual arts, theatre, dance and music industries. Topics covered include best practices in administration; marketing, public relations and programming; financial management, accounting and fundraising; advocacy and cultural policy; entrepreneurship and leadership; and the not-for-profit and for-profit sectors.

Credit Hours: 4

ARM 480 Seminar in Arts Administration and Leadership

The content of this seminar varies, as announced in class timetable. May be repeated for additional credit if content varies.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

Completion of 6 credit hours of ARM 200 and 498, and permission of arts management adviser.

ARM 498 Internship

Students get on-the-job experience in fine arts management agencies. The Tampa Arts Council, Plant Museum and Scarfone/Hartley Galleries are representative of internship sites. The internship should be taken throughout the sophomore, junior and senior years, with 2 credit hours for seniors to combine with ARM 480, Senior Seminar.

Credit Hours: 1-15

Prerequisites

ARM 200 and consent of instructor.

ART 101 Form and Idea

A non studio-oriented course designed to increase an overall understanding of art. The course concentrates on the various social and historical factors that have affected art throughout time. Issues examined include why art is created; how it is used; how it affects us, collectively and individually; how it is formed; and the value it has for enriching our lives. May not be used to satisfy major or minor degree requirements in art.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (A)

ART 153 Beginning Drawing

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces traditional problems in drafting and pictorial organization. Involves development of pictorial form and space by line and value through a variety of media.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 154 Figure Drawing

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces problems in pictorial organization, using the human figure and other organic forms as reference.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 200 Handbuilding

An introductory studio/performance-oriented course designed to acquaint the student with the principles of ceramics as a medium for aesthetic expression. Emphasis is given to hand-building techniques, surface enrichment, ceramic history, ceramic geology, aesthetics and conceptual development.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 201 Introduction to Painting

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces students to various aspects of painting in both representational and abstract forms. Traditional and contemporary painting techniques and concepts are surveyed. Emphasis is placed on color theory. Perceptual training by means of still-life exercises, problem-solving assignments and freedom to use the imagination are also stressed.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 202 Beginning Sculpture

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on sculptural form and problems through the sculptural use of classic and contemporary materials and methods. Emphasizes the separate nature of carved and modeled forms and the value of the character of the material on the final work.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 203 Beginning Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on printmaking as an expressive medium through exploration of form and pictorial organization in dry point, relief and intaglio printmaking.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 204 Beginning Design

A studio/performance-oriented course covering the fundamental principles of visual organization. Emphasizes two-dimensional design and the use and theory of color.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 205 Intermediate Sculpture

A studio/performance-oriented course that is a continuation of ART 202.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 207 Beginning Digital Illustration

A studio/performance-oriented course that provides an introduction and investigation into illustration techniques, principals, concepts and styles applied to both traditional and digital illustration. This course involves the correlation between materials and themes. Emphasis is on studying existing illustration styles and techniques.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 208 Beginning Photography

A studio/performance-oriented course offering an introduction to materials and techniques of photography with an emphasis on observation and visualization.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 210 Beginning Digital Arts

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces various electronic and digital tools for use in creating artistic projects. Covers the history, evolution and theory of relevant technology in order to provide context for the hardware and software used in the class. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 211 Art and Technology

Art and Technology is a course conceived to provide a context for the development of art and its interrelations with technology. Students examine the definition of multimedia and its evolution toward what is currently known as hypermedia. Special emphasis is placed on the creation and transformation of technology used in the 20th century, such as radio, television, computers, the Internet and networked environments. Developments are related to historic art movements.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (A)

ART 213 3D Modeling and Texturing

A studio/performance-oriented course: An investigation into 3D computer modeling, surface texturing and virtual lighting for the purpose creating digital reproductions of still images, including an investigation into the concept of virtual and artificial reality imagery. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 217 Beginning 3-D Animation

A studio/performance-oriented course that gives an introduction to three-dimensional computer animation, exploring the basic techniques of modeling and animation. The course also includes necessary aspects of texture mapping, deformation, motion control, lighting, cameras and rendering. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 221 Ceramic Sculpture

An introductory studio/performance-oriented course designed to acquaint students with the principles of creating ceramic sculpture. Emphasis is given to the specific construction techniques relevant for ceramic sculptural creation, surface enrichment, incorporation of mixed-media, glazing, ceramic geology, mold-making, a study of historical and contemporary ceramic sculpture, aesthetic criticism and conceptual idea development.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 222 Wheel Throwing

An introductory studio/performance-oriented course designed to acquaint students with the principles of wheel thrown ceramics as a technique for aesthetic expression. Emphasis is given to the development of wheel throwing techniques, surface enrichment and glazing, ceramic geology, a study of historical and contemporary wheel thrown ceramics, aesthetic criticism and conceptual idea development.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 223 Terra Cotta and Raku

An introductory studio/performance-oriented course designed to acquaint students with the ancient and modern techniques and principles of working with terra cotta (earthenware) and the Japanese process of raku as media for aesthetic expression. Emphasis is given to the specific handbuilding techniques relevant for working with terra cotta and the raku process. Surface enrichment, glazing, ceramic geology, a study of historical and contemporary terra cotta and raku, methods of firing, aesthetic criticism and conceptual idea development are also included.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 224 Murals, Tiles and Mosaics

An introductory studio/performance-oriented course designed to acquaint students with the principles of producing and installing ceramic murals, tiles and mosaics as a medium for aesthetic expression. Emphasis is given to the specific techniques used to produce ceramic murals, tiles and mosaics; surface enrichment; incorporation of mixed-media; glazing; ceramic geology; a study of historical and contemporary ceramic murals, tiles and mosaics; installation; mounting; aesthetic criticism; and conceptual idea development.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 231 Relief Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on printmaking as an expressive medium through the exploration of form and pictorial organization in all relief printmaking techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 232 Intaglio Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on printmaking as an expressive medium through the exploration of form and pictorial organization in all intaglio printmaking techniques, including dry point and etching.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 238 Animation I

Teaches the technique of animation as a visual medium, and enables students (regardless of major) to design, script, write, direct and communicate concepts through animation. Emphasizes art, history, movement, audio design and writing. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the communication or film and media arts majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 241

ART 250 Observational Painting

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces students to skills and elements of observational painting. Still-life and the figure provide the subject matter for observing color, light, form and space. The course explores the power and energy of composition and investigates the many painterly properties of oil paint. Through slide presentations and visits to local museums and galleries, students extend their knowledge of historical and contemporary art based on observation.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 251 Mixed-Media Painting

A studio/performance-oriented course aimed at students interested in working in multiple mediums. It is designed to explore beginning interests in drawing, painting, photography and 3-D forms as an investigation into the contemporary practice of combining artistic media. The course emphasizes experimentation and exploration of new materials, new processes and new ways to put things together. Students will further their technical ability while thinking conceptually about where painting lies today.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 153, ART 201, ART 203, ART 204.

ART 252 Experimental Painting

A studio/performance-oriented course intended to question the limits and boundaries of painting as a creative medium, stressing investigation in media and technique. Issues of traditional as well as nontraditional aspects of painting are brought into light in the context of a contemporary discourse. Experimentation in concept and media will be encouraged.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 153, ART 201, ART 203, ART 204.

ART 268 History Survey I

A critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts from the Prehistoric era to the Gothic period. Emphasis is given to the social and cultural influences that affected the development of art in Western civilizations.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 269 History Survey II

A critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the social and cultural influences that affected the development of art in Western civilizations.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 270 Primitive

A critical and analytical study of significant primitive historical and prehistoric works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

ART 271 Pre-Columbian

A critical and analytical study of significant pre-Columbian works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

ART 272 Near East

A critical and analytical study of ancient Middle Eastern historical works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

ART 273 Greco-Roman

A critical and analytical study of the ancient Mediterranean area and significant Greco-Roman works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (A)

ART 274 Medieval

A critical and analytical study of significant Medieval works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 275 Renaissance

A critical and analytical study of significant Renaissance works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 276 Baroque-Rococo

A critical and analytical study of significant Baroque and Rococo works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 277 Modern Art

A critical and analytical study of 20th-century painting, sculpture, photography and architecture with an emphasis on the conditions and circumstances that caused them to evolve to their present states.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 278 Far East

A critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts of the Far Eastern cultures of India, China and Japan.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

ART 279 Neo-Classical-Modern Origins

A critical and analytic study of neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism and post-impressionism including influences on the development of contemporary Western art, with specific references to painting, sculpture and architecture.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 281 History of Graphic Design

A critical and analytical study of the history of graphic design, from the 14th century to present with major references to movable type, the Renaissance, art nouveau, modern, post-modern and digital eras.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

ART 292 Art Immersion: Travel Course

This is a travel course designed for students interested in experiencing and engaging in a vibrant art scene. On location, students visit galleries, museums and the working studios of prominent artists. Prior to the trip or on return, during the seminar portion of the course, these visits are contextualized through readings, discussion and other assignments. Possible destinations include New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Seattle and other sites. (Travel fees vary depending on location.)

Credit Hours: 1

ART 298 Junior Seminar: Portfolio and Professional Practices

This is a required course for all art majors that focuses on career preparation and professional development for visual artists. It presents a wide variety of professional skills such as goal setting; professional ethics; portfolio basics and imaging strategies; writing cover letters, artist's statements and gallery proposals; exhibiting in galleries, museums and alternative spaces; self-initiated projects and exhibitions; networking and public relations; applying for grants and residencies; applying for internships, jobs and graduate schools; and locating helpful resources. ART 298 is a prerequisite for participation in the biannual Junior Review and ART 498 Senior Seminar.

Credit Hours: 2

ART 300 Advanced Ceramics

A studio/performance-oriented course designed to provide a more intensive investigation into the ceramic art medium. Emphasis is given to the development of a more personalized aesthetic approach, kiln firing and glaze development.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

Any two 200-level ceramics courses, or permission of the instructor.

ART 302 Advanced Sculpture

A studio/performance-oriented course designed to give intensified experience in sculptural form with emphasis on individual experimentation and competence in one or more sculptural materials.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 303 Advanced Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course that is a continuation of ART 203.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 304 Advanced Drawing

A studio/performance-oriented course that is a continuation of ART 153 and 154, with emphasis on the relationship of advanced principles to pictorial organization and drawing as a final form.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 305 Introduction to Graphic Design

A studio/performance-oriented course that is an introductory study of the creative processes associated with the graphic design field. Emphasis on creative problem-solving, basic design principles and the integration of type and imagery as applied to realistic graphic design problems. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 153 or ART 154, ART 204, ART 210

ART 306 Graphic Design II

A studio/performance-oriented course that emphasizes the development of the creative process as applied to design problem-solving. Focus is on the development of ideas and the tools used to execute design solutions. Subjects covered include print advertising, brochures, logotypes, signage, packaging and illustration, and how each ties in with marketing strategy. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 305, ART 309

ART 308 Advanced Photography

A studio/performance-oriented course designed to increase students' technical knowledge and ability for individual expression. Problems involve multiple imagery, serial photography and other exercises to increase students' creative potential. Encourages experimentation with larger format as well as other aspects of the photographic medium.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

ART 309 Typography

A studio/performance-oriented course designed to increase students' understanding of typography as it relates to visual communication and graphical expression while exploring both traditional and nontraditional forms.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 305

ART 310 Advanced Digital Arts

A studio/performance-oriented course that is a continued exploration of graphics programs with emphasis on the creative use of available tools. Three-dimensional modeling, animation and interactive media are used. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 210

ART 311 Online Production

A studio/performance-oriented course that is an advanced Web design and production class addressing the history and culture of the Internet and exploring the Web as a domain for publication and expression for online producers. Special emphasis is placed on defining the differences between client-side and server-side creations, and how these affect the content and presentation of the information on the Web. It also emphasizes the evolution of multimedia into hypermedia through the use of client/server tools, Web services, programming languages and databases. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 210

ART 317 Advanced 3-D Animation

A studio/performance-oriented course that investigates three-dimensional computer animation, including advanced techniques of modeling and animation. This course also includes necessary aspects of texture mapping, character rigging, motion control, animation principles, digital lighting, virtual camera principles, particle effects, dynamics and rendering. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 217

ART 330 Children's Art

Introduction to art therapy as it applies to childhood and pre-adolescence. Explores the psychology of children's art and the use of art techniques as indicators of a child's experience.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

PSY 200 and one of the following: ART 153, ART 154, ART 200, ART 201, ART 202, ART 204

ART 331 Adolescent/Adult Art

Introduction to art therapy as it applies to the complications of life experiences. Explores the psychology of adolescent and adult creativity as a substitute for language.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

PSY 200 and one of the following: ART 153, ART 154, ART 200, ART 201, ART 202, ART 204

ART 338 Animation II

The course objective is to professionalize the implementation and production of animation techniques, including the use of computers. Advanced projects deal with specific problems and exercises in drawing, storyboard and script/visual analysis. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 238 or COM 241, or consent of instructor

ART 350 Figure Painting

This course involves investigations of descriptive painting from the human form. Issues of light, space and color interaction are stressed. Students study both from the old masters and contemporary paintings, as well as from the live model. Students investigate both perceptual and conceptual approaches to painting the figure. The final goal is for each student to begin to realize their own style and to channel it toward a successful figure painting.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 154, ART 201.

ART 351 Abstract Painting

This course explores the fundamental principles of abstraction and examines the way artists interpret their visual experiences. A strong emphasis on color, composition, alignment, texture and shape relationships is emphasized. This class familiarizes students with the ways and means of abstract art and encourages each individual to approach abstraction in a way sympathetic to his or her state of consciousness. Students are encouraged to consider their identity, ethnicity, preference to subject matter and awareness of self. The class addresses different approaches to abstract painting in regard to technique, theory and history.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 201, ART 251, ART 252.

ART 398 Junior Review

For this 0-credit course, art students submit to the faculty for critique a portfolio that includes a small selection of the best pieces from each studio course taken at the University and from any institution from which UT has accepted credits. The portfolio is reviewed by no fewer than two faculty members. All portfolios are digitally documented. Students concentrating in art history submit a writing portfolio consisting of research papers completed in each art history class taken at UT or any institution from which UT has accepted credits. Unacceptable portfolios in both cases must be resubmitted no later than the end of the following semester.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

ART 298 (waived for art history majors), or permission of the instructor.

ART 400 Special Problems in Ceramics

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore ceramics with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 401 Special Problems in Painting

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore painting with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 402 Special Problems in Sculpture

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore sculpture with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 403 Special Problems in Printmaking

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore printmaking with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 404 Special Problems in Drawing

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore drawing with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 408 Special Problems in Photography

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore photography with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 410 Special Problems in Digital Art

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore computer graphics with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 411 Internship

This studio/performance-oriented course involves placement in an advertising agency, magazine or related enterprise for hands-on work experience. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(A)

Prerequisites

Junior and senior art majors only, with consent of instructor.

ART 415 Special Problems Graphic Design

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore the graphic arts with the guidance of a member of the art faculty. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 417 Special Problems in 3-D Animation

This studio/performance-oriented course is the capstone course for the concentration in this specific area of study. It allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore the digital arts and/or computer animation with the guidance of a member of the art faculty.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 420 Sustainable Design

This studio/performance-oriented course explores sustainability issues as they relate to graphic design. Special emphasis is placed on specific aesthetics relative to graphic design, as well as the many forms of sustainable inks, materials and paper.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 305 and ART 309

ART 430 Physical Computing

This studio/performance-oriented course offers an approach to learning how humans communicate through computers that starts by considering how we express ourselves physically. This course explores the nature of transduction, the usage of microcontrollers and their communication with other computers, and advances in human-computer interfaces and digital art. It requires a hands-on approach to writing code, soldering and building circuits and controls to determine how best to make these components relate to personal expression.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 210, ART 310, ART 311

ART 450 Advanced Painting Studio

This studio/performance-oriented course explores issues concerning media and methods relevant to individually designated concepts in order to encourage students to develop their own vision and style. This course provides the time and focus to develop a significant and fully realized body of work while exploring the intellectual connections between work in the studio and readings, writings and discussions in contemporary art and culture. The objective is for students to develop, through research and practice, a personal vocabulary of imagery and ideas regarding painting. May repeat for credit.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

Two of the following: ART 201, ART 250, ART 251, ART 252, ART 350, ART 351.

ART 470 Special Problems in Art History

This studio/performance-oriented course allows the professionally oriented art student to select and intensively explore a specific area of interest with the guidance of a member of the art faculty.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ART 498 Senior Seminar

This course is designed to coincide with the preparation and exhibition of the Senior Exhibit (studio art) or the preparation of a Senior Thesis (art history). Students concentrating in studio art learn the proper techniques and procedures for planning, presenting and mounting an organized body of work. Emphasis is also given to the development of an artist's statement and the proper techniques for photographic documentation. Required for digital arts majors, graphic design majors and BFA majors. Students concentrating in art history prepare a 10-15-page thesis based on a paper previously written in an art history course, and will take a short comprehensive exam.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

ART 398.

ART 499 Senior Project

Mandatory for Electronic Media Art and Technology, New Media Production, Graphic Design and Digital Arts majors. Can be taken in conjunction with ART 498 in order to participate in the BFA Senior Art Show. The Senior Project is a capstone class where students produce professional projects that summarize what they have learned in their area of concentration within their declared major. A faculty member with sufficient experience in the subject matter teaches the class as an independent study or as a full course, depending on the number of students interested in similar topics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

ASK 099 Student Success Seminar

ASK 099 is open only to students who are recommended by the faculty Academic Appeals Committee. It is a semester-long course of seminars that meets one day a week. The lectures and activities presented are motivational and developmental. The topics include confidence, study approach, emotional well-being (coping with feelings of defeat, stress-management strategies), the importance of recognizing success, problem-solving, assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses, involvement in on-campus and community activities, setting realistic academic and life goals, health issues, taking responsibility for academic and career decisions, and dealing successfully with professors. University advising staff and guest speakers from several areas of the University facilitate the seminars.

Credit Hours: 0

ASK 100 Academic Skills

An individualized skill-building course in which students enhance their academic skills using their own textbooks; improve their time management and organizational skills; and work on test-taking competencies. A basic class for students who understand that they will need new and different study skills to be successful in the college environment.

Credit Hours: 1-2

ASK 205 Advanced Academic Skills

ASK 205 covers personal and academic skill sets taught at a higher level of rigor and intensity than ASK 100.  The objective for the course is to have students recognize the importance of their role in their own college success while providing them with appropriate tools to achieve success. A holistic approach to success puts the emphasis on the student, not the skill. Students will learn to accept personal responsibility, discover self-motivation and self-awareness, set realistic and obtainable goals, become a critical thinker, cultivate emotional intelligence and become a life-long learner.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Corequisites

ASK 205 is linked with ASK 205L (Summer I) and ASK 215L (each Fall), which provides the student with specific counseling and one-on-one and/or group support meetings weekly.

ASK 205L

Is linked to ASK 205, as a complimentary laboratory course that provides the student with specific counseling in one-on-one and/or group support meetings, along with assigned exercises, in order to further support the student in their goals.  The lab portion meets once a week for the duration of the semester.

Credit Hours:

ASK 215L

Compliments and serves as a follow-up to ASK 205/205L. The objective of ASK 215L is to assist the student in successfully transitioning to a ‘normal’ academic environment through application of the skills learned in ASK 205/205L. The course closely parallels coaching now being done by Academic Excellence Programs through the Coaching for Student Success program (CSS). STEP UP students who have successfully completed the summer courses and register for fall classes will be registered in ASK 215L to facilitate working with a coach. The student’s coach, in consultation with the student, will develop a plan of action for the semester.
Credit Hours:

AST 126 Introduction to Astronomy

Designed for non-science majors. Topics include naked-eye observations, planetary motion, the solar system, and the origin, structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Satisfies general distribution requirements. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

AST 300 Astrophysics

This course is an introduction to the physics of astronomical phenomena, including celestial dynamics, the interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter, planets, stellar structure, stellar evolution, stellar remnants, galaxies, dark matter, cosmology, and the history of the Universe. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

PHY 307

AST 330 Astrobiology

Astrobiology is a cross-disciplinary study, bringing together biology, astronomy, oceanography, atmospheric science, chemistry, planetary science, and geology to study the origins of life in the universe. In this course we will examine the origins of life on Earth, the synthesis of organic molecules in space, the origin of solar systems and the possibility of life on other worlds. Lecture only.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MAT 260, PHY 201 or PHY 206

ATT 175 Athletic Training Practicum I

This course involves instruction and supervised practice of selected athletic training skills emphasizing taping and wrapping techniques. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical hour requirements. Students must be admitted into the pre-athletic training phase of the athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ATT 274 Assessment of Musculoskeletal Injuries I

Fundamental skills of athletic training examination and assessment, including examination approaches and techniques, assessment of status, and documentation for individuals with sport-related injuries. Emphasis placed on musculoskeletal disorders. Case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 270 and consent of instructor.

Corequisites

ATT 276.

ATT 275 Athletic Training Practicum II

Involves instruction and supervised practice of selected athletic training skills covering environmental hazards, emergency procedures and assessments, and technical application of selected physical agents and protective taping and wrapping. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

consent of instructor.

ATT 276 Athletic Training Practicum III

Involves supervised practice of the skills and techniques used to evaluate and assess the injuries and illnesses encountered in the field of athletic training. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

ESC 270 and consent of instructor.

Corequisites

ATT 274.

ATT 370 Medical and Surgical Issues in Athletic Training

Seminar-style class with physicians and other health care specialists emphasizing the recognition and evaluation of injuries and illnesses, and the medical intervention and rehabilitation methods used for these problems.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 100, HSC 150, HSC 230, ESC 270 and consent of instructor.

ATT 373 Therapeutic Interventions I

Studies the scientific foundations and practice-based implementation of various therapeutic interventions in athletic training. Provides knowledge necessary to make clinical decisions as to which therapeutic interventions will be most effective in a rehabilitative intervention program. Clinical case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 270, HSC 231 and consent of instructor.

ATT 374 Therapeutic Interventions II

A continuation of Therapeutic Interventions I. Studies the scientific foundations and practice-based implementation of various therapeutic interventions in athletic training. Provides knowledge necessary to make clinical decisions as to which therapeutic interventions will be most effective in a rehabilitative intervention program. Clinical case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 340, ATT 373 and consent of instructor.

ATT 375 Athletic Training Practicum IV

Involves instruction and supervised practice of selected athletic training skills. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical experience. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

ATT 276 and consent of instructor.

ATT 376 Athletic Training Practicum V

Involves instruction and supervised practice of selected athletic training skills. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical experience. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

ATT 375 and consent of instructor.

ATT 377 Assessment of Musculoskeletal Injuries II

A continuation of Assessment of Musculoskeletal Injuries I. Fundamental skills of athletic training examination and assessment, including examination approaches and techniques, assessment of status, and documentation for individuals with sport-related injuries. Emphasis placed on musculoskeletal disorders. Case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 270, ATT 274 and consent of instructor.

Corequisites

ATT 375.

ATT 475 Supervised Clinical Education Athletic Training I

Involves practical experience in evaluation and care of athletic injuries; includes directed and self-directed clinical experiences at the University and off-campus clinical sites. Provides an opportunity for development of critical thinking skills to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skills in clinical practice and the care of patients. Requirements for course completion include in-services, practical examinations, clinical assessments and clinical experience. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ATT 476 Supervised Clinical Education Athletic Training II

Involves practical experience in evaluation and care of athletic injuries including directed and self-directed clinical experiences at the University and off-campus clinical sites. Provides an opportunity for development of critical thinking skills to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skills in clinical practice and the care of patients. Requirements for course completion include in-services, practical examinations, clinical assessments and clinical experience. Students must be admitted into the athletic training program to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ATT 495 Professional Topics in Athletic Training

This course encompasses several of the professional-level competencies required for organization and administration in athletic training, including topics in budgeting, insurance and legal issues. Case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ATT 370 and consent of instructor.

AWR 201 Writing and Research

Writing and Research teaches the process of writing effective expository essays. AWR 201 includes extensive instruction and practice in research writing.  May not count for the English or writing major or minor.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 (with a grade of "C" or better).

BIO 112 Environmental Science

An interdisciplinary study concerned with the historical, ecological, social, political and economic ramifications of the global environmental crisis. Addresses issues such as demographics, energy, pollution, natural resources and environmental policy. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG)

BIO 124 Biological Science

This course is a survey of topics in biological sciences for students not majoring in biological or chemical sciences. It is structured in a lecture/discussion format to allow flexibility in pursuit of contemporary topics in biology. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

BIO 132 Biogeography and Biomes

Explores the question, "How did species of plants and animals end up where they are?" The course focuses on the ways that millions of years of geological, oceanographic and climatic processes have directed the evolution of the earth's inhabitants. Topics include the general features of the earth's major biomes, the unique biotic features of the earth's major geographic regions, and the ways in which the study of biogeography has played an important role in the history of science. This course also examines the ways that our own species has been affected by, and continues to influence, the distribution of the planet's species. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG)

BIO 135 Biodiversity Conservation

Explores topics such as the value of biological diversity, threats to biodiversity, strategies employed to protect endangered species and habitats, and sustainable development. How the process of science is applied to the conservation of endangered species and habitats is the central theme of the course. Case studies focus on regions of the planet that have been designated as biodiversity hotspots. Satisfies a portion of the natural science component of the baccalaureate experience requirements but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG)

BIO 137 Sustainability in Cities

An experiential learning course focused on sustainability issues and solutions in urban areas around the world. Main topics include water, waste, energy, transportation and food. Includes cross-cultural comparison of lifestyles and resource usage, and site visits to relevant local facilities are included. Satisfies general distribution requirements. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG)

BIO 183 Microbiology for the Allied Health Sciences

Focuses on diseases and the organisms that cause them. These include bacteria, viruses, fungi, rickettsia and disease-causing protozoan. Additionally, the course focuses on infectious disease caused by medical and surgical practices and accidental injuries. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 150 or equivalent.

BIO 203 Biological Diversity

Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course as these represent the mechanisms through which biological diversity arises. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward biology lower-core requirements. 

Credit Hours: 4

BIO 203L Biological Diversity Laboratory

Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course as these represent the mechanisms through which biological diversity arises.

Credit Hours: 0

BIO 204 Biological Unity

A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to count toward biology lower-core requirements.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L

BIO 204L Biological Unity Laboratory

A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals.

 

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L

BIO 205 Tropical Biology and Conservation

This course is intended for students interested in the natural history, biology, and ecology of the tropics, the most biologically diverse region of the world.  Students will study evolutionary, ecological, and other biological principles of tropical ecosystems and the natural history of the organisms that live there.  We will examine conservation programs, sustainable development practices, and the widespread impact of this region of the globe.  The course culminates in a two-week long travel experience where students will visit such places as lowland tropical rain forests, high elevation tropical cloud forests, coastal ecosystems, primary and secondary forests, and more.   In the field, students will conduct brief research programs designed to illustrate the possibilities of careers working in the tropics over a broad range of possible biological specialties ranging from working in tropical biodiversity, evolution, and sustainability to such diverse topics as agriculture and medicine.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and permission of the instructor

BIO 212 Ecology

Examines relationships between species and their environment. Students explore the contributions of abiotic and biotic factors to limitations in numbers and distributions of organisms. A strong emphasis is placed upon classical ecological issues such as production dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and competition and life history strategies in marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 212L Ecology Laboratory

Examines relationships between species and their environment. Students explore the contributions of abiotic and biotic factors to limitations in numbers and distributions of organisms. A strong emphasis is placed upon classical ecological issues such as production dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and competition and life history strategies in marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 224 Invertebrate Zoology

A study of the structure, physiology, life histories and group relationships of invertebrate animals.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 224L Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory

A study of the structure, physiology, life histories and group relationships of invertebrate animals.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 225 Vertebrate Zoology

A study of the structure, ecology, behavior and taxonomy of the major vertebrate classes.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 225L Vertebrate Zoology Laboratory

A study of the structure, ecology, behavior and taxonomy of the major vertebrate classes.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 227 Ecological Physiology

A study of the physiological basis of organismal adaptation to diverse habitats. Covers the environmental parameters impacting animal metabolism and plant productivity with a focus on the major stressors (e.g., water availability, heat, salinity, food supply, oxygen, radiation) in the habitats of each. Major topics include the adaptive and acclimative mechanisms in animals and plants with regard to osmoregulation, excretion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, neuromuscular systems, and photosynthesis. The emphasis of the laboratory is on research exploring the adaptive and acclimative strategies employed by organisms under stress and the development of scientific communication skills. BIO 227 (Ecological Physiology) is a Writing Intensive (W) course.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 227L Ecological Physiology Laboratory

A study of the physiological basis of organismal adaptation to diverse habitats. Covers the environmental parameters impacting animal metabolism and plant productivity with a focus on the major stressors (e.g., water availability, heat, salinity, food supply, oxygen, radiation) in the habitats of each. Major topics include the adaptive and acclimative mechanisms in animals and plants with regard to osmoregulation, excretion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, neuromuscular systems, and photosynthesis. The emphasis of the laboratory is on research exploring the adaptive and acclimative strategies employed by organisms under stress and the development of scientific communication skills. 

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 228 Biology of Plants

Studies the morphology, anatomy and physiology of vascular plants, with emphasis on plants and their role in human society. Additional emphases are placed upon plants' reproduction, response to environmental change, ethnobotany, medicinal botany and the development and uses of plants in ancient and modern human societies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 228L Biology of Plants Laboratory

Studies the morphology, anatomy and physiology of vascular plants, with emphasis on plants and their role in human society. Additional emphases are placed upon plants’ reproduction, response to environmental change, ethnobotany, medicinal botany and the development and uses of plants in ancient and modern human societies.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 230 Experimental Design and Biostatistics

Investigates the use of statistical methodology to evaluate biological hypotheses. Topics include basic experimental design, descriptive statistics, and scientific inference and hypothesis testing using statistical tests such as analysis of variance, correlation, regression, contingency tables and nonparametric equivalents. Example data sets drawn from ecology, general biology and biomedical sciences are used to explore concepts. Class time is broken into lecture and laboratory components.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 235 Geographic Information Systems

Teaches students the applications of geographic information systems technology to a variety of biological issues including delimiting species and habitat distribution, identifying landscape-level relationships between abiotic and biotic factors and their spatial effects on populations; identifying potential effects of human activity on natural areas and populations; and developing management and regulatory policies including defining potential protected areas.

Credit Hours: 4

BIO 242 Environmental Science and Policy

Covers many of the most threatening environmental problems facing society. When possible, these issues are discussed at local, national and global levels to demonstrate how policy and cultural differences impact the various threats to the environment and to the human population. Environmental threats are discussed both in the context of their impact on natural ecosystems and their potential threat to human health and economic growth.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 242L Environmental Science and Policy Discussion

Covers many of the most threatening environmental problems facing society. When possible, these issues are discussed at local, national and global levels to demonstrate how policy and cultural differences impact the various threats to the environment and to the human population. Environmental threats are discussed both in the context of their impact on natural ecosystems and their potential threat to human health and economic growth.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 250 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Examines vertebrate evolution through a detailed study of the systems of the vertebrates.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 250L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

Examines vertebrate evolution through a detailed study of the systems of the vertebrates.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 300 General Genetics

A detailed survey of Mendelian, molecular and evolutionary genetics. Topics covered include mechanisms and patterns of inheritance, recombination, linkage, mapping, gene expression and regulation, mutation, DNA damage and repair, DNA technologies, population and quantitative genetics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 300L General Genetics Laboratory

A detailed survey of Mendelian, molecular and evolutionary genetics. Topics covered include mechanisms and patterns of inheritance, recombination, linkage, mapping, gene expression and regulation, mutation, DNA damage and repair, DNA technologies, population and quantitative genetics.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 302 Clinical Anatomy

This course examines the relationship between anatomy and the clinical reasoning skills used in medical diagnostics. The course relies on anatomical knowledge gleaned from dissections of model organisms as well as human prosections. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates with intentions of pursuing a career in the health professions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 250

BIO 302L Clinical Anatomy Laboratory

This course examines the relationship between anatomy and the clinical reasoning skills used in medical diagnostics. The course relies on anatomical knowledge gleaned from dissections of model organisms as well as human prosections. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates with intentions of pursuing a career in the health professions.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 250

BIO 307 Microbiology

A study of the structure, function and taxonomy of microorganisms, and their interactions with humans and their environment.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 307L Microbiology Laboratory

A study of the structure, function and taxonomy of microorganisms, and their interactions with humans and their environment.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 310 Developmental Biology

A study of the developmental process in animals with emphases on cellular mechanisms, controlling development and morphology of embryos.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

BIO 300 or 320; BIO 250 recommended.

BIO 310L Developmental Biology Laboratory

A study of the developmental process in animals with emphases on cellular mechanisms, controlling development and morphology of embryos.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum; BIO 250 recommended

BIO 315 Virology

This course will introduce concepts in modern virology, with an emphasis on virus genetics, replication strategies, host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prevention and control of virus infections.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 315L Virology Laboratory

This course will focus on laboratory techniques and methodology used in modern virology, with an emphasis on virus isolation, characterization, and cellular interactions.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 317 Parasitology

A study of the major groups of parasites, emphasizing those affecting humans and domesticated animals. Examines the morphology, life history, ecology and pathogenicity of each parasite.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 317L Parasitology Laboratory

A study of the major groups of parasites, emphasizing those affecting humans and domesticated animals. Examines the morphology, life history, ecology and pathogenicity of each parasite.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 320 Molecular Genetics

This course addresses the major concepts in the field of genetics with an emphasis on the molecular basis of genetics. Major topics include DNA and protein chemistry, prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA replication, transcription, translation and gene regulation, protein trafficking, pedigree analysis, DNA technologies, DNA damage and repair, recombination, transposable elements, genomics, chromosome structure, transgenic organisms and current advances in molecular genetics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 320L Molecular Genetics Laboratory

This course addresses the major concepts in the field of genetics with an emphasis on the molecular basis of genetics. Major topics include DNA and protein chemistry, prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA replication, transcription, translation and gene regulation, protein trafficking, pedigree analysis, DNA technologies, DNA damage and repair, recombination, transposable elements, genomics, chromosome structure, transgenic organisms and current advances in molecular genetics.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 330 General Physiology

A study of the major physiological systems of animals from a comparative perspective. Covers functional anatomy, homeostasis, evolutionary relationships, neurophysiology, dynamics of muscle contraction, endocrinology, cardiovascular physiology and environmental physiology.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 330L General Physiology Laboratory

A study of the major physiological systems of animals from a comparative perspective. Covers functional anatomy, homeostasis, evolutionary relationships, neurophysiology, dynamics of muscle contraction, endocrinology, cardiovascular physiology and environmental physiology.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 340 Ichthyology

Examines the relationship between the unifying biological principles of evolutionary adaptation and the diversity of form and function found among fishes. The course considers the physical and biological selective pressures this group of vertebrates has faced during its evolutionary history and the morphological, physiological, developmental and behavioral adaptations that have arisen in response to these ecological factors. How fishes function in marine and freshwater ecosystems and the management actions being taken to conserve them as natural resources are examined.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 225 or 250.

BIO 340L Ichthyology Laboratory

Examines the relationship between the unifying biological principles of evolutionary adaptation and the diversity of form and function found among fishes. The course considers the physical and biological selective pressures this group of vertebrates has faced during its evolutionary history and the morphological, physiological, developmental and behavioral adaptations that have arisen in response to these ecological factors. How fishes function in marine and freshwater ecosystems and the management actions being taken to conserve them as natural resources are examined.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 225 or BIO 250

BIO 346 Conservation Biology

A study of the biological and human factors relating to the current global extinction crisis and how conservation practices are used to evaluate and preserve threatened species and habitats. Emphases are placed upon how issues in ecology, population, biology and taxonomy affect the status of a species, and how these issues relate to policy and management decisions. Materials covered are connected to current literature in weekly discussion periods.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 212 or MAR 222.

BIO 346L Conservation Biology Discussion

A study of the biological and human factors relating to the current global extinction crisis and how conservation practices are used to evaluate and preserve threatened species and habitats. Emphases are placed upon how issues in ecology, population, biology and taxonomy affect the status of a species, and how these issues relate to policy and management decisions. Materials covered are connected to current literature in weekly discussion periods. This course may be used as an elective for biology and marine science-biology majors, and is a required course for a major and minor in environmental science.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 212 or MAR 222

BIO 349 Water, Wetlands and Wildlife

This lecture course covers the struggle between rapid human population growth, the availability of clean water, and the health of aquatic and wetland systems and the wildlife within. Covers a broad range of topics from three major themes: 1) water resource use and water pollution impacts and policy; 2) wetlands biology, impacts, legislation, jurisdictional determination and policy; and 3) the biology, impacts, assessment and conservation of aquatic and semi-aquatic wildlife. International case studies will augment a focus on water issues in the U.S.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 350 Cell Biology

A study of general cellular organization, the physico-chemical aspects of living systems, cell energetics, cell membrane systems, signal transduction and second messenger systems, membrane phenomenon and cell cycle.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232.

BIO 350L Cell Biology Laboratory

A study of general cellular organization, the physico-chemical aspects of living systems, cell energetics, cell membrane systems, signal transduction and second messenger systems, membrane phenomenon and cell cycle.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232

BIO 360 Immunology

A study of the fundamental concepts of immunology, including the essentials of immunological expression, cellular and humoral immunity, immunity and disease, auto-immunity, and developmental and comparative immunology, focusing on landmark experiments that underlie its theoretical framework.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232; BIO 307 is recommended.

BIO 360L Immunology Laboratory

A study of the fundamental concepts of immunology, including the essentials of immunological expression, cellular and humoral immunity, immunity and disease, auto-immunity, and developmental and comparative immunology, focusing on landmark experiments that underlie its theoretical framework.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232; BIO 307 is recommended

BIO 370 Molecular Biology

Provides a background in molecular biology with a focus on the regulation of gene expression and the experimental approaches used to study this regulation. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation and the mechanisms that regulate these processes. Cancer genetics and mammalian coat color genetics also are discussed as models for gene regulation. The laboratory portion of the course provides experiential learning of some of the laboratory techniques discussed in lecture. Topics covered in the laboratory include DNA extraction, PCR cloning of a gene, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing, and analysis using bioinformatics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 370L Molecular Biology Laboratory

Provides a background in molecular biology with a focus on the regulation of gene expression and the experimental approaches used to study this regulation. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation and the mechanisms that regulate these processes. Cancer genetics and mammalian coat color genetics also are discussed as models for gene regulation. The laboratory portion of the course provides experiential learning of some of the laboratory techniques discussed in lecture. Topics covered in the laboratory include DNA extraction, PCR cloning of a gene, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing, and analysis using bioinformatics.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

BIO 380 Behavioral Biology

Course focuses on historical knowledge and recent advances concerning the evolution and adaptive significance of behavior from a comparative point of view. Topics include the genetic basis of behavior, the nervous system and integration of behavior, and social behavior, including mating and reproduction, predator-prey relationships and the biological bases of aggression, territoriality and communication.  Students will develop their communication skills as part of the writing-intensive requirement, learning about discipline-specific writing and research processes that engage course topics through formal and informal writing assignments, with opportunities for in-class discussion of the material, through student-led formal discussions and professor-led informal discussions.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum or equivalent

BIO 380L Behavioral Biology Discussion

Course focuses on historical knowledge and recent advances concerning the evolution and adaptive significance of behavior from a comparative point of view. Topics include the genetic basis of behavior, the nervous system and integration of behavior, and social behavior, including mating and reproduction, predator-prey relationships, and the biological bases of aggression, territoriality and communication.  Students will develop their communication skills as part of the writing-intensive requirement, learning about discipline-specific writing and research processes that engage course topics through formal and informal writing assignments, with opportunities for in-class discussion of the material, through student-led formal discussions and professor-led informal discussions.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum or equivalent

BIO 390 Essentials of Electron Microscopy

Introduces the techniques used in preparation and viewing of biological specimens on the scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and consent of instructor.

BIO 390L Essentials of Electron Laboratory

Introduces the techniques used in preparation and viewing of biological specimens on the scanning and transmission electron microscopes.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and consent of instructor

BIO 392 Natural Environments of Southern Africa

The natural history and ecology of southern Africa, including studies of the arid environments of the Namib, the fynbos and karoo, mopane woodlands and the conservation practices to protect unique plant and animal assemblages. Requires the ability to take a three-week field trip to southern Africa in the weeks following the end of the semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

biology lower core curriculum and consent of instructor.

BIO 400 Evolution

A study of the scientific foundations of evolutionary theory and the mechanisms responsible for evolutionary change. Topics covered include a historical perspective of evolution, origin of life, natural selection and adaptation, levels of selection, fitness concepts, speciation, Darwinian evolution and punctuated equilibria, extinction, the fossil record, life history evolution and human evolution. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 405 Human Evolution

A study of the evolution of humans, beginning with the origin of primates. Course includes emphases on evolutionary phenomena, morphological and molecular evolution, extinct and modern human diversity, primate behavior, and human functional anatomy and paleontology.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum: BIO 225, BIO 250 or BIO 400 recommended

BIO 405L Human Evolution Laboratory

A study of the evolution of humans, beginning with the origin of primates. Course includes emphases on evolutionary phenomena, morphological and molecular evolution, extinct and modern human diversity, primate behavior and human functional anatomy and paleontology.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum; BIO 225, BIO 250, or BIO 400 recomended

BIO 408 Bioinformatics and Genomics

This course introduces fundamental concepts, algorithms, and methods in bioinformatics and genomics.  Topics include, but are not limited to: pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, biological database searching, phylogenetic analysis, protein structure prediction, genome annotation, and comparative genomics.  The course introduces the use of computer programming and various computational tools to analyze biological data.  Understanding of bioinformatics methods and the practical application of these methods are emphasized.  No prior programming experience is necessary.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and one of the following: BIO 300, BIO 320, BIO 370, or CHE 320

BIO 408L Bioinformatics and Genomics Laboratory

This course introduces fundamental concepts, algorithms and methods in bioinformatics and genomics.  Topics include, but are not limited to: pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, biological database searching, phylogenetic analysis, protein structure prediction, genome annotation and comparative genomics. The course introduces the use of computer programming and various computational tools to analyze biological data. Understanding of bioinformatics methods and the practical application of these methods are emphasized. No prior programming experience is necessary.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and one of the following: BIO 300, BIO 320, BIO 370 or CHE 320

BIO 410 Senior Seminar

An in-depth study of a current topic in biology. Requires independent study project and presentation.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing in biology or marine science.

BIO 440 Selected Topics in Biology

Students select a topic of interest in biology and explore the subject thoroughly through directed literature-based research. Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted and a formal paper with extensive literature review. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6
(W)

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair permission

BIO 445 Biological Research

Research questions must be selected with the professor in charge of the project with approval from the department chair. Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair consent

BIO 450 Biological Research - Capstone

Research topics must be selected in consultation with the professor in charge of the project with approval from the department chair. Usually requires preliminary library or laboratory research prior to attempting a BIO 450 project (volunteer research, BIO 440 or BIO 445 recommended). Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted, a research paper and oral presentation of topic. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6
(W)

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair permission

BIO 480 Biology Laboratory Practicum

Through direct involvement both in and out of the classroom students gain practical knowledge of instruction in a college biology laboratory. Under the supervision of faculty, students are involved in the aspects pertaining to teaching a semester's biology laboratory. This may include but is not limited to presenting introductory material, aiding students during laboratories, development and critique of evaluation component(s), and laboratory preparation and maintenance. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

BIO 490 Biological Internship

Provides practical experience in science-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and firm representatives. Can be accomplished on a part-time or full-time basis. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

BIO 203 and BIO 204, 56 credit hours, minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major or approval of the department. Note: Prerequisite courses may be specified by the employer.

BIO 495 Special Topics

A lecture or laboratory course offered at the discretion of the Department of Biology. Subject may focus on a current issue in biology, training in a specific research technique, or an area of biology that is of interest to a particular group of students. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

BUS 101 Introduction to Global Business

This course emphasizes global competitiveness by introducing students to the way companies operate and to how they compete with other companies. In addition, students learn about the importance of leadership, ethical behavior and corporate responsibility in becoming successful and sustaining that success. The course examines each of the functional areas in businesses and how they work together to produce the goods and provide the services that customers demand.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Placement into FYW 101 or higher. Available to declared COB majors, Business minors, Marketing minors, Biology-Business majors, Liberal Studies majors, AD/PR majors, or by permission of COB Associate Dean during the fall and spring semesters. Open to all during the summer.

BUS 221 Business Law and Social Responsibility

Study of the legal, moral and ethical structures in business. Topics include contracts, legal framework, constitutional law, business crimes, business torts, business entities and enterprise responsibility to society.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 101.

BUS 550 Commercial Law for Financial Professionals

Study of legal issues involving accounting and financial professionals.  Topics addressed include Uniform Commercial Code Sales, Secured Transactions, Negotiable Instruments and Banking; along with Creditor's Rights, Agency, Enterprise Organizations, Securities, Professional Licensing/Regulation and the Legal Liability of Accountants.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 221

BUS 697 Career and Leadership Development

This course sets the stage for student's professional and career development throughout their two years at UT and beyond through a highly intensive, personal approach that entails not only classroom sessions but one-on-one coaching and mentoring.  Students will focus specifically on the creation of a strategic career management plan and development of leadership knowledge and skills.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MGT 598

BUS 698 Career and Leadership Development II

BUS 698 allows students to design a set of educational experiences to best meet the student's learning needs and career aspirations.  The student selects from a wide array of activities covering a broad spectrum of business experiences including leadership, communication, ethics, research, community involvement, travel study courses, internships and seminars.  Students will work independently with faculty supervisors to choose activities to help reach their professional goals as established in BUS 697.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

BUS 697.

CAR 201 Career Decision Making

For second-semester freshmen and sophomores, incoming transfer students (freshman or sophomore status) and sophomores who have not yet declared a major or who are uncertain about their previously declared major. Students gain an understanding of the process of career decision-making. They explore interests, skills, values and personality and learn how they relate to major and career choices.

Credit Hours: 1

CAR 401 Job Search Strategies

Students will be equipped to conduct successful job searches based on individual values, interests, personalities, skills, and career goals.  Tools include effective resume and cover letter preparation, networking and interview skills, addressed through lecture, research methods, guest lecturers, and class assignments.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior Status Required.

CHE 126 Chemistry and Society

Designed for non-science majors. Introduces the basic concepts of chemistry and examines them in terms of real-world examples. Satisfies general distribution requirements. May be taken as a preparatory course for CHE 152 but is not applicable toward a chemistry major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

CHE 128 Introductory Chemistry

This course deals with the fundamental principles of chemical science and basic calculations in science. Topics include scientific measurement, states of matter, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, chemical equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This course is intended for science majors as preparation for taking CHE 150/152/153L. Satisfies general curriculum distribution requirements. Lecture only. For CNHS majors only.

Credit Hours: 3

CHE 150 Chemistry for Health Care Professions

Investigates the fundamental principles of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include chemical bonding, nomenclature, gases, states of matter, solutions, acid and base theory, equilibrium and oxidation-reduction, organic functional groups, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent

CHE 152 General Chemistry I

Expands on the basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include chemical nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships, the chemistry of gases, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular geometry.  Permission to retake the course during the fall semester after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 153L (with a grade of "C" or better) and MAT 160; high school or college preparatory chemistry strongly recommended.

CHE 153L General Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 152.  Permission to retake the course during the fall semester after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 152 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 154 General Chemistry II

A continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics include solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 152 and CHE 153L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisites: CHE 155L (with a grade of "C" or better) and MAT 170.

CHE 155L General Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 154.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

CHE 152 and CHE 153L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 154 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 165 Chemistry and Art

A science course designed to teach concepts of chemistry using works of art as the context. The course may include the study of materials used in creation of objects of art, art preservation, art restoration, forgery detection and nondestructive testing. The course will also explore the effect of environmental pollution, primarily air, on the stability and longevity of objects of art. The influence of materials on aesthetics will also be included. This course has a required international travel component. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(A)

CHE 180 Environmental Chemistry

Provides an introduction to the chemistry of the processes involved in air, water and soil pollution, and covers techniques and methods used by state and federal regulatory agencies. Does not apply toward a major or a minor in chemistry. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better)

CHE 230 Selected Topics in Forensic Science

The goal of this course is to provide students with a survey of topics in forensic science that will be covered in more depth in higher-level courses. Topics may include subjects such as arson investigation, trace evidence analysis and firearms analysis. Each subject is taught individually by an expert in the field.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of “C” or better)

CHE 232 Organic Chemistry I

A study of the chemical properties and reactions of carbon and its derivatives. Topics include bonding, nomenclature, stereo chemistry, substitution, elimination and free radical reactions, organometallic compounds, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the chemistry of alkyl halides, alcohols, epoxides, glycols, alkenes and alkynes.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 233L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 233L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Experiments focus on organic laboratory techniques used in the purification of liquids and solids and in structural elucidation. Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic organic laboratory skills.

Credit Hours: 1
(W)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 232 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 234 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include the chemistry of benzene, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, polycyclic and heterocyclic compounds, condensation reactions and special topics such as carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins or pericyclic reactions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 232 and CHE 233L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 235L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 235L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Experiments involve organic synthesis and physical methods in organic chemistry including IR and NMR spectroscopy.

Credit Hours: 1
(W)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 234 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 242 Medicinal Chemistry I

This course offers an introduction of the chemical and biological properties and reactions of medicinal compounds and their metabolites. Topics include: the chemistry of bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, geometry and pharmacology. Students will be given the opportunity to present on disease-related topics and their respective treatments.
Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 232

CHE 244 Medicinal Chemistry II

This course offers an introduction of the synthesis, chemical and biological properties and reactions of medicinal compounds and their metabolites. Topics include: the chemistry of bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, geometry and pharmacology. Students will be given the opportunity to present on disease-related topics and their respective treatments.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

CHE 232 and CHE 233L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 234.

CHE 245 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

An introduction to the basic principles of bonding with an introduction to molecular orbital theory. An extensive survey of the periodic properties of the elements supplemented with representative reactions for the main group elements. Additional topics include acid and base theory and crystal field theory for the first row transition elements. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Concurrent: CHE 245L

CHE 245L Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 245.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 245

CHE 305 Applied Physical Chemistry

An introduction to principles and applications of physical chemistry. Topics include states and properties of matter, thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems, phase and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

MAT 260 (with a grade of "C" or better) and either PHY 200 or PHY 205. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 310 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 310 Analytical Chemistry

An advanced treatment of chemical equilibrium and its application to the quantitative analysis of materials. Emphasizes gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods of analysis. May be used toward a minor in chemistry. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Concurrent: CHE 310L

CHE 310L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 310.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 310

CHE 320 Biochemistry

A study of the chemical properties and biological functions of the atoms, molecules, macromolecules and macromolecular complexes that contribute to living systems. Topics include pH; structure and function of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; and the major metabolic cycles and their cellular control processes. May be used toward a minor in chemistry. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 320L Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory course is designed to supplement lecture material discussed in CHE 320 (Biochemistry).  Topics to be discussed and experiments performed by students include buffer composition and analysis; protein dilution and quantitation; enzyme kinetics and inhibition; nucleic acid purification and quantification; and ligand binding and equilibrium analysis.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 320 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 325 Biochemistry of Metabolism

This course extends the basic biochemistry (CHE 320) curriculum and provides a more comprehensive foundation. Topics covered in the lecture component include: glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen and fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids, nucleotide biosynthesis, biosynthesis of lipids, metabolism integration, metabolism of nucleic acids, and biochemical regulation of gene expression.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 320 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 340 Microscopic Examination of Firearms Evidence

This course is designed to provide hands-on experience in firearms examination, with a focus on microscopic methods. The course will explore common types of firearms evidence such as cartridge casings, bullets, bullet fragments, shot pellets, and gunshot residues. Students may fire various firearms and types of ammunition and compare these known bullets and cartridges with unknown samples, primarily using comparison microscopy. This course is conducted in collaboration with the National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC) and requires periodic travel to the NFSTC facility in Largo, Florida.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Consent of the instructor.

CHE 352 Physical Chemistry I

Topics include gases and kinetic molecular theory, the laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibrium, ideal and non-ideal solutions, electrochemistry and surface phenomena. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 310 (with a grade of "C" or better), MAT 261 (with a grade of "C" or better), and PHY 206.

CHE 353L Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to advanced chemical laboratory techniques.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 352

CHE 354 Physical Chemistry II

A continuation of Physical Chemistry I. Topics include kinetics, photochemistry, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 352 and CHE 353L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 355L Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

Continuation of physical chemistry laboratory.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 354.

CHE 410 Senior Seminar

An in-depth, independent, literature-based study of a current topic in chemistry or biochemistry. A written report and an oral presentation of the topic must be presented to and reviewed by the chemistry faculty.  Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L, CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better) and at least one of the following (with a grade of "C" or better): CHE 245, CHE 320, or (CHE 352 and CHE 353L).

CHE 420 Advanced Biochemistry

An extension of Biochemistry with an emphasis on advanced theory and methods, including enzyme kinetics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, Gibbs free energy calculations and synthetic bio-organic chemistry. Additionally, the specialized biochemistry of several organs, tissues and diseases are discussed. Graded laboratory reports, project presentations and exams are employed to assist students in mastering the fundamental concepts presented during both the lecture and laboratory portions of the course. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CHE 320 and CHE 320L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 425 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Studies atomic and molecular structure, types of chemical bonding, periodic relationships, typical reactions of inorganic substances, and the modern experimental methods used in inorganic chemistry. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 245, CHE 310 (both with a grade of "C" or better), MAT 261, and PHY 206.

CHE 426 Advanced Organic Chemistry

This course is designed to cover many of the topics discussed in Organic Chemistry I and II in more depth. Topics may include the general study of organic reaction mechanisms including Eyring plots, Hammond's postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle, isotope effects and acid-base catalysis; conformational control; stereoelectronics; Hückel molecular orbital theory; pericyclic reactions; aromaticity; free-radical species and reactions; nucleophilic substitutions; eliminations; additions; multi-step synthetic strategies; retrosynthetic strategies; and natural product synthesis. In addition, the student may be expected to develop literature research skills by preparing and presenting a project involving the total synthesis of a naturally occurring compound or a topic of current interest. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 430 Advanced Instrumental Chemistry

Studies the theory and practice of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Methodology includes spectrophotometric, chromatographic, electroanalytical and nuclear techniques. Additionally, students are required to retrieve scientific information from primary, secondary and tertiary literature sources. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L, CHE 245 and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better).

Corequisites

Concurrent: CHE 430L

CHE 430L Advanced Instrumental Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 430.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 430

CHE 432 Forensic Chemistry I

This course provides a comprehensive overview of chemical methods and techniques commonly used in the analysis of forensic evidence. Topics include 1) drugs of abuse, 2) absorbance methods and color tests, 3) fluorescence and chemiluminescence methods, 4) extractions and separations, 5) gas chromatography, 6) high performance liquid chromatography, and 7) mass spectrometry. The course is focused on forensic analytical methods, with particular emphasis on analysis of drugs of abuse, as well as interpretation of data. Lecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 310, CHE 234 and CHE 235L (all with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 433L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 433L Forensic Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 432.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 432 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 434 Forensic Chemistry II

Focuses on the application of methods discussed in Forensic Chemistry I to toxicology. Additionally, forensic methods for trace evidence analysis are introduced. Topics covered include 1) immunoassay, 2) forensic toxicology analyses of urine, blood, and alternative matrices, 3) pharmacokinetics and metabolism, 3) blood-alcohol analyses, 4) postmortem toxicology, 5) fundamentals of trace evidence analysis, 6) trace evidence analysis methods, and 7) analysis of fibers, paint chips, and gunshot residue. Lecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 432 and CHE 433L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite:CHE 435L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 435L Forensic Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 434.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 434 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 440 Professional Practice in Forensic Science

This course is designed to help students transition the knowledge and skills gained in their laboratory and coursework into employment in working forensic laboratories. The following topics, in the context of forensic science, are covered: quality assurance, courtroom testimony, ethics, data integrity, and employment practices.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 432 and CHE 433L (both with a grade of “C” or better), senior standing or permission of the instructor.

CHE 445 Advanced Organic Spectroscopy

Covers current spectroscopic methods for organic structure determination. Topics include mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and other techniques and their use in organic structure determination. Students are expected to develop literature research skills by preparing and presenting a project involving the determination of the molecular structure of a naturally occurring compound. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 451 Introduction to Research

Qualified students in junior year choose project subject in consultation with chemistry faculty member. Requires laboratory or computational research. A written report and an oral presentation of the research must be presented to and reviewed by the chemistry faculty. The project should be performed during the student’s last three semesters. This capstone experience may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L, CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better) and at least one of the following (with a grade of "C" or better): CHE 245, CHE 320 or CHE 352 and CHE 353L.

CHE 453 Chemistry Internship

Provides practical experience in chemistry-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and firm representatives. May be accomplished on a part-time basis and may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better), and at least one of the following (with a grade of "C" or better): CHE 245, CHE 305, CHE 320 or CHE 352 and CHE 353L. Must have 56 credit hours earned, minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major or approval of department chairperson.

CHE 460 Introduction to Forensic Research

Qualified students in junior year choose project subject in consultation with chemistry faculty member. Requires laboratory research related to forensic science.  A written report and an oral presentation of the research must be presented to and reviewed by the chemistry faculty. The project should be performed during the student’s last three semesters. This capstone experience may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 230, CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better)

CHE 463 Forensic Science Internship

Provides practical experience in forensic science-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and agency representatives. Students must apply for this internship at least one semester in advance. May be accomplished on a part-time basis and may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 230, CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better), 56 credit hours earned, minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major, or approval of department chair

CHE 470 Tissue Culture

This course is an introduction to biochemical principles of and techniques utilized in the science of cultivating, manipulating and assaying animal cells in vitro. This course provides the basic science knowledge and laboratory skills required for carrying out diverse research projects in biomedical science, clinical research and biotechnology. This laboratory-intensive course provides extensive hands-on experience in animal cell propagation, sub-culturing, transfection with transgenes, clonal cell isolation, cryopreservation, inducible transgene expression, and a variety of biochemical assays. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CHE 320 and CHE 320L (both with a grade of "C" or better) and BIO 204

CHE 498 Special Topics in Forensic Science

A lecture course in an applied forensic science discipline offered at the discretion of the forensic science faculty. Subject may be chosen from across forensic science but will typically involve forensic DNA analysis or forensic microscopy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CHE 499 Special Topics in Chemistry

A lecture and/or laboratory course offered at the discretion of the chemistry faculty. Subject may be chosen from theoretical and/or practical applications in biochemistry, analytical, inorganic, physical or organic chemistry.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor

CHI 101 Elementary Chinese I

CHI 101 (or equivalent skills) is a beginning Chinese language course with an emphasis on Chinese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Chinese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG), (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. Students who have successfully completed two or more years of Chinese in secondary school within the previous eight years may not enroll in Chinese 101 for credit, except by written permission of the instructor.

CHI 102 Elementary Chinese II

Beginning Chinese language course with an emphasis on Chinese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Chinese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG), (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. CHI 101 (or equivalent skills) is a prerequisite for CHI 102.

CHI 201 Intermediate Chinese I

Develops a greater understanding of Chinese culture and everyday Chinese, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG), (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or two or more years of high school Chinese, or equivalent skills.

CHI 202 Intermediate Chinese II

Develops a greater understanding of Chinese culture and everyday Chinese, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG), (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 201 or three or more years of high school Chinese, or equivalent skills.

CHI 251-259 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CHI 351-359 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CHI 451-459 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

COM 222 Media Aesthetics and Creativity

In this class, students will be asked to explore their own creative processes and develop identities as creative thinkers and producers of media. Students will research theories about creativity; explore aesthetic principles relating to two-dimensional, interactive and time-based media; and experiment with traditional and experimental narrative techniques. The focus will be on developing creative concepts in pre-production phases (e.g., sketching, storyboarding, storytelling, writing treatments and artist statements, experimenting with electronic media). Students will work both individually and in groups; research and synthesize substantive ideas from outside influences; and effectively present ideas in oral, visual and written forms.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 224 Mass Media and Society

Studies the fundamentals of communication theory to provide a foundation for understanding how the mass media work, how they influence us, how we can analyze them and how we can effectively use them. Students can apply these critical skills to their roles as responsible consumers and communication professionals. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major. 

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 225 Media Writing

An introduction to the principles and practices of writing for major types of mass communication media, with an emphasis on content, organization, conciseness and clarity. Students learn different styles of writing for print media, broadcast media, the Web, advertising and public relations. This course also discusses the ethical and legal implications of writing for the media.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

COM 226 Introduction to Scriptwriting for Motion Pictures and Television

Students learn and practice the principles behind the art and craft of scriptwriting for short, single-camera "motion picture" format, and multi-camera, live audience television (such as situation comedies). May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

COM 232 Visual Literacy

It is one of the great ironies of contemporary existence that we are beset, informed, controlled and constructed by images, yet we receive almost no formal training in understanding and creating visual communication. Visual Literacy addresses this issue through interdisciplinary study of the terminology and theory of visual communication, with special emphasis on the relationship of visuality and cultural practice. Considering ideas from art history, photography, film, mass media and cultural studies, students are asked to analyze visual rhetoric, begin to see critically, articulate meaning and author visual rhetoric of their own. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

COM 234 Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 236 Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 237 Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 241 Introduction to Sound, Image and Motion

An introduction to hands-on digital film production and post-production. Each student will complete a short documentary, narrative and experimental film. Technical instruction will include level-one instruction on non-linear digital editing software and an introduction to HD cameras. Students will be introduced to portable equipment at the cage (including cameras, tripods, audio recording tools and more) and production facilities, including the black box studio space. Class will be comprised of technical demonstrations, in-class shoots and critiques of student work. Basic history, theory and aesthetics of related media are presented.

May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 242 Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship introduces digital media production as a means of self-discovery, self-expression and civic engagement through three key issues: how do we define and know our identities given the dominant ways we express them today? How, to what purpose and with what responsibilities do we express our identities outward into public spheres? And how can we use media authoring skills to recognize and solve social problems? Through Internet research, social media, blogging and image capture, manipulation and distribution, students will develop skills to go from casual users of various contemporary technologies to digital rhetoricians practicing active, engaged citizenship. 

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 250 Practicum in Broadcast Management

Students are responsible for the programming and management of WUTV and WUTZ, the University's closed-circuit television and radio stations. Students are encouraged to register for 1 to 2 credit hours initially and to save 4 credit hours for officer positions. Students also may participate as volunteers for either station. (Limited to 6 credit hours total.)

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 260 American Cinema

A basic introduction to film studies. Surveys the history of American narrative film with an emphasis on the cultural impact of film in society. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

COM 261 World Cinema

An examination of world cinema movements. May be used to fulfill Third World requirements. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (NW)

COM 283 Principles of Advertising

This course introduces students to the historical, cultural, economic, and social aspects of advertising. Students will discusses advertising’s relationship to marketing as well as its role in traditional and new media landscapes. This course also provides an overview of advertising management, advertising planning, advertising creativity and concepts, global advertising, and laws affecting advertising. (This course replaces COM 282, Survey of Advertising and Public Relations.)

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

This course may not be taken if the student has already taken and received a passing grade in COM 282.

COM 284 Principles of Public Relations

This is an introductory course to public relations communication. The primary objectives of this course are to help students recognize the basic concepts and principles of public relations, to help them gain an understanding of the social importance of public relations in our community and organizations, and to help students personalize these concepts to their professional career interests. (This course replaces COM 282, Survey of Advertising and Public Relations.)
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

This course may not be taken if the student has already taken and received a passing grade in COM 282.

COM 285 Information Design

Draws from a variety of design theories to create and analyze workplace documents such as training, marketing and documentation materials. Emphasis will be placed on thinking creatively about how to make information as usable as possible, and choosing appropriate media and genre for communicative purposes. Students will put theory into practice by writing and designing portfolio pieces. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

COM 300 The Documentary Tradition

Survey course on the visual documentary tradition. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 232 or consent of instructor.

COM 301 Introduction to Organizational Communication

This course introduces students to theory, research and applied practice in the study of organizational communication. Students will explore the role human communication plays in structuring, maintaining and changing organizations, and they will explore specific issues within the study of organizational communication including socialization, decision-making, conflict, stress and burnout, cultural diversity and external communication.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 302 Digital Arts for Professional Communication

This course teaches strategic use of digital tools for business purposes, including development of corporate identification, layout of print collateral, creation of print and web graphics, production and editing of small-scale video, creation of a simple websites, and development of blogs and other social media.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 210 and COM 222 or COM 225 or consent of instructor.

COM 303 Studio Television I

Emphasizes formal aspects of studio video-production operations, including camera switching, lighting, sound and accessory equipment and remote-location production for integration into a studio program. This course provides production support for WUTV programming. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the communication major. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 225 or COM 226 and one of the following: JOU 221, COM 241, or COM 242.

COM 312 Narrative Production

This course offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore narrative filmmaking using digital technologies in a combined theory and practice approach. Each student completes a series of short digital films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of narrative film. Technical instruction includes digital cinematography, lighting, sound and editing. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of the narrative film. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for communication or the film and media arts majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 226 and COM 241 or COM 313.

COM 313 Documentary Production

This course offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore documentary filmmaking using digital technologies in a combined theory and practice approach. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of documentary film and video. Technical instruction includes digital cinematography, lighting, sound and editing. Each student completes one or more short digital films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of the documentary film. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for communication or the film and media arts majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: JOU 221, COM 241, or COM 242.

COM 314 Experimental Filmmaking

This course offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore experimental filmmaking in a combined theory and practice approach. Each student completes one or more short films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of the experimental film. Technical instruction includes cinematography, camera operation, lighting, editing and sound. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of experimental cinema. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities, if not used for communication or the film and media arts majors. Laboratory fee required.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 241 or COM 313

COM 315 Web Design

This studio course introduces students to Web design techniques, technologies and theories, including (X)HTML, CSS and Web design software. Almost all work is performed at a computer. Laboratory fee required.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 210, COM 241, JOU 221 or consent of instructor

COM 323 Frontiers of Communication

This is a course in the politics, economics and technologies of the information age. Areas covered include basic designs of the new technologies, marketing strategies utilized to bring them to the public, and the social changes that may ensue. Emphasis is on the merger of telephone, television and computer technologies at the consumer level, and state-of-the-art developments within institutions. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 325 Writing for Broadcast News

This course covers the elements of broadcast news writing and production, including the structure of radio and television news and feature stories, research and interviewing techniques, "package" production and ethical considerations. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 225.

COM 326 Political Campaigns and Electoral Politics

An exploration of the electoral process, particularly in the United States, with emphasis on the role of communication in political campaigns.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224 or consent of instructor.

COM 327 Communication and Law

Communication and Law is the study of concepts, policies, laws and court decisions that affect communication in our society. Through text, scholarly and popular articles, sound and video recordings, court decisions, lectures and class participation, we explore critical legal principles of civilized democratic society and the range of laws that protect or restrain communication within it. In addition to examining such principles and laws for their own merit (or lack of it), the course provides a practical basis upon which students who seek to become communications professionals can identify legal issues that will influence their professional conduct.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224 and junior or senior standing.

COM 331 The Creative Triangle

The Creative Triangle explores the roles in the creative decision-making processes of the director, cinematographer and production designer. It emphasizes the technical, administrative and communication skills that provide the means for successful realization of drama, television, documentary and new media projects. The aim is to develop a wide range of skills necessary for effective performance in these roles in the context of complex creative collaboration. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

Any of the following: COM 312, COM 313, COM 314.

COM 332 Television Criticism

This is a survey of traditions of television criticism. The class covers key areas of television research and criticism, including narrative, aesthetic, production-oriented, economic, audience-centered, and ideological approaches to TV. The class will address questions related to TV as a technology, the broadcast and post-network eras of TV, the globalization of media programming, as well as a wide range of TV genres and their conventions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 333 Studio Television II

The purpose of the course is to apply studio television training to the production of a weekly telecast. Students are required to expand previous training in studio television to include planning, budgeting, booking guests in advance and program planning. Each facet of producing a weekly telecast is explored, including prerecorded elements and the roles of associate producer, assistant director, graphics wraparound and set design. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 303 or consent of instructor.

COM 334 Information and the New World Order

Examines the cultural, political, economic and ethical issues surrounding a complex, international communication movement known as the New World Information Order. Explores all aspects of the topic, with an emphasis on threats to the national sovereignty of developing countries, the bias of international news agencies and cultural imperialism. May be used to fulfill Third World requirements. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 335 Survey of Independent Video and Film

Students study and view tapes and films produced as part of the non-commercial independent movement. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 232 or permission of the instructor.

COM 337 Corporate Uses of Media

Students learn how to evaluate and script creative communication projects within the corporate environment. The scripts are for a variety of applications, client needs and audience levels. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 225.

COM 339 Mobile Application Design

This course teaches students to create web-based interactive applications for mobile devices. Students will apply advanced web design and interactive programming techniques to produce applications that are compatible with a variety of mobile platforms. They will learn writing and design strategies to produce content optimized for mobile devices. They will be introduced to software and protocols for converting their web-based applications to "native" applications designed to run on specific platforms and devices.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 311 OR COM 315

COM 340 Screenwriting I

Covers the elements of writing feature film scripts including character development, dialogue and dramatic structure. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or COM 240.

COM 342 Producing for Motion Picture and Digital Media

A study of producing for cinema, television, interactive, and commercial and business applications. Students acquire skills in production budgets, package development, script breakdown, cost projections, shooting schedules, and marketing and sales presentations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and one or more of COM 303, COM 312, COM 313, COM 314, COM 315, or COM 363, or instructor's permission.

COM 343 Advanced Post-Production Techniques

Students explore advanced creative and technical possibilities of motion picture editing using the University's advanced digital editing facilities. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

One of the following: COM 241, COM 312, COM 313 or COM 314, or consent of the instructor.

COM 344 Special Topics

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 346 Writing for Interactive Media

This course explores practice and theory of writing for interactive media, including hypertext and hypermedia, narrative games, critical games, and location-based media. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

One of the following: COM 225, COM 226, WRI 200, or WRI 220

COM 348 Writing the Situation Comedy

This course is an introduction to the mechanics of writing for television. From idea through final draft, students learn the process of developing scripts for television. The structural demands of commercial television and cable are explored. The student obtains a grounding in the historical development of marketable TV genres. The selling and buying of a script are analyzed, as well as strategies for creating a teleplay by oneself or with a staff of writers. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or consent of instructor.

COM 354 Internship in Communication

Internships are with local, state and national sponsors throughout the communication field. COM 354 cannot be used to meet the 300-or-above-level requirement in the major. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, minimum GPA of 3.0 in major and consent of instructor.

COM 360 Film Directors

A search for the defining characteristics of a director's works, including issues of thematic motifs and visual style. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 260 or COM 261 or consent of instructor.

COM 361 Film Genres

This course will be an investigation into the thematic, theoretical, technical and structural concepts that contribute to our understanding of film genre. Students, through weekly informal writing as well as significant research-based formal papers, will sharpen their analytical, critical and research skills. Specifically, they will employ the methodology of critical inquiry and utilize appropriate vocabulary and processes to engage, through analysis, research, writing and discussion, in the dialogues of our discipline. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 260 or COM 261 or consent of instructor

COM 363 DVD Design and Production

This course introduces students to the principal software, programming language and methodology used in designing interactive media for DVD distribution. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

One of the following: COM 312, COM 313, COM 314 or consent of instructor.

COM 365 Critical Analysis of Media Events

The course is designed to introduce intermediate research methodologies to a student's critical analysis of large-scale media events. It involves the practical analysis of a media event, including circumstances, details, historical perspective and reactions by journalists, officials and the public. Archival coverage, documentaries, feature films, print articles and Internet sites relating to a singular or series of events will encompass a majority of the analysis. Particular attention will be given to events with international implications. Students will review the previous exposure of related topics in an effort to compare the attention given to a subject in a comparison of "before and after." May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 370 Women, Film and Popular Culture

Focuses on the politics of representing women, particularly in film, television, advertising, popular literature and the popular press. The critical background includes texts on political economy, semiotics, feminist theory and cultural studies. The student completes a major research project during the course. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the humanities, but not for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 232 or consent of the instructor.

COM 373 Interactive Journalism Production

This course combines training in Web-based multimedia technologies with instruction in journalism and digital storytelling. Students learn to plan online multimedia projects; to think as professional communicators when gathering information; to capture still images, audio and video; and to publish materials they collect in interactive packages designed for the Web. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

One of the following: COM 225, or COM 241, JOU 221, or JOU 271.

COM 375 Critical Media Practice

This course familiarizes students with key theories, techniques, and media forms that will enable them to produce creative, well-researched and thought-provoking projects that embody critical media practice.  Each student will select and examine an issue of social importance, and research media platforms and rhetorical approaches suitable for that issue. Combining scholarship with media skills, the student will create a final media project.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 242

COM 377 Special Topics

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 380 Culture, Society and Computing Technology

This course explores history, philosophy and myth surrounding computing technology and the Internet. The course examines the specifics of computing technology beginning with Plato and concluding within the discussion of the post-human. Domestic and global political/economic considerations also are discussed. Language, discourse and legal implications relating to the Internet are introduced.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 381 Digital Imaging

This class simultaneously explores digital based photography and digital manipulation of imagery. Relevant history, theory and aesthetics of related media are presented, along with discussions of the societal impact that digital imaging has introduced. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 210 or COM 241

COM 383 Writing for Advertising

This course involves strategic concept development and writing for advertising projects, as well as a look at ethical considerations related to the practice. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and COM 283, or consent of instructor.

COM 384 Writing for Public Relations

This course involves training in theory, form and style for writing public relations materials for all stages and types of public relations campaigns. This course is designed to provide students with a broad range of public relations writing skills utilized in the industry.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101, COM 225 or COM 284, or consent of instructor.

COM 390 Ethnicity in Film and Literature (Honors)

For Honors Program students only. This course is an exploration of the concept of "ethnicity" and how it may be expressed through literature and film. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

COM 392-399 Independent Study in Communication

Research or creative project under the auspices of a communication instructor. Each course (392-399) may be taken once for variable credits of 1-4 hours per course.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, COM 224, COM 225 or COM 226, and COM 232 and minimum GPA of 3.0, or consent of instructor

COM 401 Intercultural Communication

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the socio-cultural dynamics that affect the communication process. Students focus on their own cultural world view as they are exposed to the cultural dynamics and characteristics of other societies. Emphasis is placed upon the nonverbal and oral/visual aspects of communication content, structure and context. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 425 Information Technology and Human Values

Raises fundamental questions about the relationship between science and the humanities. Analyzes the role of technology in modern life with special emphasis on the impact of new information technologies. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 426 Public Opinion, the Media and Power

Examines public opinion from a variety of perspectives, providing students with the ability to be intelligent consumers of public opinion research and effective users of public opinion research tools. Explores the interaction between the media and public opinion, as well as public opinion's effects on contemporary society and politics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 431 Traditions of Digital Media

This course teaches theories of digital media from an aesthetic perspective. Students explore how scholars and practitioners have attempted to define digital media, describe their primary characteristics, and distinguish them from other forms of media. Surveying an array of digital media, from web-based and algorithmic art to videogames and synthetic worlds, the class examines how digital media both depart from and continue earlier media traditions.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

COM 232 and at least one 300-level theory course in Communication, or permission of the instructor.

COM 435 Women Directors: Theory and Criticism

Examines women directors worldwide. The course will focus on the theoretical, critical, historical, cultural and aesthetic basis of films made by international, mainstream, documentary and the avant-garde women film directors of New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, the African and Asian diasporas, and North and South America. Students will submit a series of written critical responses and complete a major project related to course material. May be counted in the humanities if not counted in the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; or one of COM 232, COM 260 or COM 261; or one course in women's studies; or consent of instructor.

COM 436 Critical Studies in Public Communication

This course studies critical contexts of public communications to bring students an understanding of forces that shape media and representation, and relationships between mass communication and the public.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 440 Screenwriting II

Advanced explorations of feature film scriptwriting and analysis. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 340 or consent of instructor.

COM 443 Communication and Cultural Studies

Students explore the role of communication in the social construction of culture. Emphasis is on acquiring knowledge of culture as an evolving process of codifications, and examining dominant and marginal cultural meaning systems in science, history and the arts. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing or consent of instructor.

COM 445 The Image and the Reality

Explores the relationship between myth and cinema. Also looks at the politics of representation as it relates to race, gender and ethnicity. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and one of the following courses: COM 260, COM 261, COM 300, COM 308, COM 335, COM 360, COM 370 or COM 465, or consent of instructor.

COM 446 Advanced Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 4

COM 450 Experimental Cinema: History and Theory

This course examines experimental, avant-garde cinema worldwide. It focuses on the theoretical, critical, historical, cultural and aesthetic basis of experimental and avant-garde films made by national and international directors. Students submit a series of written critical responses and complete a major project related to course material. May be counted in the humanities if not counted in the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A) (IG)

Prerequisites

COM 232, COM 260 or COM 261, or consent of instructor.

COM 452 Advanced Producing and the International Film Market

A seven-week course with a study abroad component at a major international film festival. The core of the course is the intensive travel component, which is intended to provide a working understanding of the contemporary film market with an emphasis on how the film producer or business executive functions in the marketplace. Activities the participants may attend may include but are not limited to red carpet competition screenings and daily workshops, internships, networking meet-ups, business and film market symposiums and critique sessions. Film and media arts majors will be encouraged to submit their films for screenings for distributors, producers and festival programmers.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 342 and permission of instructor

COM 455 Film Theory and Criticism

The course explores worldwide film theory and criticism from its roots to the present through lectures and screenings of international, global and non-western films.  Classical and contemporary theorists include Sergie Eisenstein, Andre Bazin, Gilles Deleuze, Walter Benjamin, Laura Mulvey and Lev Manovich, and more.   Issues of representation, the cinematic apparatus and semiotics including psychoanalytic film theory will be covered.  Students submit a series of written critical/theoretical responses and complete a conference style abstract and paper related to course material.  May be counted in the Humanities if not counted in the major.

 

 

 


Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Any one of the following: COM 232, COM 260, COM 261, or any 300- or 400-level course in the "Media, Culture and Society" course offerings, or instructor consent.

COM 460 Senior Seminar in Film and Digital Production

Film and media arts majors only. Seminar for seniors completing a film or digital production project as the requirement for graduation in film and media arts. Pre-production and production of the senior thesis project will be completed by the end of the semester. Students pursue production projects of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences at the University. Should be taken two semesters prior to graduation (fall semester, for spring graduation;  spring semester for fall graduation).

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing and any one of the following: COM 312, COM 313 or COM 314, or consent of instructor.

COM 463 Multimedia and Installation Art

Multi-Media and Installation Art is a course that introduces students to contemporary multi-media and installation art through both the study of the cutting edge practitioners within the field, and through the production of artwork. More specifically, the course provides students with an in-depth study of the development of multi-media art over the last fifty years and also teaches the tools for the production of such works. Modes of production covered include video projection, audio installation, site-specific works, land art, and hybrid combinations of the above modes incorporating sculpture and other traditional media such as painting.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

class='sc-courselink' href='/en/2014-2015/catalog/Course-Descriptions/COM-Communication/200/COM-241'>COM 241 or COM 242

COM 465 Senior Seminar in Cinema Studies

Seminar for seniors completing a thesis paper in cinema studies as the requirement for graduation in film and media arts. Each student pursues a cinema studies thesis project, in written form, of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences at the University. Topic varies from semester to semester.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, and any of the following: COM 260, COM 261, COM 300, COM 308, COM 335, COM 360, COM 370 or COM 445, or consent of instructor.

COM 466 International Advertising

The course is designed to help students integrate knowledge of advertising theory and practice within an international context. Instructor and students will meet occasionally over the spring semester for orientation and introduction to course material and spend two weeks abroad in May expanding the study and application of international advertising topics/concepts. In addition, the travel portion of the course will give students the opportunity to learn about and experience, first hand, advertising as a product and shaper of culture and the advertising industry’s role in a globalized economy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 283

COM 470 Communication Research Methods

This course introduces students of communication to the core concepts and common practices of both quantitative and qualitative communication research. Students will be exposed to a variety of theoretical perspectives on the nature, practice, use and meaning of research in the field of communication. Particular emphasis will be placed on research concepts and methods appropriate to the practice of advertising and public relations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COM 475 Seminar in Critical Media Practice

The course emphasizes interpretation, discussion, and practice, building upon theoretical and practical knowledge students have acquired over the course of their study in critical media practice. Using traditional and emerging media technologies, students will produce projects over the course of the semester to convey critical perspectives on phenomena with social, cultural, economic, and/or political implications.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 375

COM 490 Portfolio Reivew

The Portfolio Review is a capstone experience where in which students summarize and demonstrate what they have learned in the major and in their area of concentration. The course is delivered as a “hybrid” course (partially online, partially on ground). Faculty members oversee the submission process and evaluation.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing, Communication Majors Only.

COM 499 Senior Project

Students must apply for acceptance the semester before their anticipated enrollment. Each year, a select number of students are able to choose a senior project option in order to fulfill the 400-level requirement of the communication major. In this independent course, a student or group of students pursue a research or production objective of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences as communication majors at the University.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing.

COM 583 Advertising Campaigns

This course teaches strategic development of advertising campaigns and involves research, branding, copywriting, design and digital production. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 305 or COM 302, COM 383, and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COM 584 Public Relations Campaigns

This course focuses on a systematic process of public relations, including research, strategic planning, communication tactics and evaluation. Through an extensive public relations campaign project, students will understand and practice the multifaceted and strategic nature of public relations. The course involves case studies, group problem-solving, writing, production and client relations work.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 302 or ART 305, COM 384 and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COMH 220 Revolutions in and on TV (Honors)

Through a thematic and largely chronological approach, this class explores the revolutionary in relation to TV. The bulk of the course focuses on the people who pushed TV in new directions and the programs that directly challenged social norms. The course introduces students to the historical and ongoing revolutions in the technology of TV in addition to social, cultural and technological theory. Students will do close readings of TV “texts” and read key and classic works in the field of television studies. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

COMH 390 Ethnicity in Film and Literature (Honors)

For Honors Program students only. This course is an exploration of the concept of "ethnicity" and how it may be expressed through literature and film. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)

CRM 101 Introduction to Criminology

A study of deviant behavior as it relates to the definition of crime, crime statistics, theories of crime causation, crime typologies and victims of crime. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 102 Introduction to Criminal Justice

A study of the components of the criminal justice system from its early history through its evolution in the United States. Identifies various subsystems and their roles, expectations and interrelationships.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 200 Law Enforcement

A study of the elements of law enforcement agencies as subsystems of the criminal justice system, the history and philosophy of law enforcement, and the relationship between law enforcement and the community.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 102.

CRM 290-299 Special Summer Studies

Special course offered each year during the summer session. Course descriptions are published annually in a separate bulletin.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 206 Criminal Investigation

A study of the fundamentals of investigation including crime scene search, collection and preservation of physical evidence, interview and interrogation techniques, use of scientific aids and modus operandi.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 102

CRM 210 Ethics in Justice

An examination of the field of justice with emphases on decision-making, ethical thinking, codes of ethics and use of discretion throughout the justice system.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 212 Juvenile Delinquency

An examination of definitions of delinquent behavior, theories of delinquency and the adjudication process for juveniles. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102

CRM 240 Research Methods

The primary focus of this course is to engage the student in consuming substantive research.  Students will learn APA formatting for all scholarly work, learn the techniques and designs of research by surveying studies completed in the scholarly literature and students will gain experience researching scholarly literature, writing for an academic audience and become a better consumer of scholarly research.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 247 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

A comparative study of the United States criminal justice system with those of other countries through personal observation of agencies in the countries visited and personal interaction with agency personnel. This course requires travel outside the United States. Countries visited will vary. This course may be repeated for credit when countries change.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 300 Victimology

An examination of the extent and nature of victimization, theories of victimization, the victims' rights movement and consideration of several major kinds of victimization.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102

CRM 307 Crime Scene Investigation

An examination of scientific techniques used to develop forensic evidence discovered at a crime scene offered in a practical laboratory setting.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 206.

CRM 310 Abnormal Behavior and Criminality

An overview of abnormal behavior as it relates to the criminal justice system. Emphasis placed on personality disorders, psychoses, sexual predators and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 311 Criminal Law and Procedure

This course provides an in-depth examination of criminal law and procedure, including issues related to the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments as well as substantive criminal law, liability and defenses.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 102

CRM 313 Corrections

An introduction to the American correctional system emphasizing the history of corrections, the prison experience and correctional clientele. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 321 Comparative Criminology

A comparison of diverse types of criminal justice systems utilized by other countries and cultures with the United States criminal justice system.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 323 Correctional Law

A study of substantive and procedural law pertaining to the convicted criminal offender, including an examination of federal court decisions affecting correctional personnel and the penal process.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

CRM 324 Criminological Theory

This course will introduce the student to theoretical approaches to the explanations of crime.  This introduction will allow the student to appreciate and secure a basic understanding of the complex factors that are related to crime as well as the historical development of such approaches.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and junior or senior standing

CRM 400 Crime and Punishment: Current Controversies

An in-depth examination of current controversial issues of crime and punishment in the United States.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 401 Internship in Criminology

A meaningful field experience through placement in agencies of the criminal justice system. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Students may take a maximum of 16 credit hours while at UT. Internship credit may not be used to satisfy requirements for the major or the minor.

Credit Hours: 4-16

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.8 (3.2 for federal internships)

CRM 403 Drugs, Deviance and Crime

An in-depth analysis of the nature and extent of drug use within American society, and its relationship to crime and deviance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 406 Violence in America

A study of the broad range of violence in society, examining historical and contemporary forms of violence. Topics explored include gun crime, serial murders and terrorism.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 409 White Collar and Elite Crime

This course will explore the full range of white collar and elite crimes that are described in the criminological literature. The seriousness of these crimes will be examined in addition to the motivation, techniques, public impact, investigation and the prosecution of offenders and their punishment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101, CRM 102 and junior or senior standing

CRM 421-426 Special Issues in Criminal Justice

A forum for focusing on special issues in criminal justice, taught by visiting instructors or regular faculty. Topics covered may change each semester.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 422 Terrorism

This course will examine the origins and development of modern terrorism, from its origins during the Cold War to the present.  Through lectures, case studies, and class discussions this course will investigate general and specific elements relevant to understanding the phenomenon, including definition, national and international terrorism, global and regional factors, and terrorism’s relationship with rebellion and insurgency.  This course will examine terrorist organizations to understand the ideologies, cultures, structures, and causative factors behind major movements.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 427 Death Penalty

An examination of historical, contemporary and international perspectives on the death penalty, and ramifications for victims' families, offenders, the criminal justice system and society as a whole.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 428-430 Special Issues in Criminal Justice

A forum for focusing on special issues in criminal justice, taught by visiting instructors or regular faculty. Topics covered may change each semester.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 431 Scholarly Issues in Criminology

An examination of topics of special interest and contemporary significance provided by criminal justice practitioners from the Tampa Bay area. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.5.

CRM 432 Race, Class, Gender and Crime

This course will address how racism, classism and sexism operate and intersect in both criminological theories and in the criminal legal system. This course explores theories used to explain crime and covers victimization, offending and work in terms of race, class and gender. The offending section will address theories, types of offending, systemic responses to offending and prisons.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 450 Independent Study

A series of directed readings and short research projects on topics of interest to the student, determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours:

Prerequisites

Senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.0.

CRM 451 Senior Thesis

Requires a substantive research and writing project.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, a minimum GPA of 3.25, membership in the Honors Program or approval of department chair.

CRM 499 Criminology Capstone Experience

An integrative educational experience through which students comprehensively analyze and synthesize theories, policies and practices related to criminology and produce a paper illustrating competence in this analysis. Should be taken in senior year. Grades are awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

CRM 101, CRM 102, CRM 240, and senior standing

CST 100 Language and Culture

Not open to native speakers of the language being studied. An introduction to the language and culture of the different ethnic groups in the United States. Content and emphasis vary. SPA 100 (or equivalent skills) is a prerequisite for Spanish courses that include a language instruction component. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Equivalent to LAN 100. May be repeated when content varies.

Credit Hours: 2
(IG)

CST 201 Cross-Cultural Studies

A study of culture and the various aspects of human behavior patterned by culture. Explores cultural differences in perceptions about space and time, basic human nature, relationship to natural forces, human relationships and possessions. Includes an overview of the function of religion, political institutions, production and exchange systems, as well as linguistics, values and communication patterns in daily behavior. Enables students to identify basic cultural assumptions underlying differences in behaviors and values to facilitate cross-cultural communication.

Credit Hours: 3-4
(IG)

DAN 100 Introduction to Dance

A studio/performance-oriented, dance vocabulary, dance technique and dance history in various dance disciplines course. This course familiarizes students with little or no dance experience with basic movement concepts.

Credit Hours: 2
A

DAN 102 Applied Dance Fundamentals I

For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only.  This studio/performance multimodal course focuses on introducing the student to healthy, well-informed engagement as a practicing dance educator.  Material covered includes instruction and practice in overall self-care; an introduction to creative movement, dance vocabulary, and somatic practices; BrainDance; the concept of multiple intelligences; musicality and rhythmic development; and an introduction to dance pedagogy.

Credit Hours: 1
A

DAN 110 Ballroom Dance I

This studio/performance-oriented course focuses on development of basic skills of ballroom dance, the art of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques.  Emphasis is on standard ballroom dances, including waltz, rumba, mambo/salsa, tango, swing, and hustle.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 141 Beginning Jazz Dance I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of jazz techniques. Studio work incorporates barre, development of strength and stretch, postural alignment and movement combination(s). Required for a major in Performing Arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 142 Beginning Modern Dance I

A studio/performance-oriented course. Develops the basic skills of modern dance techniques, and includes stretching, movement combinations, improvisations, postural awareness and relaxation. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 144 Beginning Tap Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on basics of tap dance technique. Studio work concentrates on mastery of individual dance steps/styles and the application of these techniques in movement combination(s). Required for a major in performing arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 145 Dance Partnering for the Stage

This studio/performance-oriented course focuses on development of basic skills of working with a partner in class as well as onstage. Explores the fundamentals of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques as well as an introduction to basic lifts and dynamics of mutual support. Includes some basic ballroom forms as well as partner improvisation. Required for a major in performing arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
A

DAN 149 Beginning Ballet I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of classical ballet techniques. Emphasizes body placement, theory of ballet "turnout," and development of basic skills in barre and floor exercises. Required for a major in performing arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 151 Beginning Hip Hop, Urban and Funk

A studio/performance-oriented course. Studio class focusing on fundamentals of hip hop and funk technique, with an emphasis on athletic skills. Course also focuses on body placement, floor work, complex rhythmic patterns, funk "tricks" and advanced leaps, turns and jumps. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 197 Beginning Jazz Dance II

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on mastery of fundamentals of jazz techniques.  Studio work incorporates barre, development of strength and stretch, postural alignment and movement combination(s).  Required for a major in Performing Arts.  May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 141 or consent of instructor.

DAN 198 Beginning Modern Dance II

A studio/performance-oriented course that develops mastery of the basic skills of modern dance techniques, and  includes stretching, movement combinations, improvisations, postural awareness and relaxation. May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 142 or consent of instructor.

DAN 199 Beginning Ballet II

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of classical ballet techniques. Emphasizes body placement, theory of ballet "turnout," and mastery of basic ballet movements in barre and floor exercises. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 149 or permission of instructor.

DAN 200 Dance in World Cultures

An examination of non-Western dance forms, including classical, ceremonial and folk/traditional, in their historical and cultural contexts. This course is enhanced by observing video and live performances.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

DAN 201 Dance History

A historical overview of 3,000 years of dance as an art form that has become a unique means of aesthetically expressing human emotions. Enhances study through viewing of videotapes and live performances.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

DAN 202 Applied Dance Fundamentals II

This studio/performance multimodal course builds on concepts and practices from Applied Dance Fundamentals I.  Focuses on the Anne Green Gilbert method and approach to teaching dance, development of lesson plans; classroom organization and management; self-care and stress management, and the observation and assessment of various dance techniques.  Required for Applied Dance Majors and Minors.
Credit Hours: 1
A

Prerequisites

DAN 102

DAN 210 Ballroom Dance II

This studio/performance-oriented course focuses on development of basic skills of Latin ballroom dance, the art of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques.  Emphasis is on Latin dance forms, including salsa, samba, bachata, rumba, and merengue.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 231 Dance Happening Repertory

A studio/performance-oriented course for credit. Choreographing, performing or working on the technical crew for the Dance Happening. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

DAN 232 Spring Dance Concert Repertory

A studio/performance-oriented course for credit. Performing in or working on the technical crew for the Spring Dance Concert. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

DAN 241 Intermediate Jazz Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course. This studio class focuses on advancement of jazz techniques. Studio work incorporates barre technique, continuation and development of stretch/ strengthening, postural alignment and movement combination(s). Fulfills jazz dance requirement for a major in performing arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 141 or consent of instructor.

DAN 242 Intermediate Modern Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on further development and exploration of modern dance techniques. Emphasis is on more complex movement combinations and strength building. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 141 or DAN 142, or consent of instructor.

DAN 244 Intermediate Tap Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on advancement of tap techniques, including mastery of individual dance steps/styles and the application of these techniques in movement combinations. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

Beginning Tap Dance or permission of instructor.

DAN 246 Musical Theatre Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on modern and jazz dance technique as it pertains to musical theater dance/performance. Studio work is devoted to mastery of individual dance steps and various movement styles, incorporated into movement combination(s). Required for a major in Performing Arts. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 249 Intermediate Ballet

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on basic and intermediate-level ballet techniques and French terminology. Emphasizes barre and floor exercises including turns, jumps and adagio movements. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 199 or consent of instructor.

DAN 251 Intermediate Hip Hop, Urban and Funk

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on the fundamentals of hip hop and funk dance technique, and includes an emphasis on athletic skills. Course also focuses on body placement, floor work, complex rhythmic patterns, funk "tricks" and advanced leaps, turns and jumps. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 151 or consent of instructor.

DAN 261 Stretching and Relaxation

A studio/performance-oriented course. This course is designed to help a student develop and reinforce positive lifestyle habits based on body awareness through a systematic program of stretching and relaxation techniques. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 1

DAN 269 Dance Improvisation

A studio/performance-oriented course that explores creative movement skills and practices to build confidence, as well as techniques to prepare for building and choreographing dances. Emphases are on stretching boundaries of movement through improvisation, and practicing ways in which movement can be developed and manipulated toward choreography.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

DAN 270 Composition and Choreography

A studio/performance-oriented course. An exploration of methods of building and structuring dances, beginning with movement, phrasing and patterns, and culminating in choreography projects. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 269.

DAN 301 Special Topics in Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course offering instruction and experiences in specialized dance techniques such as African dance and Caribbean dance.

Credit Hours: 2

DAN 302 Applied Dance Fundamentals III

This studio/performance multimodal course builds on concepts and practices from Applied Dance Fundamentals II.  Focuses on teaching practice, development of philosophy of teaching, and outside observation and assessment of various teaching practices.  Required for Applied Dance Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

DAN 202

DAN 320 Dance Anatomy, Kinesiology and Injury Prevention

Emphasis is on basic kinesiology principles and terminology as applied to dance training and technique with a focus on muscular-skeletal anatomy and function.  Includes assessment of core strength, muscular strength, balance, flexibility, and skeletal alignment in the context of a typical dance class.  Familiarizes students with common dance injuries, their causes, and basic methods of care and rehabilitation.  All of these areas will be applied to creating a safe and effective dance class.  Required for Applied Dance Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

DAN 102, DAN 242 or DAN 342, DAN 249 or DAN 349; or permission of instructor

DAN 330-332 Special Topics in Dance

Special Topics in Dance will offer instruction and experiences in dance-related courses such as specialized dance techniques, dance theory and pedagogy. May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(A)

DAN 330T Special Topics in Dance/Travel

Special Topics in Dance will offer instruction and experiences in dance-related courses with a travel and/or study abroad component.  May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW) (A)

DAN 331T Special Topics in Dance/Travel

Special Topics in Dance will offer instruction and experiences in dance-related courses with a travel and/or study  abroad component.  May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (A)

DAN 332T Special Topics in dance/Travel

Special Topics in Dance will offer instruction and experiences in dance-related courses with a travel and/or study abroad component.  May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(A)

DAN 342 Advanced Modern Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course. Students continue to develop modern dance techniques on a more demanding level while exploring creativity through movement. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 242 or audition.

DAN 349 Advanced Ballet

A studio/performance-oriented course. Studio classes in advanced-level ballet technique. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 249 or audition.

DAN 380 Teaching Methods for Dance

This course is designed to meet the needs of students to better understand the developmental considerations and the scope and sequence of dance curricular design and teaching methods appropriate to a wide range of ages and groups. National Dance Standards and application of assessment methods also will be utilized.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only. DAN 320 or permission of instructor.

DAN 410 Applied Dance Internship

An intensive study involving the application of theoretical, philosophical, and pedagogical principles of dance education for the targeted population. Application for internship must be approved at least one semester prior to enrollment for the course.  Lectures and seminars about curriculums and instruction issues will be presented at the University.  Field experience placements will be based on elementary, secondary, or other community settings available at the time. 

Credit Hours: 0-4

Prerequisites

An elective course for Applied Dance Majors only. DAN 380 and senior status.

DAN 450 Senior Capstone Project

This capstone course presents an opportunity to integrate skills and experiences into a final culminating project.  Sample topics range from creating a business plan for opening a dance studio to designing a program for a community-based dance program to constructing a plan and curriculum for movement-based learning in the classroom.  There will be an emphasis on the practical application of the project. 

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

For Applied Dance Majors only. Senior status.

DAN 480 Teaching Methods for Community and Diverse Populations

This course is designed to help students to understand community-based art, and how to create--through research, writing, and practice--movement-oriented programs and relationships with community centers and organizations that include age considerations, curricular choices, and teaching methods appropriate to diverse populations.  Focus includes working with a variety of populations, which may include the mentally ill, older adults, people with disabilities, people in prisons, and people in hospitals and healthcare settings.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

DAN 380. For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only.

ECO 204 Principles of Microeconomics

An economic analysis of the interactions between households, businesses and the government regarding the allocation of goods, services and resources. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, production and cost determination, and resource pricing.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 competency recommended (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ECO 205 Principles of Macroeconomics

An introduction to aggregate economic analysis; use of the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model for the determination of output, employment and prices; use of the production possibilities curve analysis to illustrate opportunity cost and to show gains from trade applying the concept of comparative advantage; structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System; and conduct of monetary policy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 competency recommended (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ECO 300 Labor Economics

Labor economics examines the organization, functioning and outcomes of labor markets; the decisions of prospective and present labor market participants; and the public policies relating to the employment and payment of labor resources.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204 and ECO 205.

ECO 305 Economics of Global Inequality and Poverty

This course will cover current topics in income inequality and poverty within both developed and developing countries. For both inequality and poverty, students will study the various methods of economic measurement and identify recent dynamic trends. Empirical evidence will be used to scrutinize and explore current theoretical arguments aimed at explaining the trends. The course will also analyze contemporary policies at both the country level and within global institutions (IMF, World Bank, bilateral aid programs) aimed at alleviating poverty and lessening inequality, and examine the linkages among inequality, poverty, growth, education, technology and globalization.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 205.

ECO 310 Environmental Economics and Management

The course teaches students to use economic concepts to critically evaluate social, political and business decisions regarding environmental resource use, environmental regulation and environmental degradation. Students will gain insight into how to respond as business decision-makers to environmental regulations and to increased global competition for scarce resources.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204.

ECO 315 International Economic Development

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction and overview of development economics. The course will focus on the economies of countries other than the United States, explore the interaction between the developed and the less-developed economies of the world, and examine international trade and environmental issues in developing countries.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

ECO 204 and ECO 205.

ECO 320 Intermediate Microeconomics

This course analyzes consumer choice theory; the theory of production; competitive, oligopolistic and monopolistic market structures; and behavioral economics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

ECO 321 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

This course is designed to analyze the domestic and international impacts of public policy on GDP, employment, inflation, the trade deficit and budget surplus, the international flow of capital, foreign exchange rate variations and international competitiveness.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

ECO 340 Introduction to Game Theory and Strategy

This course studies how to reach optimal possible outcomes when several parties with conflicting interests interact in the market place.  It provides tools to formally and systematically study situations of conflict where outcomes depend not just on one's decisions, but the decisions and actions of others as well.  For instance, oligopolistic firms' simultaneous price decisions or optimal price strategy in more competitive markets can be addressed using strategic thinking and game theory.  This course also studies situations in which market participants have incomplete information and must make purchasing decisions under asymmetric information.  This upper-level elective course provides an introduction to game theory and its application in economics and business.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204, MAT 225, and QMB 210 (or equivalent).

ECO 420 Public Finance and Public Choice

Public Finance and Public Choice is a study of the public sector using applied microeconomic analysis. It carefully examines the rationale behind the size and scope of government in a market-based economy, how decisions are made in the public sector (the economics of voting/decision rules), income distribution and poverty issues, and tax theory (incidence, efficiency and equality). The course also analyzes some of today's most important policy decisions facing the economy (and its individual decision-makers) including tax policy, Social Security and Medicare reform, and fiscal federalism.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 320.

ECO 421 Mathematical Economics

The purpose of this course is to learn modeling techniques and apply them to current issues in modern economic research. Students will learn how to specify economic problems in terms of a mathematical model, solve them and interpret the results. Computational software programs are used in the course to solve these models and plot the results.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 225 (or equivalent) and ECO 320 or ECO 321.

ECO 430 International Economics and Finance

This course covers the core concepts of international trade and international finance. The first half of the semester is devoted to international trade, including the basis for trade, gains from trade, trade policy and factor mobility. The second half of the semester is dedicated to international macroeconomics-finance, including balance of payments, foreign exchange rates and international capital flows. There will be a continual focus on current events throughout the semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

ECO 320 or ECO 321.

ECO 432 Economics of Emerging Markets

This course will examine major economic and financial issues related to emerging markets, with a particular emphasis on the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). The following topics will be considered: economic liberalization programs undertaken by emerging markets in recent decades, growth drivers in the emerging markets, financial sector challenges facing key emerging markets, and monetary policy challenges faced by emerging markets.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 442 Monetary Economics

This course will provide an advanced treatment of key topics in the field of monetary economics.  The course aims to instill in students a deep understanding of the economic role of money and banking.  Models of money demand (Baumol-Tobin model, etc.), along with a thorough analysis of factors influencing money supply, will be considered.  Structural aspects of major central banks will be discussed, and, sophisticated insights into domestic and international monetary policy transmission mechanisms will be highlighted.  Economic modeling of currency crises will be discussed.  Key aspects of the international monetary system will be stressed as well.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 460 Econometrics

The course introduces basic econometric techniques that are of value to economics and business majors. The emphasis will be on understanding the linear regression model, including some key extensions and relevant applications. Besides basic fundamentals of regression analysis, the course will cover panel data models, instrumental variables, causality, time series and forecasting. Students will be required to undertake a forecasting exercise as part of the requirements for completion of the course.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Either ECO 320 or ECO 321, and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

ECO 461 Seminar in Economics

This course is designed to provide upper-level economics majors with a broad overview of key topics in economics. Areas of emphasis include U.S. and global economic conditions, monetary policy, economic growth and international economics. This is an applications course, relating the theoretical framework of economics to real-world economic developments. Students who successfully complete the course will have a good grasp of some of the fundamental economic issues and developments currently affecting the U.S. and global economies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 490 Economics Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, ECO 320 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

ECO 495 Special Topics in Economics

A course offered at the discretion of the economics department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ECO 499 Independent Study in Economics

A readings or independent study course taken for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA and consent of the department chair and associate dean.

ECO 500 Foundational Economics for Managers

For graduate students only. This is an introductory course in macro- and microeconomics for graduate business students. It studies inflation, unemployment and growth. It develops the theory of how markets work, with special attention to how prices are set in different market structures. Topics include opportunity cost; comparative advantage; supply, demand and prices; elasticity; production and cost; aggregate demand and aggregate supply; monetary and fiscal policy; and trade and exchange rates.

Credit Hours: 4

ECO 605 Economics of Global Inequality and Poverty

For graduate students only. This course covers current topics in income inequality and poverty within both developed and developing countries. For both inequality and poverty, students will study the various methods of economic measurement and identify recent dynamic trends. Empirical evidence will be used to scrutinize and explore current theoretical arguments aimed at explaining the trends. The course will analyze contemporary policies at both the country level and within global institutions (IMF, World Bank, bilateral aid programs) aimed at alleviating poverty and lessening inequality, and examine the linkages among inequality, poverty, growth, education technology and globalization.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 610 Environmental Economics and Management

For graduate students only. The course teaches students to use economic concepts to critically evaluate social, political and business decisions regarding environmental resource use, environmental regulation and environmental degradation. Students will gain insight into how to respond, as business decision-makers, to environmental regulations and to increased global competition for scarce resources.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500 or permission of instructor.

ECO 611 Methods in Regression Analysis

The aim of this course is to provide MBA students with a survey of econometric techniques that are useful for understanding the macroeconomy. By combining economic theory with statistical techniques, students learn to model macroeconomic phenomena such as unemployment, real GDP and inflation. These models lend insight into the impact of monetary, government spending and tax policies pertinent to business decision-making.  Econometric models are built and tested using the software programs Excel and Eviews. Students are required to write a research paper for completion of the course.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500. For graduate students only.

ECO 622 Global Macroeconomy

For graduate students only. This course introduces students to the global economic environment within which all modern business firms operate. The external factors considered, which directly or indirectly impact business decision-making and operations, include: domestic and foreign interest rates, exchange rate policies, foreign investment, overseas economic conditions, and international trade and capital flows. A primary objective of the course is to introduce students to major contemporary economic issues that are of international significance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 630 Antitrust Economics for Business

For graduate students only. The course explores U.S. antitrust law. Economic analysis is used to understand the motivations behind antitrust laws and to evaluate their success. Students will: 1) explore the social losses that can accompany market-power and why American society has chosen antitrust to deal with these consequences; 2) learn that collusive price fixing and market allocation communications and agreements are per se felony offenses, and that violators have been and continue to be sentenced to jail terms; and 3) analyze recent antitrust cases to understand the broad structure of antitrust law and to show the relevance of antitrust in the American business environment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 632 Economics of Emerging Markets

For graduate students only. The course will examine major economic and financial issues related to emerging markets, with a particular emphasis on the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). The following topics will be considered: Economic liberalization program undertaken by emerging markets in recent decades; Growth drivers in the emerging markets; Financial sector challenges facing key emerging markets; and, monetary policy challenges faced by emerging markets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 640 The Economics of Organizations

For graduate students only. The Economics of Organizations uses the business-related tenets of economics to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. After introducing intermediate microeconomic theory, the course uses economic intuition to address cost issues ranging from outsourcing to the addition of new product lines, agency issues from explicit contract theory to the multi-task principle and team production, and imperfect competition issues ranging from Bertrand pricing to the measurement of market competition using Herfindahl indexes. The international dimension is integrated throughout the course in establishing the competitive organizational form for the firm given the market in which it competes.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500, MKT 500.

ECO 690 Internship

May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval by the graduate office, the college internship coordinator and the associate dean. International students must consult with the Office of International Programs.

ECO 695 Special Topics in Economics

A course offered at the discretion of the ECO department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ECO 699 Independent Study in Economics

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in economics.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

EDU 200 Foundations of American Education

An introduction to the contemporary issues and trends in public education from historical, sociological and philosophical perspectives. Open to all students. Can be used to satisfy an education minor.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 206 Human Development and Learning

The course introduces the topic of human development, integrating basic concepts of physical, intellectual, cognitive, psychological, social and emotional development of children, youth and adults at each major life stage, adopting a developmental psychology perspective. Theoretical viewpoints and recent research are considered with respect to the practical application of psychosocial theory emphasizing the interaction of human development and learning. Open to all students.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 207 Philosophy of Education and Teacher Learner Relationships

Students will investigate primary source data for philosophical orientations to teaching that include progressivism, perennialism, essentialism, social reconstructivism and existentialism. Students will apply that data in the process of responding to contemporary teaching/learning scenarios and in developing their own teaching philosophy. Students will also explore teacher-learner relationships and their impact on the quality of learning encounters. Can be used to satisfy an education minor.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 208 Secondary Research Methods

This course is designed to provide secondary students with knowledge and practices of educational researcher. The course includes interpretation of student data, writing in APA style, knowledge of basic research techniques, basic statistical evaluation of research findings, qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry, action research and evaluation of research studies form peer-reviewed journals. For secondary education students only.

Credit Hours: 2

EDU 209 Cross-Cultural Comparative Research: Perspectives in International Education

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and practices of global education in the classroom. Emphasis is on international educational practices, management strategies, curriculum and instruction and their relationship to current practices in the United States. Can be used to satisfy the education minor.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 210 Technology in Education I

This course is designed to promote beginning computer literacy and engages students in problem solving, evaluation of hardware and software, examination of microcomputer applications in an educational setting and discussions of technology in education.

Credit Hours: 2

EDU 212 Human Exceptionalities

This introductory-level course adopts a developmental psychology perspective with an emphasis on the new neuroscience of the exceptional brain. The course presents the types of disability in concert with the nature and needs of children and youth with disability. The course considers the intellectual, cognitive, psychological, developmental, physical, social, emotional and learning characteristics of children and youth with special needs, including gifted and talented children and youth. Children's literature is also used to explore the psychosocial aspects of disability. Can be used to satisfy the education minor.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 252 Young Children with Special Needs

Developmentally appropriate procedures, resources and programs designed to meet the special needs of pre-kindergarten/primary-age children are investigated, analyzed and assessed. Appropriate interventions, family conferencing, procedures for mainstreaming, and processes for screening, assessment and placement are analyzed, applied and developed. Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP) and Individual Educational Plans (IEP) are researched, compared and contrasted. Analyses are conducted of methods for working with children who are abused, abandoned, homeless or neglected. Experience is arranged with adaptive and assistive technologies for children with special needs.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 300 Teaching Language Arts in the Secondary Schools (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary English education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 302 Assessment and Continuous Improvement (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge of classroom assessment techniques needed to allow for continuous improvement for students and self. The course includes knowledge related to the creation of traditional and alternative testing techniques, the review of student assessment data, the assessment of teaching impact for reflecting on personal teaching experiences and the communication of student progress to stakeholders.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 305 Classroom Management and Critical Thinking (ESOL-infused course)

This course investigates theories and strategies enabling teachers to manage student behavior and solve classroom problems. Provides intervention and management techniques for teachers and teacher candidates using principles of applied behavior analysis. Examines frameworks for creating a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction and effective communication among members of the learning community. Areas of emphasis include structuring the classroom for success, planning for instruction, managing materials and equipment, and assessing and managing student and group behavior. The course emphasizes acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies that measure higher-order thinking skills and identifies strategies, materials and technologies that expand students' thinking abilities.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 306 Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed for the teacher candidate to understand the principles of scientifically based reading research as the foundation of comprehensive instruction that synchronizes and scaffolds each of the major components of the reading process toward student mastery. Teacher candidates will gain substantive knowledge of language structure and function and cognition for each of the five major components of the reading process, including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and integration of major reading components. Students develop and analyze instructional strategies that promote understanding across all academic disciplines. At the completion of this course, teacher candidates will have a greater understanding of the reading process and will be able to apply this knowledge to maximize instructional effectiveness for students from varying academic backgrounds and diverse cultures. This course requires students to brainstorm, research, present information and engage in draft writing, revise writing and peer editing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 308 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary social studies education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 309 Practicum (with Seminar) I (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to conduct careful and systematic field-based observations tied to coursework and to engage in seminar discussions regarding those experiences. During Practicum I, candidates will complete eight essential research-based tasks required of those doing observations and fieldwork in school and classroom settings. Candidates will: 1) observe, 2) notice, 3) notate, 4) predict, 5) generate, 6) analyze, 7) critique and 8) reflect. Employing the use of these eight tasks to guide classroom observation efforts promotes the critical analysis of classroom life and facilitates the development of a realistic perspective of the realities of teaching. This is a pass/fail course.

Credit Hours: 1

EDU 310 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary biology education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 311 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary mathematics education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 312 Communication and ESOL Applications

For elementary education and secondary English education majors. This course provides a framework for synthesizing the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement and the 11 ESOL competencies in order to prepare pre-professional teachers with effective linguistic and cultural classroom-based practices. The focus of this course is on ESOL methods for comprehensible instruction, ESOL materials and curriculum, and ESOL assessment procedures for English language learners (ELLs). The final exam serves as a comprehensive overview of the ESOL components infused in the education program. An ESOL field experience is required for all students (EDU 319).

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 313 Role of the Teacher, Professional Understanding and Leadership (ESOL-infused course)

This course places teachers in a position to understand the critical role they play in creating a climate of continuous, systemic improvement in schools through the establishment of professional learning communities and the concurrent development of teacher leadership. Participants gain an understanding of how the relationships among the development of learning communities, teacher leadership, school effectiveness and site-based accountability can positively improve schools. Knowledge gained in the university classroom will be applied in site-based activities, including participant-observer studies, shadow studies, action research, problem-based learning activities, case studies and quantitative and qualitative research studies. This course requires students to brainstorm, free-write, research, rewrite, present information and peer-edit. A significant aspect of this course is teaching students about writing for different audiences.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 315 Teaching Literature and Language Arts in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

An examination of the language arts, the cognitive and literacy development of children, methods of instruction in the communication processes, the needs of the diverse learner, and the integration of language arts across the curriculum. A focus is the use of children's literature in teaching by examining genres, student responses and a balanced literacy program.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 316 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

A comprehensive survey of the basic methods of teaching reading in the elementary school. Examines the methods, materials and basic skills of teaching reading, with a focus on skill development in the intermediate classroom. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 317 Diversity and Ethics (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to conduct investigations of ethics and learner diversity, including linguistic diversity with an emphasis on developing anti-bias strategies, curriculum and learning environments, as well as corresponding interaction between teacher and learner. The course provides research-based coverage of diversity and ethics issues while emphasizing contemporary topics such as creating a climate of openness, inquiry and support by practicing classroom strategies of acceptance, tolerance, resolution and mediation. Candidates will become proficient in the areas of diversity and ethics as specified in the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically-based research instructional practices to ensure positive impact on student learning in the classroom.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 318 Teaching Reading Through Diagnostic Assessment and Instruction (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for diagnosis and correction of mild to moderate reading difficulties with an emphasis on reading instruction guided by assessment. The physical, physiological, cognitive, language, emotional and socio-cultural correlates of reading disabilities are examined to help candidates understand the nature and causes of reading problems in grades K-6. Candidates will gain facility in the selection and use of formal and informal instruments for the early detection and correction of reading difficulties. The diagnostic-prescriptive model will be applied to help candidates acquire expertise in the analysis of children's reading diagnostic data and the implementation of developmentally appropriate instructional methods that address the needs of diverse student populations. Candidates will become proficient in planning and implementing reading instruction as specified in the Florida Reading Endorsement Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically based reading research instructional practices in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension to ensure positive impact on student learning in the elementary classroom. Field hours required (Practicum II).

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 319 ESOL Practicum (with Seminar) II

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to participate in more than 45 hours of ESOL field experience. Candidates will plan and implement ESOL-relevant instruction in one-to-one, small-group and large-group settings. This course introduces the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement in the following five content areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication and understanding, applied linguistics, and testing and evaluation of ESOL.

Credit Hours: 1

EDU 321 Curriculum, Methods and Foundations in Early Childhood Education

Emphasis on developmentally appropriate objectives, materials, activities and methods of teaching the primary grades. Various historical, philosophical and sociological perspectives in early childhood education are investigated, analyzed and evaluated. The course includes 20 hours of field experience.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 322 Early Childhood Integrated Curriculum Field Experience

Involves observation/participation in early childhood education settings and an examination of instructional materials, procedures and evaluation of nursery, kindergarten and primary curricula and instructional strategies.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 323 Home, School and Community Partnerships

The course examines the ways in which early childhood programs are a part of the family support system. It focuses on the development of an understanding of traditional and nontraditional families, structural and lifestyle variations, parenting in diverse cultures and the needs of high-risk families. Implications from these understandings will guide development of a parent involvement plan that includes effective ways to communicate with parents, conference with parents, hold parent meetings and conduct home visits.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 325 Secondary Classroom Assessment

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge of classroom assessment techniques needed to allow for continuous improvement for students and self.  The course specifically includes knowledge related to the creation of traditional and alternative testing techniques, the review of student assessment data, the assessment of teaching impact for reflecting on personal teaching experiences and the communication of student progress to stakeholders. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 329 Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Elementary School

Involves study and practice in elementary physical education methods. Examines and evaluates subject matter, methods and source materials for health programs. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program; intended major in physical education.

EDU 335 Secondary Classroom Management

This course investigates theories and strategies enabling secondary teachers to manage student behavior and solve classroom problems.  Provides intervention and management techniques for teachers and teacher candidates using principles of applied behavior analysis at the secondary level.  Examines frameworks for creating a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction and effective communication among members of the learning community in the 6-12 classroom.  Areas of emphasis include structuring the classroom for success, planning for instruction, managing materials and equipment, and assessing and managing secondary student and group behavior.  The course emphasizes acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies that measure higher order thinking skills in the 6-12 classroom and students’ thinking abilities.  This course requires students to brainstorm, free-write, research, draft writing, revise writing, present information, and peer-edit. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 345 Methods of Secondary Instruction

The Methods of Secondary Instruction course discusses how to teach effectively in today’s secondary schools.  This course develops an understanding of various learning modes, learning styles, multiple intelligence, questioning techniques, and other instructional strategies to engage students and be effective in today’s secondary school classroom.  This course demonstrates how to use effective lesson plan design as well as various assessment techniques.  The course is designed to provide teacher education candidates with an opportunity to study, reflect, question, become knowledgeable about, and develop skills in instructional methods while applying and practicing these methods in a collaborative and constructive setting.  Major topics include characteristics of effective and intentional teaching; student diversity, social justice and how understanding students influences learning; planning for instruction; creating effective lessons using a variety of approaches & technologies; classroom management; assessment of student learning; and professional development. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 354 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages I-Secondary (TESOL I)

Required for all secondary majors, this survey course introduces the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement in the following five content areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication and understanding, applied linguistics, and testing and evaluation of ESOL. Has a field component.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 377 Elementary Physical Education Curriculum and Practicum

This course provides an in-depth coverage of the various curricular models and developmentally appropriate teaching methods common at the elementary level in physical education. Students will be placed at a school to observe and teach physical education under the supervision of a licensed physical education teacher. Field study required.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 380 Professional Development Clinical

This course is a clinical tutorial-based course that will provide students with additional, individualized and alternative curricula knowledge, skills and experiences to further develop the performance of teacher education candidates within the department of education.

Credit Hours: 0-3

EDU 400 Teaching Science and Social Studies in the Elementary School

This writing-intensive course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for the teaching of science and social studies content in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, writing, implementing and evaluating science and social studies instruction as specified in the Florida Elementary Education Subject Area Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to write and implement scientifically based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: history; geography; government and civics; economics; assessment in science and social studies; knowledge of matter; knowledge of forces, motion and energy; knowledge of Earth and space science; knowledge of life science; knowledge of the nature of science; and knowledge of the relationship of science and technology. In order to improve their writing skills, class participants will spend time with students in school and teach them how to write social science-based and science-based texts. Field hours required. This course requires students to brainstorm, free-write, research, rewrite, present information and peer-edit. A significant aspect of this course is teaching students about writing and learning through teaching writing, as well as learning through writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 401 Teaching Practicum II: Secondary (Not Music or PE) (ESOL-infused course)

An intensive study involving the application of theoretical, philosophical and pedagogical education principles for grades 6-12. Required is a 120-hour minimum field experience for which extensive, fully planned lessons are developed and implemented in the classroom. Lectures and seminars about curriculum and instruction issues are presented at the University. Field experience placements are assigned by the Department of Education.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 402 Teaching Art, Music and PE in the Elementary School

A specialized elementary music, art and physical education methods course. Features demonstrations with class participation. Implements a variety of strategies that facilitate active learning with music, art, movement and drama.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 403 Technology in Education II

The focus of this course is the design, development and evaluation of learning experiences using the Internet. Instructional design and development applied to multimedia instruction. Instructional strategies for higher-order learning, including problem solving. Alternative design and development methodologies. Essential multimedia production tools and techniques. Students form design and development teams to create an engaging online-based learning experience. Students create and evaluate learning activities using the Web; creation of personal learning portal.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 408 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School

This course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for the teaching of mathematics content in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, implementing and evaluating mathematics instruction as specified in the Florida Elementary Education Subject Area Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: knowledge of numbers and operations, knowledge of geometry and measurement, knowledge of algebra, knowledge of data analysis, and knowledge of instruction and assessment in mathematics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 409 Practicum (with Seminar) III

Pre-internship for elementary education and secondary education majors. An intensive study involving the application of theoretical, philosophical and pedagogical principals for grades K-12. Required is a 120-hour minimum field experience for which extensive, fully planned lessons are developed and implemented in the classroom. Lectures and seminars about curriculum and instruction issues are presented at the University. Field experience placements are assigned by the Department of Education.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 410 Final Internship Seminar IV

A course taken concurrently with Teaching Practicum IV: Final Internship. Topics include reflective inquiry, classroom management, the diverse classroom, lesson and unit planning, ethics and continued professional growth. Students will develop a professional portfolio as part of their evaluation.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of prior required course work.

Corequisites

EDU 413

EDU 413 Final Internship Practicum IV

A full semester of 14 weeks provides practical application and practice in a classroom under the direction of a certified teacher. Seminars and lectures on campus are required throughout the semester. The internship is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Students enrolling are advised that the internship is a full-time endeavor. Interns are advised against outside employment and may not enroll in additional courses concurrently without permission of the Clinical Education Committee.

Credit Hours: 10

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior required course work.

Corequisites

EDU 410

EDU 413T Final Internship International Practicum

A full semester of 14 weeks provides practical application and practice in a classroom under the direction of a certified teacher. Upon successful completion of a ten week internship, the remaining four weeks will be spent overseas at a Department of Defense school. Seminars and lectures on campus are required throughout the first ten weeks. The internship is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 10

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior course work.

Corequisites

EDU 410

EDU 418 Reading Practicum

This is a practicum course taken in conjunction with EDU 413 Final Internship Practicum IV for elementary education majors.  Programs seeking the Reading Endorsement through the Florida Department of Education are required to include a reading practicum as part of the final capstone teaching experience.  Through this culminating practicum, teacher candidates will demonstrate knowledge of the components of reading, as well as assessment and data analysis, to implement a comprehensive research-based reading plan of instruction from all students. Teacher candidates will engage in the systematic problem solving process.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior required course work.

Corequisites

EDU 313

EDU 425 Teaching Middle School and Secondary Physical Education

A study and practice in methods pertinent to middle school and secondary physical education. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 450 Independent Study in Education

The course consists of directed readings and research projects on a topic of interest to the student. Content covered must be different from that included in current courses in the major. Independent studies may be taken with any full-time professor in education programs and require consent of the department chair. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EDU 481 Comprehensive Subject Area Competency and Skills (SACS)

This course is a capstone exam that provides a framework for students to synthesize the subject area competencies and skills (SACS). A final comprehensive exam serves as an overview of subject area components infused in the education program.

Credit Hours: 0

EDU 489 Special Topics in Education

Provides in-service and teachers in training with fully accredited education coursework that satisfies Florida Department of Education certification and continuing education certification requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EDU 490-491 Special Topics in Education

Provides in-service and teachers in training with fully accredited education coursework that satisfies Florida Department of Education certification and continuing education certification requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EDU 601 Curriculum Theory

This course introduces graduate students to the study of curriculum theory. Students explore the nature of curriculum theory, differentiate curriculum theory from curriculum planning, place the study of curriculum theory within the larger history of the American school curriculum, and explore a variety of models of curriculum theory including alternative models.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 603 Tests and Measurement

This course allows graduate students to explore the role and relevance of measurement, testing and evaluation in education. Topics included are the principles of test construction, issues relating to the reliability of measurement instruments, methods of assessing the validity of test procedures and instruments, techniques of item analysis and overall impact of high stakes testing.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 605 Professional Ethics, School Law, Safety and Classroom Management

For graduate students only. This course provides a reflective look at current research and a variety of teaching strategies for the diverse classroom with a particular emphasis on adolescent behaviors in the classroom context and effective options for classroom management. The Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession in Florida will be discussed. This practical view of life in the middle and secondary classroom will feature procedures for school safety and salient information on school law.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 608 Cross-Cultural Diversity

This course is designed for graduate students and teachers who want to explore frameworks, materials and strategies that will help them translate the rationale for diversity education into effective educational practice with learners of any age, level or background. Accordingly, the course focuses on approaches to curriculum consonant with a diverse perspective.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 610 Instructional Methods

For graduate students only. This course presents mathematics instruction or science instruction as one multifaceted and dynamic experiential learning module that responds to real-world problems and issues. Emphasis is on strategies for exploring mathematics or science in local, state, national and international community environments. Teacher candidates whose emphasis is mathematics 6-12 or middle grades mathematics 5-9 are enrolled in the section co-taught by mathematics and education faculty. Teacher candidates whose emphasis is biology 6-12, chemistry 6-12, physics 6-12 or middle grades science 5-9 are enrolled in the section co-taught by science faculty and education faculty.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 611 Human Development and Social Dimensions of Learning

For graduate students only. This course addresses all social dimensions of learning, including decisions regarding social aspects of classrooms, schools and other types of learning environments that teachers face, and the powerful impact these decisions have on educational climate. Students will develop an understanding of the influence of social factors on teaching and learning, and that social dimensions impact equal access, school progress and performance, and completion of academic programs.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 612 Pedagogy and Innovation in Education

For graduate students only. Technology and innovation are key resources for education and school reform initiatives. They not only provide an avenue to access 21st-century learning and teaching practices, but also define and shape the way schools operate. Managed properly, technological innovations are a primary source of competitive advantage for school systems; they also enhance the educational well-being of a nation and anchor its global know-how. The challenge of how best to manage technology and innovation has expanded beyond its traditional home in departments like instructional technology or media centers, to the point where it now permeates nearly every aspect of teaching and learning in modern schools. Schools are increasingly turning to technological innovations to enable new forums of engaging with knowledge; to change the way we think of teacher-learner roles; to improve quality and school/home/community communication patterns; and to create and retain student motivation. In addition, teachers now face an accelerating pace of innovation in the technologies supporting and changing the processes involved in school management, assessment and instruction. This course will explore the strategic role of technology and innovation in the survival and success of schools and schooling. The course will have a strong emphasis on state-of-the-art technologies in the selection of case examples.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 613 Research in Education

For graduate students only. This course is an introduction to epistemology and historical, experimental, descriptive and survey research as it relates to seeking solutions to problems within the field of education. Classic educational research, research techniques, the analysis of research results and the uses of research are explored. This course guides classroom teachers through the process of reviewing, evaluating, conducting and disseminating educational research, and is designed to help teachers evaluate research findings and their applications to classroom practice.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 614 Social Change and the Diverse Classroom

For graduate students only. Examination of the educational theories, practice and research related to the education of diverse populations. The impact of nationality, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, class, language, sexual orientation and ability levels on knowledge bases, learning styles, socialization patterns and educational opportunities will be studied. Development of appropriate and diverse classrooms and curriculum will be emphasized. The role of teachers as social advocates and effective citizens within the context of our schools and our communities will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 616 Social Advocacy, School Reform and Leadership in Education

For graduate students only. This course provides a reflective (and reflexive) overview of the educational policy-making process at local, state and national levels, and of the ethical principles that can influence such policy making.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 617 Technology for Education and Leadership

For graduate students only. Effectively using technology across all functions of a school system is, in itself, significant systemic reform. There is a wealth of evidence showing that facilitating change in schools, and especially maintaining that change, depends heavily on capable leadership. It is imperative, therefore, that we in higher education focus on leadership for technology in schools if we are to optimize its benefits in learning, teaching and school operations.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 619 Children's Literature in the reading Program

This graduate level course is designed to provide candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for effectively integrating children's literature into a balanced reading program. Course content provides a survey of literature for children from preschool through grade 6 with an emphasis on applying the principles of valuation to selected books from a wide variety of genres. Candidates will explore the positive correlation between children's literature and reading achievement and will learn how to apply their knowledge of literature to help children grow in their language and reading abilities.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 621 Exceptional Student Learning: Inclusive Classrooms

This course traces the historical development of special education and inclusive classrooms through landmark legislation and litigation, parent advocacy and national economic and social needs. The provisions of federal and state special education mandates, judicial interpretations and Florida state guidelines regulating the delivery of educational services to persons with handicaps also will be addressed.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 622 Philosophy and Epistemology in Education

This course is an introduction to the philosophical field of epistemology and how it applies to education and learning. While the course is strongly grounded in philosophy, an emphasis will be placed on the application and relationship of epistemology to students, teachers and learning.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 623 Applied Research

This course utilizes the action research process to help educational practitioners plan and complete an action research project related to their current teaching assignment. The course examines the social, cultural and ethical issues of conducting research with children. Course activities foster critical inquiry and collaboration among practitioners, administrators, researchers and other professionals. This culminating experience in applied research will assist educators in improving or refining their actions.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 625 Internship I

For graduate students only. This course is a full-time supervised apprenticeship in middle and secondary schools mathematics or science classrooms. A full semester provides practical application of pedagogy in middle and secondary classrooms.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 635 Assessment in the Secondary School Curriculum

For graduate students only. This course is a study of secondary school curriculum and instruction as a specialized part of the total schooling system. The study of this curriculum is intended to examine historical, societal and organizational issues with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of curricular content and on the nature of the students being served in middle and secondary schools.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 640 Teaching English as a Second Language: TESOL

For graduate students only. This course provides linguistically and culturally appropriate instruction, assessment and learning opportunities for students with limited English proficiency.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 645 Internship II

For graduate students only. This course is a full-time supervised apprenticeship in middle and secondary schools mathematics or science classrooms. A full semester provides practical application of pedagogy in middle and secondary classrooms.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 660 Secondary Reading in the Content Area

For graduate students only. This course provides students an understanding of reading instructional methods, including strategies, assessment and teaching reading in the content areas. Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension in mathematics.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 670-679 Special Topics in Education

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 680 Professional Development Clinical

This is a clinical tutorial-based course that will provide students with additional, individualized and alternative curricula knowledge, skills and experiences to further develop the performance of teacher education candidates within the department of education.

Credit Hours: 0-3

EDU 682 Grant Writing in Education

Developing effective grant writing skills is essential to acquiring competitive funding from government agencies and private foundations. Writing a successful grant proposal is a blend of art and science. It requires content knowledge, writing proficiency, strong research skills, creativity, organizational ability, patience and a great deal of luck. This course will provide students with the background necessary to develop a competitive funding proposal endeavor.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 695 Independent Study in Education

The course consists of directed readings and research projects on a topic of interest to the student. Content covered must be different from that included in current courses in the major. Independent studies may be taken with any full-time professor in education programs and require consent of the department chair. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EMBA 805 Managing Innovation Strategically

This course focuses on the role of innovation in the 21st-century organization. It addresses the need for a systematic approach to building innovation capabilities and the challenges of integrating the many facets of innovation management. Leading innovators and building innovative organizations are covered from a theoretical and applied approach. Topics addressed include fundamental theories of innovation, developing innovation strategy, innovation as a business process, the role of the innovation context including leadership and organization, culture and values, people and skills, and processes and tools, and assessing and improving innovation performance. Both classroom and alternative instructional methods may be employed.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 810 Dynamic Leadership

This course examines leadership, which is defined as "the ability to influence others in the absence of positional power," through interactive, experiential learning. Students develop an understanding of leadership and gain insight into their own personal leadership styles. The course addresses group dynamics, team building, problem solving, conflict resolution, the interrelationship of trust and power, and ethical behavior in the workplace. Assignments and topics will be coordinated with EMBA 805, which is offered during the same semester.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 815 Business Communication and Interpersonal Skills

This is a hands-on course designed to help students sharpen communication and interpersonal skills through class activities, writing, presentations and simulations. It focuses on writing, speaking and interpersonal skills (i.e., negotiations, persuasion and diplomacy) necessary for a career as a business leader. Assignments and topics will be coordinated with EMBA 820, which is offered during the same semester.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 820 Accounting for Strategic Management

This course provides a pragmatic study of selected financial and management accounting concepts, methods and practices relating to financial analysis, cost assignment, cost management, performance management and decision analysis. The central focus of this course is how accounting information helps managers identify strategies and make decisions to produce a sustainable competitive advantage.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 825 Modeling and Analysis for Executive Decision Making

This course provides an overview of statistical and mathematical models for effective decision making. Tools used daily by managers, business analysts and consultants are utilized to solve problems in operations, finance, accounting, marketing, human resources, policy making, economics, etc. Topics include regression analysis, statistical process control, linear optimization, time-series forecasting and decision making under uncertainty and risk. The course is taught using lectures, cases and appropriate software packages.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 830 Strategic Operations and Information Management

This course provides an integrated view of managing information systems and operations. Case studies and the SAP enterprise system are used to address key concepts. The course covers the strategic use and development of information systems and provides hands-on experience with enterprise systems. Emphasis is placed on managing the supply chain, and its impact on strategic planning. The course addresses each element in the operation of a successful supply chain including having the right quantity, quality, location, time, price and information at each stage of the supply chain process. Both classroom and alternative instructional methods may be employed.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 835 Marketing Strategy and Value Creation

Introduces students to strategic decision-making tools for planning, promoting, pricing and distributing products and services to targeted markets, with a goal of delivering high levels of customer value. Strategic marketing management techniques that lead toward the formation of exceptional firms are applied with the use of analytical practices. The course will use current events readings, cases, simulations, discussions and formal strategic plans.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 840 Economics for Business Leaders

The goal of the course is to provide business leaders with an economic framework for making decisions. The course begins by exploring the efficiency of the market-based system and an examination of how repugnance, price controls and taxation affect that system. We examine why business institutions exist and how their boundaries are determined; explore how design architecture influences individual decision making; and study how incentives and monitoring alter employee behavior. Models for optimally pricing in commodity markets, entrepreneurial markets and markets with dominant rivals are developed. Lastly, tools for mitigating systemic risk within financial institutions are investigated.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 845 Financial Management and Strategy

This course focuses on the core concepts of financial decision making: maximizing wealth, cash flow, net present value and the existence of risk and return tradeoffs in most corporate decisions. The course also explores the implications of various financial strategies within the dynamic global financial environment. Accounting concepts learned in EMBA 820 are applied using models that are realistic and robust. Students compute prices and returns on corporate securities and the weighted average cost of capital for a firm and evaluate long term capital investment projects using capital budgeting techniques. Students also learn about capital structure theory and financing strategies firms choose to optimize their mix of debt and equity.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 850 Global Strategic Management I

This course asks the student to adopt a strategic perspective for the entire organization, with all its highly interdependent elements and dimensions, as it operates within a dynamic, global environment. The course lays the foundation for the international travel course and requires the application of conceptual models, tools and skills unique to the practice of strategic leadership and competitive global business strategies. Through readings and case studies, students will apply the concepts, tools and skills they have gained from previous coursework to real-world organizational problems, and begin preparations for the International Experience course project.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 855 Global Strategic Management II

This course is integrated with EMBA 850. Students are required to apply research skills in gathering data from a broad range of sources in order to develop quality external and internal environmental analyses. The analyses are tailored to a client and targeted country. The course includes 9- or 10-day travel study component, in addition to scheduled class meetings.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 860 Seminar in Emerging Issues

This course consists of a variety of specialty, cutting-edge business topics that students would not usually be exposed to and may be staffed by guest lecturers who are experts in a specialty field or topic. In keeping with emerging trends in graduate business education, this course is purposely left flexible to be able to accommodate critical topics as they come to light.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 601 Introduction to Instructional Design

This course introduces participants to the systems approach to instructional design. The major components of instructional development models will be presented. This course provides introductory information and application of skills and techniques necessary in the analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of instruction (often referred to as the ADDIE framework). This course will consider these issues at both the curriculum (macro) and lesson (micro) level. These skills are particularly useful for efficient and cost-effective development of solutions to novel instructional problems. The emphasis in this course is on the development of materials-centered instruction (as opposed to teacher-mediated), that is, materials and resources that are developed to be the primary means by which instruction is delivered. Contrasting views and perspectives of instructional design will be considered, such as those based on very different learning philosophies (such as objectivism and constructivism). The philosophical foundation of this course is not that there is one procedure for design, but rather an approach that works best for a particular context, audience and content.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 602 Theories of Learning and Cognition for Instruction

The course is designed to provide you with the distinctions and concepts necessary to apply various theories of learning, cognition and instruction to traditional and distance learning settings. These theories are tools that educators, administrators, instructors, counselors, parents and many others can use to make their endeavors more productive and useful. This course will introduce and illustrate the proper use of these tools in providing insights into defining and solving problems. The emphasis will always be on the use of these theories to solve realistic and relevant problems drawn from your own personal experience or from cases we will study.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 603 Inquiry and Measurement

This is a foundational course that addresses inquiry and measurement concepts at a level appropriate for master’s degree students. Through this course students will learn concepts and acquire skills that will help them make data-based decisions related to learning and human performance.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 605 Introduction to Distance Learning

This course examines the uses of distance learning in education and training environments as distance systems are increasingly used for teaching and learning. Distance education will be investigated as an instructional method in terms of delivery, development and implementation. Students will design a distributed learning system that uses emerging technologies that support distance delivery.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 606 Design of Online Collaborative Learning

In this course students will learn, explore, and apply some of the latest web technologies, research findings, principles, and instructional design techniques to design and develop collaborative learning activities and assignments in on-line environments.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 610 Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology

This course is designed for students who intend to become professionals in the field of instructional design and technology. Professionals in any field should be able to do more than just perform the skills associated with it; they should also know something about the field’s history, its current status and the trends and issues likely to impact it. The purpose of this course is to help you become conversant in these areas.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 611 Principles of Learner Motivation

This course focuses on theories and concepts of human motivation. Students explore what motivates students to learn, and examine strategies, techniques and interventions that promote and sustain learner motivation.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 612 Media for Instruction

This course covers different forms of media used for instruction, about how they can be produced and disseminated, and about the technologies that help and hinder the process of understanding. This course will explore how media, text, and technology intersect and will benefit students who anticipate authoring or sharing instructional media and texts as well as those who anticipate using or managing materials authored by others in an instructional context.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 613 Open Learning Environments in the 21st Century

This course will focus on the points where media, text and technology intersect. Primarily focuses on the open learning movement (courseware, software and resources), the history, technology and communication that facilitates learning outside the traditional classroom setting. Open learning will be explored from both the professional development and student learning perspectives.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 620 Introduction to Systematic Instructional Design

The purpose of this course is to enable students to employ systematic instructional design procedures. As a result, students who successfully complete this course should be able to design a unit of instruction by using systematic instructional design procedures. The focus of this course is the application of instructional design principles to create instructional content that can be delivered to a target group of learners.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 630 Development of Multimedia Instruction

Development of Multimedia Instruction is a course for students who are already familiar with basic instructional systems design principles and who are prepared to practice them in a Web-based environment. The course focuses on the design, development, implementation/distribution and assessment of multimedia-based learning experiences.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 640 Introduction to Program Evaluation

This course introduces the conceptual issues and practical guidelines for conducting a program evaluation. This course will define and discuss the concepts and explore the theoretical basis of the diverse models and alternative approaches to program evaluation.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 641 Management of Instructional Development

This course is designed to help students understand and comprehend project management principles, while engaging in the practice of project management. In this course students will be provided the appropriate scaffolding and instruction in order to gain the basic skills necessary to successfully lead a project team.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 642 Management of Change

This course is designed for students to be able to introduce an instructional or non-instructional change initiative in an organizational environment and plan implementing that change and monitoring its progress based on their understanding of the systemic functions of the organization. These activities will take place in the context of Human Performance technology and with the purpose of improving organizational performance based on a systemic analysis of the organization.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 644 Performance Systems Analysis

This course is designed to provide the foundational information and activities to develop the skills necessary to be successful in completing performance systems analysis in a variety of settings. While the class will focus on a narrow domain, the skills learned in the course can be applied in a variety of domains.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 650 Field Internship in Instructional Design and Technology

This field internship is designed to provide on-the-job experience in developing instructional design and technology competencies. Students will apply the skills and knowledge learned during their instructional design and technology program to a real-world workplace.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 660 Seminar in Instructional Design

Discuss advanced topics in instructional design, such as new ID models and innovative approaches to ID research. Invited specialists present lectures and lead discussions on current topics and projects. The student will discuss (1 credit) and develop solutions (2-3 credits) for a variety of human learning and performance challenges.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 690 Comprehensive Exam: Professional Portfolio

The comprehensive exam is an examination for students to demonstrate acceptable skills and competencies in the instructional design and technology program.

Credit Hours:

ENG 115 Editing Workshop

This course offers an intensive review of grammar and the conventions of standard edited English to FYW 101 students who are identified as needing additional instruction in editing.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Permission of FYW 101 instructor.

ENG 204 Advanced Composition

Further study of the principles of writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201 (101 may be waived).

ENG 205 Advanced English Grammar

Explores attitudes toward language and examines the way English works: its history, its regional and social varieties and its grammar. Includes a thorough review of the conventions of usage governing standard American written English. Satisfies a requirement for the secondary English education major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

ENG 260-269 Studies in Rhetoric and Composition

An introductory-level study of the history, theory and uses of rhetoric. May include issues in rhetoric and composition pedagogy, studies of cultural or political rhetoric and literacy studies. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

ENG 343 Approaches to TESOL and Teaching Second and Foreign Languages

This course focuses on methods and approaches to teaching second and foreign languages. It incorporates theories of second/foreign language teaching and learning as well as essential concepts from applied linguistics. This course is intended for non-education majors who may pursue graduate studies in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), applied linguistics or foreign languages, or for students who may have interest in teaching/tutoring English to non-native speakers in the U.S. or abroad.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 345 Composition Pedagogy

This course will focus on concepts, issues and approaches related to the teaching of composition. It will incorporate study of the definition and characteristics of writing and the writing/composing process.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 370 Printing, Publishing and Book Arts

The primary aims of the class are to introduce students to the aesthetic, cultural and material dimensions of the reading experience, to enhance their understanding of how physical and visual presentations shape a reader's perceptions, and to introduce the craft and art of the physical book.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 443 The Supervised Practicum in TESOL

Students will be observing, tutoring and/or teaching English as a second language at a local language school. Taken as an independent study, this is the final course required to complete the TESOL Certificate. (This course is not to be confused with Florida State Teacher Certification offered by the Education department. There is no connection between the two programs.) A TESOL Certificate is a minimum requirement to teach English internationally and at certain locations in the U.S.
Credit Hours: 4

ENG 490 English Studies: Career Internship for English Majors

Open only to juniors and seniors. Internship to acquaint English majors with careers and professions and to show them how their special skills can be used in these environments. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours, 4 of which may count toward the English major. Students must apply for the internship one semester in advance. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-10

Prerequisites

3.0 or higher GPA and consent of faculty adviser and department chair.

ENG 491 Senior Portfolio

The senior portfolio course is required for all English majors in the last semester of their senior year. The course assesses student attainment of stated outcomes and offers preparation for career development, including employment or graduate and professional schools.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior status, final year.

ENT 320 Introduction to Entrepreneurship/Feasibility

This course requires students to develop a feasibility study for a new business venture. The study will be utilized throughout courses in the major and will form the basis of the business plan in ENT 487. In addition to a historical review of entrepreneurship, students assess the value of a concept and explore opportunity recognition, innovation and creativity, pro forma financial statement development, the legal structures of business, risk analysis and types of entrepreneurial ventures.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COB requirements for taking 300-level courses.

ENT 330 Creativity and Innovative Problem Solving

This course introduces students to the principles and techniques of creativity and opportunity recognition that are critical to an entrepreneurial mindset.  Students will learn a wide variety of creative problem solving and theory building skills and have the opportunity to apply those to the development of an innovation or invention.  Students will also learn how to identify and reduce self-imposed limitations to creativity and opportunity recognition.  In addition, business modeling techniques are presented as a method for evaluating creative ideas.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320.

ENT 360 New Venture Finance

Major sources of funding for new ventures - including family and friends funding, angels, venture capitalists, informal investors, banks, investment banks, suppliers, buyers and the government - are reviewed and evaluated in this course. Some topics for this course include debt and equity capital markets, valuation, bootstrapping, joint ventures, strategic alliances, private placements, IPOs and management buyouts. Student will create pro formas and develop a funding plan for a new venture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 and FIN 310.

Corequisites

ENT 487.

ENT 380 Introduction to Hospitality Management

This course provides an overview of the trends and developments as well as the fundamental management functions in the hospitality industry. Students will gain an understanding of the primary segments of industry, including lodging, restaurants, theme parks, clubs and event management.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 or MGT 330.

ENT 390 Managing the Family Business

This course begins with an overview of the basic business principles as they apply to multi-generational businesses. The course covers the vital importance of family businesses to communities and national economies, and the unique problems and opportunities they face. A systems perspective is used to understand the dynamics among family members, the ownership and the management of the business. The course uses speakers, case studies and assessment tools to develop understanding and strategies for managing those dynamics. It is designed for majors and non-majors either from or interested in family businesses.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 330.

ENT 486 International Entrepreneurship

This course includes the study of cross-national comparisons of entrepreneurial activity and examines the formation and functioning of innovative, proactive and risk-taking organizations that cross national borders. Attention is given to understanding the skills necessary to successfully launch a new venture in the global economy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320.

ENT 487 Business Plan Development

This course draws on a broad range of business disciplines including management, marketing, finance and accounting to develop the business plan. Critical elements of the plan include industry/market analysis, clear opportunity and concept definition, target market analysis, a comprehensive human resource plan, financial pro forma analysis, as well as statements of sources and uses of funds, and an assessment of critical risks. Semester-long work on the business plan culminates with a business plan competition.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ENT 320 and MKT 360.

Corequisites

ENT 360.

ENT 490 Entrepreneurship Internship

Credit Hours: 4-8

Prerequisites

ENT 320, junior or senior standing and at least a 2.75 cumulative GPA or a 3.0 in COB courses. This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May be used to satisfy up to 4 credit hours of entrepreneurship electives. Approval of the department chair required.

ENT 495 Seminar in Entrepreneurship

Topics vary and focus on emerging ideas and the latest research in areas of entrepreneurship that are not covered by the current curriculum. Sample topics include creativity and problem-solving, innovation and technology entrepreneurship, legal issues for entrepreneurs, corporate entrepreneurship, real estate venturing and social entrepreneurship.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 or permission of instructor.

ENT 670 Creating and Leading New Ventures

For graduate students only. This course focuses on developing the skills necessary for successful entrepreneurship. Students will develop a business concept, define a new venture and market the concept, research the market and determine the commercial viability of the business concept, forecast sales and production, prepare financial pro formas, develop a marketing and funding plan, and prepare and present a business plan for the new venture. Students will have the opportunity to enter their work in a business plan competition.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundations courses and MKT 609.

ENT 683 Legal Environment of Entrepreneurial Ventures

For graduate students only. This course broadly surveys the legal issues common to entrepreneurial ventures, including selecting and working with an attorney, business entity selection, corporate governance, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, operational liabilities, insurance, debtor-creditor relations, bankruptcy, human resources and buying and selling a business.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 670.

ENT 686 International Entrepreneurship

For graduate students only. This course provides an understanding of international entrepreneurship, including the development of managerial and knowledge-based skills that underlie the successful launch of a new venture or existing business in the global economy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 670.

ENT 695 Seminar in Entrepreneurship

For graduate students only. Topics vary and will focus on emerging ideas and the latest research in areas of entrepreneurship that are not covered by the current curriculum. Though not limited to these, example topics include creativity and problem-solving, innovation and technology entrepreneurship, legal issues for entrepreneurs, corporate entrepreneurship, real estate venturing and social entrepreneurship.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 670 or permission of instructor.

ESC 105 Biokinetics and Conditioning

Involves testing, designing and implementing a personal physical fitness program. Emphasis is on developing and implementing personal fitness programs that include cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 110 Introduction to Exercise Science and Sport Studies

An introduction to the exercise science profession, including the objectives, structure, history, philosophy and biological aspects of physical education and their field applications.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 150 Comprehensive First Aid/CPR/AED

This course provides the knowledge and practical skills necessary to help sustain life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until advanced medical personnel arrive. Students develop an awareness of safety and emergency response planning in the worksite and community. Topics include CPR with AED training, prevention of infectious disease transmission, trauma care, sudden illness care, environmental hazards care and emergency response planning. American Red Cross Certifications in Adult/Child/Infant CPR with AED and Responding to Emergencies First Aid may be earned.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 151 Swimming

Develops fundamental skills and methods for teaching swimming and water safety.

Credit Hours: 1

ESC 200 Methods of Teaching Tennis

Covers methods and procedures for teaching tennis. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 1

ESC 202 Outdoor Education

An interdisciplinary approach to education in the outdoors, combining lectures, observations, field investigations and practical experiences in camping, canoeing, fish and wildlife management, environmental control and other concomitants of the outdoors. Two hours may be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 4

ESC 240 Lifetime Sports

Covers methods of teaching the recreational sports of archery, badminton and golf. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 252 Gymnastics

Prepares students for teaching educational gymnastics, tumbling and apparatus. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 270 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries

Familiarization with the field of athletic training and the basic techniques, principles and theories underlying the prevention and care of a variety of athletic injuries and conditions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisites: HSC 220 or HSC 230. Pre- or corequisities: ESC 150 or HSC 150. Alternately, students may meet the ESC 150 prerequsite by providing documentation of current First Aid & CPR with AED certification and approval by the department.

ESC 280 Adult Fitness

A comprehensive discussion of corporate fitness that stresses fitness testing, prescriptive fitness programs and the role of fitness centers in the corporate/community structure.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 301 Sport and Exercise Psychology

This is an elective course that will appeal to students who are interested in learning about human behavior during sports and exercise. It examines what motivates us, frightens us, angers us and affects our performance of physical activity or sport. Strategies for improving competitive skills, dealing with competitive pressure, maximizing performance and promoting emotional and cognitive health and well-being will be explored. In particular, this course will appeal to students majoring in human performance, athletic training, sport management, physical education, and allied health.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 307 Movement Education/Games and Sports

A comprehensive discussion of movement education, stressing an individual approach to teaching basic movement skills, games and sports.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

EDU 200.

ESC 312 Dance/Rhythmics

A course that prepares students for teaching creative rhythmics, aerobic dance, folk and square dance, line and social dance to participants of all ages.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

ESC 320 Coaching and Teaching of Football and Wrestling

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants, as well as officiating in football and wrestling, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 321 Coaching and Teaching of Baseball, Basketball and Softball

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants, as well as officiating in baseball, basketball and softball, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 322 Coaching and Teaching of Volleyball and Track and Field

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants of volleyball and track and field, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 323 Coaching and Teaching of Soccer and Field Hockey

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants of soccer and field hockey, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of adult fitness concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 329 Coaching Team and Individual Sports

A comprehensive approach to coaching athletics, including planning, values, psychology, roles and goals.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 330 Human Development and Motor Learning

A study of human development and motor learning throughout the life cycle, with emphasis on physical growth, the effects of exercise, fundamental motor patterns and developmental skill acquisition.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230.

ESC 340 Applied Kinesiology

A study of bone-muscle relationships and problems of analysis in human motion as related to the muscular skills in body mechanics and athletics.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230.

ESC 372 Principles of Exercise Leadership

This course will provide ESC adult fitness and teaching majors with the proper form, mechanics and cues to perform and present fundamental movement skills safely. In addition, majors will learn proper execution. They will also identify and analyze movement errors, and develop appropriate correction and cueing. The basics of assessment, presentation, observation and correction will be applied as students work with individuals and lead groups with the intent of developing motor and fitness skills and routines.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

HSC 100 and HSC 220 or HSC 230.

ESC 380 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Studies trends in exercise habits, exercise evaluations and the process for clients developing a total wellness approach to living. Students will learn to apply principles of developing a fitness program. Lab fees for personal trainer certification examination required. Current First Aid/CPR certification required for certification examination.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 (ESC 340 recommended).

ESC 400 Physical Education and Fitness for Special Populations

Examines the special physical education and physical fitness needs of individuals with chronic or functional handicaps.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

ESC 411 Recreation Leadership and Administration

A study of the organizational patterns and administrative processes involved in leisure-oriented organizations.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 414 Sports and Society

An analysis of sports from a sociological perspective. Investigates sport theory from historical to modern contexts. Includes a critical appraisal of the expanding literature on the origins, functions and effects of sports in society.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 450 Tests and Measurement

Open only to junior and senior exercise science majors whose concentration is teaching physical education, and exercise science students whose concentration is adult fitness. A study of the available tests, measurement and assessment procedures for the physical education or fitness instructor.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 105 and ESC 110 or HSC 200

ESC 460 Physiology of Exercise

Develops knowledge and understanding of the function and limitations of the organism during exercise.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230.

ESC 470 Field Work in Recreation

An instructional program that includes supervised pre-professional practice in approved recreational service agencies. Involves observation and participation in planning, conducting and evaluating at the face-to-face supervisory and executive levels of leadership. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Credit Hours: 4-6

Prerequisites

Completion of 6 credit hours of professional courses and departmental approval.

ESC 480 Internship in Adult Fitness Programs

Offers practical experience in health and fitness center programming. Admission by application to the department chair. Students must provide proof of current CPR certification, and may be required to provide individual liability insurance. Graded on a pass/fail basis. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 2-12

Prerequisites

Senior academic status and departmental approval.

ESC 491 Senior Seminar in Exercise Science

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced understanding of how to read, present, and interpret data involved in exercise science research. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and senior status

ESC 499 Special Topics in Physical Education

A seminar and/or independent study incorporating special issues in the field of physical education. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior standing.

ESC 605 Dimensions of Strength Training

This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of advanced dimensions and theory of strength and conditioning.  It will cover multiple components of strength & conditioning and how they relate to human performance.  The course will analyze acute training variables (exercise choice, order, intensity, volume) on a per training session basis and how they fit within the scope of a training year and career (periodization).
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and ESC 460 or a bachelor’s degree in a related field of study. For graduate students only. Must be admitted in the Masters of Science in Exercise Science and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

ESC 607 Exercise and Nutrition Science Theory

This is a seminar style course in which students investigate and report on nutrition theories underlying sport nutrition and how it relates to human performance. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

For graduate students only. Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

ESC 615 Physiology and Energetics of Exercise

This course covers, in depth, theories on the physiological responses to exercise in untrained, trained, and athletic populations.  It provides students with an advanced understanding of the role  physiological responses to exercise training.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and ESC 460. For graduate students only. Must be admitted in the Masters of Science in Exercise Science and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

ESC 617 Current Perspectives in Exercise Science

This is an interactive course in which students investigate applications used in exercise science by experts in the field and report on the scientific efficacy and application of these practices.  The course also involves application of theory using various case studies throughout the semester. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

For graduate students only. Must be admitted in the Masters of Science in Exercise Science and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

ESC 625 Exercise and Nutrition Laboratory Techniques

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a hands on advanced understanding of how to utilize laboratory techniques associated with nutrition and exercise science.  Including but not limited to body composition analysis, ultrasonography, isokinetic, isotonic, and isometric force testing.  Strength and power assessment, as well as a review of important exercise techniques.  

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

ESC 380. For graduate students only. Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

FIN 250 Personal Finance

This course is intended to help students understand and apply basic principles of good financial management in their personal financial decisions. Topics include personal budgeting, tax planning, managing cash and credit, making sound insurance decisions, investments and retirement planning. Not counted as a finance elective for the minor or the major.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204

FIN 310 Financial Management

A study of the processes, institutional framework and decisions faced by firms in the acquisition and use of funds. Practical emphasis is on corporate entities, including their utilization of capital budgeting in a world of taxes, law and risks. A traditional first course in corporate finance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201, ACC 202 and ACC 203, ECO 204 and ECO 205, QMB 210.

FIN 410 Intermediate Financial Management

An in-depth study of financial decision-making primarily in the corporate environment. This course builds and expands on the skills developed in the managerial finance course. Topics include financial statement analysis, the capital budgeting process, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, working capital management and short- and long-term financial planning. The course will include both theory and practice, and students will make extensive use of Excel.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and MAT 225

FIN 415 Applied Investment Management

Admission by permission of instructor. This course provides an opportunity for students to blend the theory of investments with the practical demands of hands-on investment management. Hands-on management of a real portfolio achieves the practical objectives. Periodically, security analysts and portfolio managers are invited as guest speakers to share practical insights on the investment management process. Bloomberg training is provided.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 440.

FIN 419 Applied Finance and Accounting using Enterprise Resource Systems

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the financial and accounting features of SAP as a solution for enterprise resource planning. The cross functional nature of business processes requires an integrated view of the company. The integration between finance and other business functions are analyzed within the context of the enterprise resource system. The configuration, data and critical transactions required by financial management are demonstrated in the course.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 203, ITM 220, And FIN 310.

FIN 425 International Financial Management

The course examines the role of the multinational firm as a catalyst and facilitator of international business. Examines and explores the management of international financial risk, foreign exchange, corporate financing from a global perspective, direct foreign investment decisions and international portfolio allocation.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and MAT 225.

FIN 440 Investments

An introductory investment analysis class. Covers common stocks, options, government and corporate bonds, mutual funds and portfolio management.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310.

FIN 470 Financial Markets, Institutions, and Money

A survey of the global financial environment, including major financial institutions, securities markets and other financial markets. Topics include money and banking, the determination of interest rates, monetary policy, market efficiency, investment banking, hedging, risk management and derivatives. The course emphasizes current and recent economic trends and financial innovations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310.

FIN 490 Finance Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

FIN 310, junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

FIN 491 Financial Policies and Strategies

Senior seminar course for finance majors. An advanced, in-depth course in finance with heavy use of cases that explore timely topics in-depth, such as forecasting and financial modeling, financial statement analysis and working- capital management. Not open to graduate students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and FIN 410.

FIN 495 Special Topics in Finance

A course offered at the discretion of the finance department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

FIN 499 Independent Study in Finance

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA and consent of the department chair and associate dean.

FIN 500 Foundations of Finance

Covers the basic tools and applications used in financial management. Includes time value of money, valuation, project evaluation, risk-return analysis and capital structure. Students will solve a variety of problems using financial calculator and spreadsheet programs.

Credit Hours: 2

FIN 611 Financial Management and Strategy

For graduate students only. This course is concerned with the theory and the practice of managerial finance, especially in the context of the publicly held corporation in a competitive global environment. The course includes analysis of current and historical financial position and short-term financial decisions. The course emphasizes long-term strategic decisions such as major investments, acquisitions and capital structure decisions. The principles of cost-benefit analysis, value creation, risk and return, and time value of money are demonstrated in a variety of business case examples. The course includes an introduction to portfolio theory, international finance and financial derivatives. (CFA)

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500, ACC 500, FIN 500, MKT 500, MGT 500, and ECO 500.

FIN 616 Advanced Financial Management

This course uses real business case studies to examine practical corporate financial management, policy and strategy. Students perform financial analysis and forecasting, examine complex financial transactions, and evaluate alternatives under uncertainty. Case topics include sustainable growth, financial distress, capital budgeting, economic value added, cost of capital and capital structure.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611.

FIN 630 International Finance

Course applies no-arbitrage theory to multinational financial management. Topics include international financial markets, international parity conditions, hedging foreign cash flows, arbitrage portfolios, international capital budgeting, international portfolio allocation and international cost of capital. (CFA)

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611.

FIN 640 Investment Portfolio Management

Encompasses portfolio management at both introductory and intermediate levels. Topic areas include: quantitative analysis, the portfolio management process and investor policy statements, portfolio construction and types of securities, portfolio performance measures and the option strategies for equity portfolios. The course also includes detailed analysis of fixed income securities, macroeconomics, industries and individual firms. (CFA)

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500 and ACC 500.

FIN 645 Advanced Portfolio Management

This course deals with the theory and practice of portfolio management and investment analysis at an advanced level. The emphasis is on strategic investment management topics and applications including portfolio optimization, performance attribution techniques, fixed income analysis and portfolio risk management. Students will learn to critically evaluate and implement existing and recently developed portfolio management models. Much of the material covered in this class is also part of the Level 2 and Level 3 CFA curriculum.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 640.

FIN 650 Venture Capital and Alternative Investments

This course describes the common types of alternative investments, methods for their valuation, unique risks and opportunities associated with them, and the relationships that alternatives have to more traditional investments. The course covers material from the CFA Candidate Body of Knowledge (CBOK).

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611.

FIN 655 Financial Analysis of Commercial Real Estate with ARGUS

This course deals with the theory and practice of evaluating commercial real estate. The emphasis is on real estate valuation, cash flow analysis, financing, and partnership structures. ARGUS software is utilized to apply the lecture material and is an integral part of the course. Students perform scenario analysis and generate reports at introductory and intermediate levels using ARGUS in a series of case studies. The course features analysis of actual commercial real estate ventures in the Tampa area.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611.

FIN 660 Applied Corporate Finance

Applied Corporate Finance is designed to provide an in-depth examination of important financial management concepts integrated with SAP. Using a balanced approach of theory and application, this class focuses on the analytical techniques involved in financial planning and decision-making in the firm. Primary emphasis is placed on the importance of strategic investment and financing choices and the logic behind these critical decisions made by the financial manager. An introduction to the financial accounting features of SAP as a solution for enterprise resource planning is provided, along with using SAP to generate information used to make financial decisions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611

FIN 670 Financial Markets, Institutions and Money

This course covers the array of financial markets and financial institutions that make up our global financial system. Topics include financial intermediation, the determination of interest rates, money and banking, monetary policy, investment banking, hedging with derivatives and market efficiency. Students learn to use financial computations involving interest rates, security prices, currency rates and other financial data. The course emphasizes current and recent trends and financial innovations. (CFA)

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611.

FIN 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval by the Graduate Office, the college internship coordinator and the associate dean.

FIN 695 Special Topics in Finance

A course offered at the discretion of the finance department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

FIN 699 Independent Study in Finance

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in finance.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

FRE 101 Elementary French I

Beginning French with an emphasis on French culture, as well as understanding and speaking French in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. Students who have successfully completed two or more years of French in secondary school within the previous eight years may not enroll in French 101 for credit.

FRE 102 Elementary French II

Beginning French with an emphasis on French culture, as well as understanding and speaking French in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 101 (or equivalent skills) is a prerequisite for FRE 102.

FRE 105 Elementary French Review

Review of French for students who have studied the language in high school for at least two years. Emphasis on accelerated grammar and on speaking. Listening comprehension, reading and writing are included.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. May not be taken after FRE 101. Credit may not be earned for both French 102 and 105.

FRE 151-159 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 201 Intermediate French I

Develops a greater understanding of French culture and everyday French, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 102 or two or more years of high school French, or equivalent skills required for FRE 201.

FRE 202 Intermediate French II

Develops a greater understanding of French culture and everyday French, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 201 or three or more years of high school French, or equivalent skills is required for FRE 202.

FRE 251-259 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 300 Advanced French I

Emphases in Advanced French I are on oral expression, reading and vocabulary building.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to students who received their secondary education in the French language. FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French or equivalent skills.

FRE 301 Advanced French II

Emphases in Advanced French II are on writing, vocabulary building and grammar.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to students who received their secondary education in the French language. FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French or equivalent skills.

FRE 310 Diplomatic French

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of French in a diplomatic setting.  Emphasis is made on writing, as well as listening and speaking skills through the use of specialized vocabulary, simulations, and paired activities.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills

FRE 311 Commercial French

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of French in a business setting. It provides a basis from which students will learn about culturally appropriate business practices in France and in the Francophone world.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 320 French Cinema

A broad survey of French cinema from the silent era through the present covering the history and evolution of French filmmaking through the viewing and analysis of its masterworks.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (A)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French, or equivalent skills.

FRE 331 Introduction to French Literature

A reading and discussion of selections by master writers of French literature.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 351-359 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 421 French Culture and Civilization

An integrated picture of the political, economic, social, geographical and cultural forces that have shaped France and the Francophone world.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

One 300-level French course or equivalent skills.

FRE 451-459 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRT 250 French Literature in English Translation

A study of great themes and values expressed by selected authors and movements in French literature. Course and readings are in English.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

FYW 100 Basics of Grammar and Writing

An intensive review of basic writing strategies and English usage offered as preparation for First Year Writing 101. The course emphasizes clarity, organization and purpose in the writing process. FYW 100 does not fulfill general distribution requirements, nor does it replace FYW 101 or 102. Students who have earned credit for FYW 101 or 102 may take this course only by written permission of the department chair. Students must complete FYW 100 with a grade of "C" or better to register for FYW 101.

Credit Hours: 4

FYW 101 Writing and Inquiry

Writing and Inquiry invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts. During the writing process, students will consider their own and others' perspectives on a variety of vital personal, historical, philosophical, and social issues. Taking their own experiences and their peers' perspectives as credible sources of knowledge, students will expand their inquiries beyond the personal into complex discussions in academic, literary and public textual forms. Students will also practice appropriate use and critique of technology, using digital sources as support for their arguments and grounds for further inquiry. Students must complete FYW 101 with a grade of "C" or better to register for AWR 201.

Credit Hours: 4

FYW 110 English for Non-Native Speakers I

This course is designed to develop and improve writing skills for students for whom English is a second language. Students may be required to take FYW 110 before enrolling in FYW 101 (see statement on placement testing in English in the Academic Programs section of the catalog). The professor also may recommend that a student take FYW 111 before enrolling in FYW 101. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to register for FYW 101. This course may not be used to fulfill the general distribution requirement.

Credit Hours: 4

FYW 111 English for Non-Native Speakers II

This course is designed to develop and improve writing skills for students for whom English is a second language. Students may be required to take FYW 110 before enrolling in FYW 101 (see statement on placement testing in English in the Academic Programs section of the catalog). The professor also may recommend that a student take FYW 111 before enrolling in FYW 101. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to register for FYW 101. This course may not be used to fulfill the general distribution requirement.


Credit Hours: 4

GEO 102 World Regional Geography

An introductory study with major attention to the principles and concepts of the subject.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

GEO 202 Physical Geography

Landforms, soil, flora, fauna, climate, water, minerals and the forces that shape earth's physical geography. Understanding latitude, longitude and the use of maps in the study of physical geography.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

GEO 205 Principles of Resource Utilization

Preservation, conservation and exploitation of natural resources. Survey of global resources and their influence on society.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

GEO 207 Economic Geography

A survey of the resources, industry and commerce of the United States and foreign countries.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

GER 101 Elementary German I

Beginning German with an emphasis on German culture, as well as understanding and speaking German in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students with 2+ years of high school German.

GER 102 Elementary German II

 Beginning German with an emphasis on German culture, as well as understanding and speaking German in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

GER 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of German.

GER 201 Intermediate German I

Develops a greater understanding of German culture and everyday German, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

GER 102 (or eqivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of German.

GER 202 Intermediate German II

Develops a greater understanding of German culture and everyday German, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

GER 201 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of German.

GER 251-259 Topics in German

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

GER 351-359 Topics in German

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

GTW 101 Gateways

Gateways is a required course for all incoming first-year students. Students learn the necessary skills for college success, including course planning, time management, study skills, personal and relationship issues, and student organization involvement. Grades in Gateways classes are awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1

GTW 102 Gateways II

Gateways II is a required course for all second-semester freshmen. The course emphasizes career and major decision-making, as well as career exploration activities, preparing students for a future beyond college. Grades in Gateways classes are awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1

GTW 103 Academic Development and Success for Transfer Students

An elective course for all first semester transfer students regardless of age or previous college level course work. The fundamental goal of this course is to help transfer students (1) make a successful transition from another institution of higher learning to UT, (2) make the transition more meaningful and successful, and (3) integrate the student into the UT community of learners. Students learn the necessary skills for successful transition to college life at UT, including college success strategies, schedule and degree planning, student involvement, as well as career and major decision-making. Grades in Gateways classes are awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1

GTW 104 Academic Development and Leadership for Veterans

Academic Development and Leadership for Veterans is a course for all first semester, undergraduate military veterans regardless of age or previous college level course work. The fundamental goal of this course is to help make the transition from being a military veteran to college student more meaningful and successful, as well as to integrate the student into the UT community. Students learn the necessary skills for successful transition to college life at UT, including course planning and student organization involvement, as well as career and major decision-making. Grades in Gateways classes are awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1

GWA 100 Introduction to Government and World Affairs

Covers the essential elements of political science from a national and international perspective.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

GWA 200 American Government

Covers the political processes, institutions and policies of the national political system of the United States.

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 201 World Affairs

An exploration of the political, economic and social processes between and among actors in the global community.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

GWA 202 International Political Economy

Introduces the contours of the international economic system, including issues of dependency, aid, trade, multinational corporations and the politics of economic exchange.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 203 Political Parties and Interest Groups

Studies the organization and functions of political parties and interest groups, primarily in the political system of the United States.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 206 Contemporary Latin America

This course analyzes the cultural, economic, social and political dimensions of Latin America. Focuses primarily on how several broad issues shape contemporary Latin America.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 207 The Urban World

An overview of the courses and consequences of urbanization in the United States, Western Europe and developing countries, integrating economic, geographical, political and sociological perspectives.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 210 Urban Politics and Policy

Covers political processes, institutions and policies of urban political systems in the United States.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 217 Law and Society

What is the relationship and role of law in a society? The rule of law, through constitutions, guarantees that there are realms that are unfettered by politics. Political tolerance ensures equal access to the political process and a fair judicial process. Legitimacy, the voluntary relationship between the citizen and the state, depends on public perceptions of the law, the state and its judicial institutions. These questions will be considered in terms of topics ranging from procedural justice, economics, rights and even social movements.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 220 The Congress and the Presidency

Studies legislative and executive roles and interactions in the national government of the United States.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 270 Research Methods for Government and World Affairs

Trains students in the methods of research relevant to the field of government and world affairs. Examines the entire research process from initial conception to final production.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 280 Introduction to Peace Studies

An introduction to peace studies with a focus on the meanings and nature of peace and non-peace, the origins and causes of conflict and war, and the quest for achieving peace.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 290-299 Special Studies

Special courses are offered each year.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 302 Modern Legal and Political Thought

Studies the major political and legal ideas that have shaped the contemporary world, including democracy, fascism, conservatism, classical and reform liberalism, socialism, communism, feminism and environmentalism.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 303 The Politics and History of Tampa

This course explores the development of political, social and economic structures of the city of Tampa since the 19th century.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 304 Public Policy Analysis

Studies the formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 305 Nuclear Proliferation and Nonproliferation

Examines the origins of the drive for nuclear weapons, the history of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, and incentives and disincentives for nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation. Analyzes current nuclear weapons states, "threshold" states, and states that purposefully chose to forgo nuclear weapons development.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 306 Politics of the Family

This course examines the interplay between politics, policy and family life. The course looks at how family and gender roles impact political involvement, as well as how public policies shape family life, gender roles and support for dependents. The course will look at the politics of family in the United States and a wide variety of countries around the world. Students will have opportunities to develop their analytical writing and research skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 314 U.S. National Security Policy

Examines the process and substance of U.S. national security policy, including institutional settings and specific policy problems.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 326 Political Campaigns and Electoral Politics

An exploration of the electoral process, particularly in the United States, with emphasis on the role of communication in political campaigns.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224, GWA 100 or GWA 200.

GWA 340 The European Union

This course analyzes the EU in three inter-related parts: historical and theoretical approaches to understanding the EU, institutional design of the EU, and policy making within the EU. The course is also designed to give students practice in different types of writing, including formal and informal writing assignments.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 341 International Relations of East Asia

This course examines patterns of conflict and cooperation in Northeast Asia from the perspective of competing theories of international relations. Topics include the changing regional balance of power, nuclear weapons, territorial disputes, conflicts over historical memory, alliance systems, trade relations, human rights and the role of U.S. foreign policy and military bases in the region.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 342 The Political Economy of Latin America

Examines political cultures, processes, institutions and policies in selected Latin American political systems.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 343 Third World Political and Economic Development

Examines the political and economic problems facing developing Third World states.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 344 The Political Economy of Africa

Examines the political and economic problems and opportunities facing the continent of Africa; the African colonial experience and its impact on modern African development; and how the continent has struggled with political and economic trends over the past 40 years.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 345 Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

Examines the politics of this diverse region straddling the nexus of Africa, Europe and Asia. Topics explored include Islam and politics, governance, the oil economy, war and peace in a volatile region, and prospects for the future in a globalizing world.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 346 International Organization

This course examines the role of international organizations in facilitating cooperation between states to achieve commonly held goals such as peace and prosperity. The course introduces competing theories of international organization and their applications to international organizations spanning fields such as security, trade, the environment and human rights. The course also is designed to help students develop analytical writing skills and research methods for the study of international organization.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NW) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 350 Politics of Identity

Examines the roles identities like nationality, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, class, culture and species have played historically and contemporaneously in domestic and international politics. The course addresses these topics both through canonical theories and through case studies that span the globe. We explore various understandings of these identities ranging from those that assume them to be fixed and primordial to those that view them as socially constructed and contestable.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 355 NGOs and Global Civil Society

This course offers an overview of how nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and other non-state actors in the international arena communicate, organize and advocate on behalf of individuals and interests that are overlooked by states, or run counter to national interests. The course will focus on how issues are framed and campaigns are waged by NGOs and advocacy networks in order to compel states or intergovernmental institutions to change behavior or policies.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 365 Politics of East Asia

Examines post-1950 politics of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, focusing on common themes of democratization, economic development, elite politics, political culture, foreign policy and human rights. Analytical writing is the primary form of course evaluation.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 370 American Judicial Politics

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the organization of American courts, both state and federal, their role in society, the processes in practice through which judges act, and their impact on politics.  We will also compare the reality of how judges behave to society’s myths and expectations about how they should function as well as the limits of what can and should be expected of courts and judges.  A central theme will be to analyze judges as political players who have a profound impact on the development and implementation of public policy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 375 Constitutional Law I: Institutional Powers

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the laws and jurisprudence of the United States government and Constitution.  We will study the development of constitutional jurisprudence in a variety of areas within institutional powers (such as judicial power, legislative power, executive power, federalism, regulatory power, property rights and economic liberties) with an eye towards legal and political explanations for changes in and development of the case law.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 376 Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Liberties

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the laws and jurisprudence of the United States government and Constitution.  We will study the development of constitutional jurisprudence in a variety of areas within civil rights and liberties (such as due process, obtaining evidence, right of privacy, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and equal protection) with an eye towards legal and political explanations for changes in and development of the case law.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 380 Political Psychology

An analysis of psychological perspectives of personality, information processing, and decision making as it applies to mass and elite political behavior.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100 and GWA 200

GWA 402 Constitutional Law and the Supreme Court

A study of the federal judiciary system and federal courts, their roles in relation to the executive and legislative branches of government, and the constitutional aspects of discrimination, privacy and procedural due process.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 409 Comparative Legal Systems: Western Europe

A comparative examination of the institutions, structure and sources of law in the Continental and Anglo-American legal systems, as well as in the European Union.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 410 International Law

Concentrates on public international law, examining the legal and political framework by which international legal instruments are created, litigated and enforced across national boundaries. Makes limited reference to private international law.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 412 Comparative Judicial Politics

This course examines courts from a comparative perspective and the variations in role, autonomy, power and accountability of courts and judges in both democratic and authoritarian regimes. Theories of judicial behavior and the impact of institutional arrangements contribute to the growing power of courts and the judicialization of politics that has occurred around the world. The course will give particular attention to the fundamental role of courts across societies including those of common, civil, Chinese and Islamic law.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (IG)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 413-425 Topics in Government and World Affairs

Involves selected topics in political science. Content varies; may be repeated for credit if subject matter is not repeated.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 426 Public Opinion, the Media and Power

Examines public opinion from a variety of perspectives, providing students with the ability to be intelligent consumers of public opinion research and effective users of public opinion research tools. Explores the interaction between the media and public opinion, as well as public opinion's effects on contemporary society and politics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201. Junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

GWA 440 Field Work Intern Program

Involves practical experience in government or politics at the local, state or national level. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 2-16

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWA 450 Independent Study

Involves guided readings, research and criticism.  Independent studies must be under the direction of a full-time GWA professor.  Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

12 hours of government and world affairs and a minimum 3.0 GPA.

GWA 451 Senior Thesis

Involves a major research paper planned and written with possible publication in mind.  A senior thesis must be written under the direction of any full-time GWA professor.  Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201. Senior standing and a minimum 3.25 GPA or membership in the Honors Program.

GWA 492 Development Strategies and Projects in Africa: A Travel Course to Ghana

Through class readings, films, discussions and a travel component, this course focuses on development as part of an academic discourse and as an underlying assumption behind applied service projects. Students begin by questioning what development is and who defines it, and they explore who benefits from it. They then read about a wide range of development projects and evaluate them for effectiveness. Finally, students and residents of the poor and rural villages of Nabdam, Ghana, put together developmentally oriented service projects and implement them during a trip to Ghana.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

GWA 100, GWA 200 or GWA 201

GWAH 212 Decision-Making in the United Nations (Honors)

This course prepares students participating at the Harvard National Model United Nations (HNMUN) for competition through the use of traditional and experiential instructional methods.  The course is offered to Honors students selected to serve as members of the University of Tampa (UT) delegation to the HNMUN. Because UT delegations only represent nonwestern counties at the HNMUN, students are further enriched through exposure to different cultures, customs, and values.

Credit Hours: 2

GWAH 265 Revolutionary Cuba: The Politics of Culture and the Culture of Politics (Honors)

In-depth analysis of Cuban culture before and after the Cuban Revolution of 1959. Consideration of current political, economic and cultural trends and their potential consequences in a post-Castro Cuba.

Credit Hours: 4
(H)

GWAH 272 Contemporary Japan (Honors)

This course provides a comprehensive survey of Japanese political economy, society, and culture from the end of the Cold War to the present day. Upon completion of the course, students will travel for two weeks to Japan to visit the cities of Tokyo and Kyoto.

Credit Hours: 4
(H) (IG) (NW) (W)

GWAH 311 Transformation in Latin America: Pre-Incan to Modern Peru (Honors)

This course offers an overview of the transformation in Latin America from Pre-Columbian civilization in the Americas, with special emphasis on Andean cultural history and the Inca Empire, to the modern state of Peru. Upon completion of the course, students will travel to the cities of Lima and Cusco in Peru for 14 days of on-site classroom instruction and guided tours of modern political and economic institutions and archaeological sites, including the Sacred Valley of the Incas and Machu Picchu.

Credit Hours: 4
(H) (NW) (IG) (W)

GWAH 345 Roots of Modern Latin American Thought: Identity, Culture, Utopia and Revolution (Honors)

The Latin American essay constitutes a unique and rich intellectual tradition that has confronted issues of race and identity, cultural expression and ideological commitment, utopian political projects and revolutionary upheavals with originality and aesthetic flair that is unmatched. This course will follow its development through the 19th and 20th centuries as a means of understanding the complexity of contemporary Latin American society and culture, and in doing so will witness from a unique vantage point the evolution and transformation of a region of the world that was the first to liberate itself from European colonialism, and that continues to recreate itself in a struggle to bring forth a unique modern civilization from the remains of conquest, genocide, revolution and globalization.

Credit Hours: 4
(H) (NW) (IG) (W)

GWAH 353 Cuba and the U.S.: Then and Now (Honors)

This travel course will introduce students to the developments, past and present, that define Cuba-U.S. relations. The course will have a strong emphasis on the historical importance of Jose Marti, Cuba’s most prominent political and literary writer. Students will learn about the conditions that lead to Castro’s revolutionary movement and the deterioration of the relationship between the two countries that culminated with the U.S. embargo. Students will also study how the animosity intensified during the Cold War and post-Cold War periods, and consider how the relationship will evolve when the Castro years come to an end.

Credit Hours: 4
(H)

HISH 232 Imperialism and Nationalism in Asia and Africa (Honors)

This course examines the British rule in India as a case study of how imperial rule is imposed and maintained, and the Indian independence movement as a model of colonial resistance.  It then examines the different imperial systems imposed on Africa, the struggle by African colonies for self-determination, and their search for identity and stability after independence.

Credit Hours: 4
(H) (W) (NW)

HISH 317 China's Revolutionary Twentieth Century

This course examines China’s revolutionary century with a particular emphasis on four definitive events: the Boxer Rebellion (1900), the Communist revolution (1934-1949), the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) and the 1989 Democracy Movement. It explores both the cause and course of these revolutions, how they become embedded in cultural memory and the ways in which they shaped state-society power relationships.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW), (W)

HISH 319 Mistaken Identities: Myths and Realities of the New World Encounter (Honors)

The term “discovery” is an ambivalent and charged word when discussing the arrival, military occupation and colonization of the Americas during the late 15th and 16th centuries. Who discovered whom in 1492 and what were the economic, demographic, ecological, political and cultural consequences brought about by the New World/Old World encounter? How were Europe and the Americas transformed by this seminal event, and how were the foundations of modern Latin America (and modern Western civilization) laid during this fascinating period? These questions and many others will be studied and analyzed through exposure to the primary texts and artifacts of that era, in an attempt to understand the Spanish and Indigenous mindset on the eve of Conquest and their mutual transformation throughout the 16th century, when a New World — a world still in formation — was born.

Credit Hours: 4
(H) (NW) (IG) (W)

HISH 327 Women and Gender East Asia Honors

This course covers both traditional and modern China and Japan. It examines why and how have Chinese and Japanese men and women created, accepted, defended, revised, or resisted various gender roles as well as how have gender constructions shaped ideas and patterns of education, sexuality, marriage, family, and work.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW), (W)

HIS 102 World History to 1500

This course examines topics from the Paleolithic Era to the dawn of the Age of Globalization, including: early foraging, pastoral, and agricultural societies; the emergence of urban societies in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; trade and cultural transmission; concepts of gender; technological transfers; and the emergence of transcontinental and global interconnections through the Saharan trade, the Pax Mongolica, and Malay, Chinese and Iberian ocean explorations. Equally importantly, the course introduces students to the methods of the historian, involving critical thinking, the analysis of source texts, and the use of evidence to address historical questions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 103 World History from 1500 to the Present

This course examines topics from the 16th through 20th centuries, including: state-building, commerce, and society in Eurasia and Africa; the creation and integration of the Atlantic World; new ideologies; industrial revolutions; changing conceptions of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and nation; political revolutions, genocides, and wars; imperialism and decolonization; and the global impact of the Cold War. Equally importantly, the course engages students in the methods of the historian, involving critical thinking, the analysis of source texts, and the use of evidence to address historical questions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 202 The United States to 1877

Surveys the cultural, political, social and economic developments in this country from the discovery of America through Reconstruction.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 203 The United States Since 1877

Surveys the urbanization and industrialization of the nation and its rise to world power.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 205 Indians/Native Americans of North America

A study of North American Indian history and culture from pre-contact times to the present. Covers Native American contributions to civilization; wars, removals and forced assimilation; and modern political activism.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 206 Slavery and Racism in the Early Americas: A Comparative Perspective

A study of the development of slavery and relations between European Americans and African Americans in British, Spanish, and Portuguese America from the beginning of European settlement in the New World until the abolition of slavery in the mid-19th century.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 212 Witchcraft and Magic in the Early Modern Atlantic World

A study of the development of witchcraft accusations, beginning with continental Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries and continuing with the later scares in England and New England. Particular emphasis will be given to international comparisons and to the changing social, cultural and economic positions of women.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

HIS 214 Russia's Modern Centuries

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, cultural and diplomatic history of Russia in the Imperial, Soviet and post-Soviet periods.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

HIS 215 Women in American History

A survey of women's accomplishments, lifestyles, changing image and struggle for equality and recognition from colonial times to the present.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 216 Economic History of the United States

A study of American economic developments and their impact on social and political conditions.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

HIS 217 China's Modern Centuries

This course surveys the interplay between China and the outside world from before the Opium War through the late Imperial period, early Republic, Nationalist regime, Japanese invasion, Nationalist-Communist civil war, and the People's Republic, to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

HIS 218 History of the Islamic World

A study of Muslims in world history from the 7th to the 21st centuries. This course explores the history of Islamic societies and of Muslims in local and global contexts, including the Middle East, Africa, Central and South Asia, and the West. The course addresses selected topics such as politics and statecraft; religious and cultural traditions and varieties; gender roles; and the challenges and choices that Muslim societies and individuals have faced in classical, early modern, and modern times. Materials include film, fiction and political writing as well as primary historical documents and secondary history textbooks.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (IG)

HIS 220 Introduction to African History

An exploration of the history of Africa from the rise of the great Sahel empires to the struggle for independence from European imperialism, with an emphasis on the period from 1500 to 1975. Major topics include the role of Islam, colonialism, nationalist movements, Pan-Africanism, decolonization and the challenges facing newly independent states and societies.


Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (IG)

HIS 221 Japan's Modern Centuries

This course surveys Japanese history from the coming of the Western gunboats in the 1850s through the Meiji restoration, the early development of international trade and democracy, the rise of militarism in the 1930s, World War II, the American Occupation, the economic "miracle" and the troubled 2000s.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

HIS 222 Fascism and Nazi Germany

A study of the rise and fall of the Third Reich and the legacy of Hitlerism.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 225 The Age of the Civil War

A study of mid-19th century America, with particular emphases on the political developments, changing regional economies, patterns of interracial, interethnic and interclass relationships, as well as the course of military events during the Civil War.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 227 Traditional China

This course covers an examination and analysis of traditional Chinese history.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 228 Traditional Japan

This course examines the history of Japan from its pre-historical origins until the rise of modern Japan in the mid-nineteenth century. Special focus is given to indigenous Japanese beliefs, the influence of Chinese political and social values on Japanese life, Buddhist religious culture, the military ethos of the samurai, and the material cultural and attistic achievements of the Tokugawa period. In addition to a conventional textbook, literature and film are used to immerse students in the worldviews of traditional Japan. Group work and collaborative learning is emphasized. Blackboard is used to facilitate ongoing, active engagement.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW)

HIS 229 History of Sexuality

This course surveys major trends and turning points in the history of sexuality since 1500. We will examine the governing regimes (legal, religious, medical, etc.) that defined sexual behavior and reproductive practices in mainland North America, paying particular attention to the changing relationship between sexual regulation and politics over time. The course will also explore the ways that official pronouncements differed from the actual practices and perceptions of ordinary woman and men. We will ask how factors such as race and ethnicity, class, and gender shaped sexual understandings and behavior.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 260 The Holocaust

This course covers the abuse and systematic extermination by the Nazis and their collaborators of millions of Jews, Gypsies, Slavs and other peoples of Europe. It deals with Germany and other parts of Europe under Nazi domination.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 275 The Civil Rights Movement

This course focuses on the struggle for racial equality and freedom in the American South after World War II. It also helps students comprehend this struggle within the broader context of post-Civil War American race relations.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 290-299 Special Studies

Special courses are offered each year.

Credit Hours: 2-4

HIS 296 America and Vietnam

An examination and analysis of America's role in the Vietnam Conflict.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 300 The Middle East

A study of Islamic tradition and the challenge of modernization. Covers Arab nationalism, Zionism, Pan-Arabism, Imperialism and the development of OPEC from its origin to the present. Also examines Middle Eastern lifestyles, values and economic relations.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW)

HIS 302 Revolutionary Europe 1789 to 1919

European history from the French Revolution to the Russian Revolution and the end of World War I. The rise of Nationalism, Liberal Democracy, Socialism and the vast expansion of the colonial empires in Africa and Asia are major topics of this course.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 304 History of Florida

The objectives of this course are to develop historical analysis beyond the level of the lower-division survey and to introduce students to experiential learning within the arena of local history practice. Students should master the historigraphy that structures the study of Florida’s past, gaining an awareness of how, over time, political history, social history, spatial theory and transnational studies have altered state history. Student research topics will be drawn from local history sources and celebrations, encouraging community engagement as well as independent analysis.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 305 The Ancient World

A study of Western culture in the ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 306 The Middle Ages

A study of European society from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 308 Renaissance and Reformation

A study of the origins, progress, interrelationships and impact of new forms and ideas that characterized the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe from 1400 to 1650.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 309 England and her Celtic Neighbors

A survey of English political, cultural and economic development, with emphases on the Tudor-Stuart era and the British Empire.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 312 Europe Since 1919

European history from the end of World War I to the present. The second half of the course (post-midterm) is entirely devoted to the New Europe that emerged from the ashes of World War II.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 313 Latin America

A study of Latin American history from the colonial period to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

HIS 320 Introduction to Public History

This course offers an introduction to the methods and approaches that structure the presentation of history in public venues, including museums, historic venues and archives. Tools that facilitate collaboration between historians and communities to preserve local memory will also be examined. Finally, we will explore critically the political, financial and professional pressures that have shaped some of the most prominent displays of the nation’s past as well as the pressures that structure representations of history in Tampa. Students will attempt to reconcile these concerns by crafting exhibition proposals that would allow a local museum to engage multiple history publics.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 321 Revolutionary America

A study of the history of the United States before, during and after the Revolutionary War. Focuses on the role of ideology and the patterns of change in religion, racial relations and the status of women.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

HIS 322 Spanish Caribbean and its Diasporas

This course surveys the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic) from the Taino world of the pre-Columbian period to today. Topics include the creation of colonial plantation societies and the rise of sugar and coffee economies; movements for abolition, reform, and national self-determination; the persistence of Caribbean borderlands in the U.S. gulf south; the Caribbean’s neo-imperial economies, social structures, and political institutions; the impact of the Cuban Revolution; and the Caribbean’s tourist trade and diasporas in the global economy.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (IG)

HIS 325 Narcotic Drugs and Modern Society

This course explores the history of narcotic drugs and modern society, focusing on America. The course also examines the history of U.S. drug policy.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

HIS 326 The History of U.S. Foreign Relations

Studies the formulation of American foreign policy and issues in American diplomatic history.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

HIS 330 America in the 1960s

This course covers the Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban missile crisis, the war in Vietnam, the concern about nuclear warfare, the civil rights movement, and the student movement of the late 1960s.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 401 Field Work

Involves practical work in museums, historical preservation and historical archives. Requires permission of area coordinator. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 402 Natural and Unnatural Disasters in Modern World History

This course investigates the impact of catastrophes — earthquakes, epidemics, hurricanes, fires, accidents — on society, politics and culture in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas since 1624. Natural disasters often transform relations between nations and among social groups, while revealing social conditions and cultural attitudes kept hidden under normal circumstances. Natural disasters can create the conditions for revolutions, lead to wars over scarce resources, provide pretexts for imperial intrusions and expose the inequalities and tensions in society. Students will develop their knowledge of world history and disaster studies by reading and writing about selected case studies.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (W)

Prerequisites

Any two History courses.

HIS 413 The Era of World War I

The course traces the diplomatic and economic events leading to the outbreak of war in 1914 and follows the progress of the war, revolution and peace.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

HIS 414 The Era of World War II

The course traces the political, economic, social and diplomatic events leading to the outbreak of hostilities and the military and diplomatic aspects of the war itself. It concludes with the Nuremburg Trials.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

HIS 450 Independent Study

Involves guided readings, research and criticism.  Materials covered must be different from those included in current courses.  May be repeated for credit if subject matter varies.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, 12 hours of history. Independent studies must be taken under the direction of a full-time HIS professor. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

HIS 451 Senior Thesis

A substantial research and writing project.  The subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.  A senior thesis can be written under the guidance of any full-time professor in the HIS department.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA.

HIS 460-462 Advanced Special Topics

Advanced study of a selected historical topic.  This course will count toward the upper-level requirement for the History major, and, depending on the topic, either toward the American or the Non-American Requirement.  May be repeated for credit if the topic differs.

Credit Hours: 4

HON 101 Pathways to Honors 1

Introduces the student to the Honors Program and to the Excellence in Leadership and Service (EXCELS) program. EXCELS is designed to develop leadership skills and a commitment to community service among Honors Program students. Focus is on active learning through outside-the-classroom experiences, such as community outreach and the Honors Symposia series. Graded.

Credit Hours: 1

HON 102 Pathways to Honors 2

Introduces the student to the philosophical underpinnings of the Honors Program: "Challenging Mindsets." Encourages students to explore Honors Program offerings and to continue their pursuit of experiential learning and their development of leadership skills. Graded.

Credit Hours: 1

HSC 100 Health Science

A study of wellness and concepts for developing healthy lifestyles. Covers lifestyle risk factors associated with chronic and communicable diseases.

Credit Hours: 2

HSC 130 Medical Terminology

This course introduces the student to common word roots, prefixes and suffixes used by the medical and allied health professions. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to define common medical terminology by deciphering its parts.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 150 Emergency Response

This course provides cognitive and practical training for those working in and around the allied health professions. Skill sets include advanced first aid, one-and two-responder CPR with AED training, administering supplemental oxygen, and prevention of infectious disease transmission. This course is required of those accepted into the athletic training education or pre-professional allied health program. Red Cross certification(s) in First Responder may be earned. Permission is required to enroll in this course. Lab fees for durable equipment and certification required.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 200 Introduction to Allied Health Professions

This course is required of all students enrolled in the pre-professional allied health concentration. This is an introductory course examining the various career opportunities (as recognized by the American Medical Association) within allied health. Content includes professional foci, educational requirements and career outlook, and philosophical issues in allied health.  Instructor consent is required to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 2

HSC 203 Nutrition

A study of nutritional status and the effect of eating habits and food consumption on society, families and individuals.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 220 Functional Anatomy

This is a one-semester course without lab that covers the structure and function of the human body on the cellular, systemic and organismal levels. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 230 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

A study of the structures and functions of the body, with special emphases on histology and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A study of the structure and functions of the body, with special emphases on the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiration, urinary and reproductive systems.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 230 or permission of instructor.

HSC 234 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

This laboratory course introduces the students to hands-on exercises related to the structure and function of tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems (including dissections of cats and brains as well as physiological concepts).

Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

HSC 230 or permission of instructor.

HSC 235 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

This laboratory course introduces students to hands-on exercises related to structure and function of the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems (including dissections of cats, hearts, and kidneys as well as physiological concepts).

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

HSC 230.

Corequisites

HSC 231 or permission of instructor.

HSC 236 Introduction to Public Health

This course provides the student with a clear understanding of public health: the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 350 Biostatistics

This course provides the student with an overview of health science research and data analysis, the organization and summarization of data, and drawing inferences about the characteristics of sample data. Conceptual topics include study design, descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, power and sample size, inferential statistics, and decision-making. Statistical techniques include prevalence, incidence, odds ratio, relative risk, sensitivity, specificity, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and variability, measures of bivariate association (Pearson, Spearman, Chi-square), independent samples and paired samples (t-tests), between groups design and repeated measures factor (one-way and two-way ANOVA), and linear and multiple regression.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 110 or HSC 200 or HSC 236

HSC 360 Principles of Epidemiology in Exercise and Public Health

This course provides the student with an overview of morbidity and mortality surveillance by understanding disease etiology, distribution, and control. The course focuses on disease surveillance related to exercise, rehabilitation, public and community health through both descriptive and analytical methods. Cohort, case and experimental studies will be examined in relation to prevalence, outbreak, rate adjustment and study design.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 110 or HSC 200 or HSC 236

HSC 371 Fundamentals of Pharmacology

Lecture/discussion course emphasizing an understanding of the basic principles of pharmacology specifically aimed at the needs of allied health professionals. The application of these principles to drug categories commonly encountered by allied health professionals is covered.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 150 or 152 and permission of the instructor.

HSC 375 Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course provides a strong social and behavioral theoretical foundation within the context of public health. The course will focus on critical thinking about public health issues, social determinants of health, health risk behaviors and intervention strategies. The course includes long-term trends in morbidity and mortality, social factors that correlate with these trends, and theories that attempt to explain disparities in health and status across sub-populations. The course introduces data on health risks associated with specific behaviors such as smoking, poor diet, sedentary lifestyle and substance abuse and introduce various strategic approaches for developing individual-, group- and community-based behavioral interventions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

SOC 100, HSC 236.

HSC 420 Nutritional Supplements

This course addresses contemporary issues in the usage of dietary supplements and sports performance aids, including vitamin and mineral supplements, herbs and botanicals promoted to the general public and to the athlete. The focus is to use the scientific method to evaluate product and research literature and health claims, when it is known that data are often likely to be incomplete or inconclusive. The course also reviews safety data, adverse event reports, and legal issues involving dietary supplements.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

One of the following, HSC 203, HSC 230, NUR 432, CHE 232, BIO 330, BIO 360, or permission of the instructor.

HSC 440 Health Policy and Social Change

This course provides key concepts and knowledge regarding how health policy is formulated, enacted, and implemented. The course analyzes health policy by focusing on how and why health policy is developed at the federal, state and local levels. The course begins with a brief overview of the concepts and theories associated with public policy development in the health sector. The main emphasis will be upon providing the tools with which to understand how both public and private institutions produce health policy in its various forms. This course should provide a practical background to the study of health policy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 236.

HSC 445 Health Promotion Program Planning and Evaluation

This course will introduce students to the development, implementation and evaluation strategies that address health promotion issues at multiple levels. The course will provide a strong foundation of theories and conceptual frameworks used to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion from an ecological perspective - encompassing the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, social and policy levels.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 236, HSC 375.

HSC 450 Public Health Management and Leadership

This course develops the student's ability to: 1) work with organizations and communities; 2) develop skills to mobilize resources and the organizational and community capacity to address public health challenges and achieve the national health objectives; and 3) enable participation and leadership in a network that fosters the future of public health. The course exposes students to concepts and theories of leadership, performance improvement, organizational behavior, marketing, operations, organizational strategy and continuous quality improvement. The general management perspective is emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 236.

HSC 480 Internship in Allied Health

This is an instructional, field-based experience in the allied health occupations for the pre-professionals. Both directed and self-directed experiences are required under the supervision of a certified/licensed allied health care practitioner in an approved health care setting. Students must earn program coordinator approval, provide documentation of current immunizations, health screening and CPR certification, and make provisions for transportation to the clinical affiliation site. Minimum allowable number of clinical contact hours is 120. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 2-12

Prerequisites

Junior or senior status, minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, permission of instructor and departmental approval.

HSC 490 Internship in Public Health

This course integrates public health theory and practice in a professional setting. Students have the opportunity to apply concepts from core and concentration courses, conduct projects and interact with a range of health professionals. The student works with both faculty adviser and an academically and professionally qualified preceptor. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 semester hours.

Credit Hours: 2-12

Prerequisites

Instructor permission.

HSC 491 Seminar in Allied Health

This course encompasses professional topics and current issues in the allied health professions. A seminar style class including discussions, reviews of current literature, case studies, and journal article critiques will be conducted.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Junior or Senior status; Allied Health major; instructor permission.

HSC 499 Special Topics in Allied Health

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Science and Human Performance Department. Subjects may focus on topics of current interest in the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours:

HSC 608 Research Methods in Health Science

This course will cover research designs and research methods for exercise and health related studies. In particular, this course will focus on qualitative, quantitative and mixed method research designs, data collection techniques and statistical analyses. This course builds on the basic knowledge of biostatistics to explore more advanced research analysis techniques with both parametric and nonparametric data. This course will enable the student to develop instruments that align with specific research questions/hypotheses.  Students will become knowledgeable of mixed methods research and a greater understanding of the usage of one design informing the other for more robust research endeavors.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 350 or equivalent. Graduate students or by instructor permission.

HSC 618 Professional Issues and the Practitioner

This course encompasses professional topics and current issues in exercise and nutrition science.  A seminar style class including discussions, reviews of current literature, case studies, and journal article critiques will be conducted.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, or by special instructor permission.

HSC 627 Sports Supplements and Ergogenic Aids

This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of nutritional supplementation as it applies to body composition, performance (strength, endurance, power), and general health.  The course will cover the major supplements touted to enhance energy, fat loss, strength, muscle, endurance, inflammatory status, and the overall hormonal milieu.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 203 and ESC 380. Graduate students or by instructor permission.

HSC 635 Special Topics in Exercise and Nutrition Science

This course is an exploration of one or more special topics in Exercise and Nutrition Science.  This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of a specialized field in sports and/or nutrition as provided by a visiting professor to University of Tampa.  May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and ESC 460. Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 637 Sports Nutrition

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced understanding of the role that nutrition plays in the acute and chronic response to exercise.  In depth discussion of the macro and micro nutrients are discussed as they relate to exercise and sport.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and HSC 200. Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission

HSC 690 Practicum

The practicum provides clinical field based experiences in preparation for employment in the exercise and nutrition science related professions.  Graduate students will gain insight into various practices, disciplines, techniques, administrative duties and clinical processes related to exercise and nutrition science.  Graduate students will provide documentation of their experience.  Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

By permission of the Instructor.

HSC 699 Comprehensive Exam

This course includes the master’s program comprehensive exam which must be satisfactorily completed to graduate with the MS Exercise and Nutrition Science degree.  The course also includes review for the comprehensive exam.  Satisfactory completion of this course will also help prepare those students who plan to take Certified Sports Nutritionist Exam (CISSN) offered by the International Society of Sports Nutrition but passage of the CISSN exam is not required for graduation from the MS program.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of all core courses in the MS Exercise & Nutrition Science program with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater. By permission of the Program Director.

IBS 490 International Business Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May be used to satisfy the cross-cultural experience requirement of the IB major. Approval of the international business coordinator required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MGT 350, junior or senior standing and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

IBS 492T Seminar in International Business

Examines select economic, political and cultural aspects of specific countries through readings, lectures, research and travel abroad. Country selection varies with instructor. Travel abroad includes visits to foreign stock exchanges, universities, corporations and international organizations. The trip is required for course credit, and the cost of the trip is not included in tuition. May require class meetings during the last seven weeks of the spring semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

IBS 495 Special Topics in International Business

A course offered at the discretion of the Department of International Business. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

IBS 499 Independent Study in International Business

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 0-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the coordinator of international business and COB associate dean.

IBS 695 Special Topics in International Business

For graduate students only.  A course offered at the discretion of the coordinator of international business. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

IBS 699 Independent Study in International Business

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in international business.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA, written permission of department chair.

IST 205 Contemporary Europe

This course analyzes the cultural, economic and political spheres of Europe in the wake of the European Union, the demise of the Cold War and broad globalization trends.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

IST 206 Contemporary Latin America

This course analyzes the cultural, economic, social and political dimensions of Latin America. Primary focus is on the ways in which several broad issues have shaped contemporary Latin America.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

IST 218 History of the Islamic World

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

IST 270 Introduction to International Studies Research Methods

Introduction to essential skills and critical issues in international studies research.

Credit Hours: 2
(IG)

IST 290-299 Special Studies

Special courses are offered each year, including travel abroad experience. Check descriptions published annually.

Credit Hours: 2-4

IST 470 Senior Research Seminar in International Studies

A capstone course for international and cultural studies majors that focuses on the analysis of proposed solutions to contemporary global issues.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

ITA 101 Elementary Italian I

Beginning Italian with an emphasis on Italian culture, as well as understanding and speaking Italian in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Italian. Not open to students who have taken 2+ years of high school Italian.

ITA 102 Elementary Italian II

Beginning Italian with an emphasis on Italian culture, as well as understanding and speaking Italian in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Italian.

ITA 201 Intermediate Italian I

 Develops a greater understanding of Italian culture and everyday Italian, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 102 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

ITA 202 Intermediate Italian II

Develops a greater understanding of Italian culture and everyday Italian, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 201 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of Italian.

ITA 251-259 Topics in Italian

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ITA 351-359 Topics in Italian

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ITM 220 Management Information Systems

This course studies the integration of information systems solutions and business processes. Topics include how information and information systems relate to business processes; how organizations use information systems for competitive strategy, supply chain and resource management; and how information systems are developed and managed. The ethical implications of information systems and international dimensions of information systems use are also covered. Students apply knowledge acquired in this course to use contemporary software applications and an enterprise resource planning simulation to run their own simulated company.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 101.

ITM 251 Application Development

Studies the fundamental concepts of designing and writing computer programs to solve problems. Emphasizes structured programming and object-oriented methods in the .NET environment. Includes Web-based client-server application development using contemporary programming tools.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 280 IT Infrastructure

This course provides an introduction to IT infrastructure for students majoring in management information systems. Topics covered include computer and systems architecture, communication networks and the services and capabilities enabled by IT infrastructure solutions in an organization. It gives students the knowledge and skills they need for communicating effectively with professionals whose special focus is on hardware and systems software technology, and for designing organizational processes and software solutions that require in-depth understanding of the IT infrastructure capabilities and limitations. The course focuses on Internet-based solutions, computer and network security, business continuity, and the role of infrastructure in regulatory compliance.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 318 Systems Analysis and Design

This course introduces students to analysis and design of business information systems. The course addresses the key concepts of user requirements, modeling and information systems project management. The course covers object-oriented requirements modeling approaches. A semester-long project provides students with the opportunity to integrate concepts in analyzing and designing an information system using a prototyping approach with a rapid application development tool. The project management component of the course exposes students to project feasibility analysis, project tracking, developing service requests and reporting minutes of meetings.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 319 Business Process Integration Using Enterprise Systems

This course focuses on integration of business processes across different functional areas in an organization. Students will learn about enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and their role in integrating business processes within and across organizations. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn how to configure business processes within an organization using a contemporary ERP system, SAP. The course provides students an opportunity to study and compare integration of business processes using ERP systems in two organizations which culminates in a research paper and presentation to the class. Case studies, business simulation, and business process modeling are used to enhance student understanding.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220, ACC 203.

ITM 350 IS Security and Risk Management

This course introduces students to the concepts of Information Systems (IS) security and development of organizational policies to implement IS security controls. IS security architecture and design, network, application and information security are examined. Security threats and vulnerabilities that affect different IS are identified and methods for controlling those threats are discussed. The students learn how IS security risk can be measured and subsequently managed through the process of business continuity planning and disaster preparedness. The course concludes by examining the standards in IS security and current regulatory and ethical considerations pertaining to IS security and risk management.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 360 Advanced Application Development

This course emphasizes advanced programming concepts, development of web-based client server applications and integration of applications with enterprise systems. Topics include contemporary languages and methodologies used in the business community to support interoperable computer-to-computer interaction over a network. Students complete hands-on exercises, expand their personal e-portfolio of professional skills, and participate in an experiential learning project with an outside organization.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251.

ITM 361 Operations Management

This course examines the short-and long-term decisions that are made in manufacturing and service systems relating to the operations function. Emphasis is placed upon maximizing productivity, improving quality and discussing key issues within operations which are of relevance in a firm’s ability to remain competitive in a global economy. The course also covers global supply chain management aspects such as outsourcing/offshoring and strategic use of information systems. Students are given realistic exercises and gain hands-on experience using a contemporary enterprise information system.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COB core requirements and MGT 330.

ITM 408 Data and Information Management

Studies fundamental concepts of data and information management with primary focus on database systems, including identifying organizational requirements, conceptual data modeling, logical and physical database design, SQL and database administration tasks. Other topics include business intelligence technologies, data quality management and emerging trends. This course requires completion of an application prototype on a currently popular DBMS.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 410 Advanced IT Infrastructure

An in-depth study of IT infrastructure, network design and management. Additional topics include network security, virtualization, cloud computing and emerging IT technologies. Course includes hands-on experience designing and installing a small network.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 280.

ITM 419 Enterprise Architecture and Governance

The course continues with systems development in an enterprise environment with an emphasis on governance and strategy.  The course focuses on topics such as developing system and network architectures, capturing data, process and security requirements, designing user interfaces and documentation, implementing systems and planning for transition and training.  Moreover, the course covers international governance standards using case examples from global companies.  Governance topics include global strategy development, business alignment, strategic planning and other IS frameworks.  The course provides students with the opportunity to earn the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) designation, an internationally recognized professional certification.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251 and ITM 318. Pre or Co-Requisite ITM 408.

ITM 466 Business Intelligence and Analytics

The course focuses on the use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, and explanatory and predictive models to generate data-driven insight for decision-making and competitive strategy. Students gain knowledge and skills to manipulate and analyze large data sets. Topics include the strategic value of business intelligence and analytics, relevant concepts related to databases and data warehouses, data and text mining techniques, and business applications of data mining and analytics. Students use software tools to analyze large data sets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 210 and ITM 220.

ITM 490 Internship in Information and Technology Management

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with overall minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

ITM 495 Special Topics in Information and Technology Management

A course offered at the discretion of the ITM department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ITM 499 Independent Study in Information and Technology Management

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of department chair and associate dean.

ITM 608 Information Systems and Operations Management

For graduate students only. This course provides an integrated view of managing information systems and operations. Case studies and the SAP enterprise system are used to address key concepts. The course covers the strategic use and development of information systems as well as providing hands-on experience with enterprise systems. Emphasis is placed on managing the supply chain and its impact on strategic planning. The course addresses each element in the operation of a successful supply chain including having the right quantity, quality, location, time, price and information at each stage of the supply chain process. Both classroom and alternative instructional methods may be employed.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500, ACC 500, FIN 500, MKT 500, MGT 500, and ECO 500.

ITM 614 Effective Project Management

For graduate students only. This course is a study of project management using the systems approach to problem solving. This course covers the nine project management knowledge areas. Contemporary project management software is used to illustrate all concepts. The course covers management of multiple projects, new product development, and large technology programs. Information-processing methods such as the Design Structure Matrix are used to analyze task dependencies. Methods for managing uncertainty in project management are covered. Students use case studies, readings and software applications to learn the sophisticated techniques and management designs used to effectively manage risk and uncertainty, financial exposure and human constraints.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

ITM 615 Business Analytics

For graduate students only. Leading companies compete on analytics. This course focuses on using data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive models, and data-driven insight to support decision-making and actions. Students gain knowledge and skills to manipulate and analyze large data sets for the purpose of business intelligence and decision-making. Topics include the strategic value of analytics and building analytical capabilities, relevant concepts related to databases and data warehouses, data and text mining techniques, and business applications of data mining and analytics. Students apply analytic technologies to explore and analyze large data sets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500.

ITM 619 Enterprise Systems

For graduate students only. This course examines enterprise system concepts with a focus on understanding how enterprise systems integrate information across business functional areas. Students will learn the fundamentals of a current Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) application (SAP). The use of enterprise systems at both the transaction processing level and the managerial level is covered. Case studies, business simulation, and hands-on exercises with an enterprise system are used to enhance student understanding. Configuration of an enterprise system for business processes is covered. Students will prepare a comparative analysis of two enterprise systems.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 608.

ITM 630 Managing the IT Organization

For graduate students only. The course presents an integrated approach to managing IT organization by guiding the participant though a process of effectively aligning, investing, measuring, deploying and sustaining the strategic and tactical direction of IT organizations in 21st-century businesses. The course leverages and integrates current and emerging industry best practices, standards guidelines and leading company case studies. Students will learn how to develop and evaluate an IT management plan by studying an IT organization in a contemporary business as part of the semester-long project.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 608.

ITM 635 Managing Innovation

For graduate students only. This course focuses on innovation's role in 21st-century organizations. It addresses the need for a systemic approach to building innovation capabilities and the challenges of integrating the many facets of innovation management. Leading innovators and building innovative organizations are covered from both a theoretical and applied approach. Topics addressed include fundamental theories of innovation; developing an innovation strategy; innovation as a business process; the role of the innovation context including leadership and organization, culture and values, people and skills, and processes and tools; and assessing and improving innovation performance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

ITM 690 Internship in Information and Technology Management

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy up to two hours of practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval of the graduate office, the college internship coordinator and the associate dean.

ITM 695 Special Topics in Information and Technology Management

A course offered at the discretion of the ITM department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ITM 699 Independent Study in Information and Technology Management

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in information systems and technology management.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

JOU 101 Introduction to Journalism

This course explores the role and function of journalism, its evolution throughout history, and how it is practiced in different media and in different parts of the world. The basic principles, related legal issues and ethics of journalism are also examined, with an emphasis on journalism's transition in the new media age.

Credit Hours: 4

JOU 213 Travel Writing

Students will explore the art of travel writing, using the techniques of creative nonfiction and journalism. They will learn to incorporate fact and research into pieces that include narrative, interview and reflection. They will reflect the intersection of people and places, while exploring their own relationship to the experiences. Assignments may include the critique of food, architecture and music; political analysis; and description of natural environs. May count in the humanities distribution in the Baccalaureate Core if not used for the Journalism or Writing major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W) (IG) (NW)

JOU 221 Multimedia Journalism I: The Digital Tool Kit

This course teaches the basics of capturing and editing sound, photographs and moving images for a journalistic purposes, with a focus on producing content for the Web. Students will learn to tell multi-platform stories using simple, portable equipment and software that makes up the “tool kit” for today's versatile reporters. They also will be introduced to the ethical and legal dimensions of capturing sound and images in public spaces and to alternative storytelling techniques.

Credit Hours: 4

JOU 271 News Reporting and Writing

This course provides a hands-on practice of journalism, in which students learn reporting and information-gathering techniques, develop interviewing skills and write frequent news stories with varying angles and subjects. Students will also learn to be fair and objective in their reporting.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and JOU 101, or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 273 Practicum in Student Publications

A supervised practical experience on a student publication. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Students may enroll for credit as follows: editor in chief, managing editor and section editors (up to 4 credit hours);  writers, assistant section editors and other staff (photo, video, advertising) from 1 to 2 credit hours.  No student may receive more than 4 credit hours of credit in student publications in any one semester. May be repeated for a maximum of the following semester hours of credit: Minaret, 8; Moroccan, 8; Quilt, 6.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor. Not recommended for first-semester freshmen.

JOU 290-299 Special Topics in Journalism

Specialized study of a topic and/or area of journalism. The course may be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201.

JOU 304 Multimedia Journalism II: The Converged Newsroom

This course focuses on digital reporting and storytelling tools and methods, building on the training provided in Multimedia Journalism I. The latest video journalism, audio journalism, data journalism, photojournalism, web writing and social media skills will be explored, along with issues involving multimedia journalism ethics and the law.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; JOU 221 or COM 241 and JOU 271.

JOU 371 Feature Writing

An advanced journalism class that focuses on writing longer feature stories of greater complexity than the news stories in JOU 271. Involves extensive writing assignments of the kind that appears in print or online magazines. Students will study important genres in those publications and learn how to complement their own stories with additional elements, such as sidebars, forming editorial packages. May count toward the humanities distribution in the baccalaureate core if not used for the journalism or writing major.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; and JOU 101 and JOU 271, or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 390-399 Advanced Special Topics in Journalism

Advanced study of a topic and/or area of journalism. The course may be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; JOU 271 or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 485-489 Directed Writing in Journalism

Independent study and advanced training in journalism, which could include reporting, feature writing and/or multimedia, with emphasis on flexibility and practicality of topic and focus. Reading and writing assignments are agreed upon by the individual student and professor. May be repeated if content varies. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

JOU 221, JOU 271, JOU 371.

JOU 490 Journalism Studies: Career Internship for Journalism Majors

Internships acquaint students with careers and professions in their major and demonstrate to students how their special skills can be used in these environments. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours, 4 of which may count toward the journalism major.  May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Permission of the student's adviser and the department chair are required.

JOU 499 Journalism Colloquium/Portfolio

This course is a requirement for journalism majors, offered in their final semesters, with the goal of preparing them for the post-graduation opportunities and challenges of the journalism craft and an industry in transition. Working professionals give workshops on best practices and the latest issues and developments in the media industries.  Students also compile and submit a portfolio of their best work (in all media) from each year of study.  A preface should include a discussion of the student's growth as a reporter, writer, and multimedia journalist.  Program faculty members evaluate portfolios and select the most distinguished for awards.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Senior standing in journalism.

JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Not open to students with 2+ years of high school Japanese.

JPN 102 Elementary Japanese II

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Japanese.

JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 102 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Japanese.

JPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 201 (or equivalent skills.) Not open to native speakers of Japanese.

JPN 251-259 Topics in Japanese:

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor.

JPN 351-359 Topics in Japanese:

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor.

JPN 451-459 Topics in Japanese

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor

LAN 100 Language and Culture

An introduction to the language and culture of the different ethnic groups in the United States. Content and emphasis vary. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only.  May be repeated when content varies.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of the language being studied.

LAN 105 Language For Travel

Designed to give students the ability to communicate on a basic level in a given language. Materials facilitate the practice of speaking and listening skills, emphasizing the situations one would encounter while traveling. Includes information about cross-cultural communication. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Not open to students with previous experience in the language being offered.

LAN 110 Basic American Sign Language I

Beginning American sign language with emphases on structure, basic vocabulary and an introduction to manual communication systems. Includes the psychology, socioeconomics and philosophies of education of the deaf in the United States, as well as an explanation of the field of interpreting and historical notes on sign languages worldwide.

Credit Hours: 4

LAN 111 Basic American Sign Language II

Beginning American sign language with emphases on structure, basic vocabulary and an introduction to manual communication systems. Includes the psychology, socioeconomics and philosophies of education of the deaf in the United States, as well as an explanation of the field of interpreting and historical notes on sign languages worldwide.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

LAN 110

LAN 151-159 Topics in Language

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG) (NW) when appropriate.

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LAN 200 Studies in Language

Directed, independent study of a subject chosen from a language such as Latin or another Romance language or dialect. Materials covered must be different from those in current courses.

Credit Hours: 1-4

LAN 251-259 Topics in Language

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I

Beginning Latin with an emphasis on ancient Roman culture. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II

Beginning Latin with an emphasis on ancient Roman culture. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

LAT 101 or equivalent skills.

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

LAT 102 or equivalent skills.

LAT 202 Intermediate Latin II

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

LAT 201 or equivalent skills.

LAT 251-259 Topics in Latin

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LAT 351-359 Topics in Latin

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LED 099 Experiences in Leadership Studies

LED 099 is designed to provide academic structure for students completing their experiential requirements to fulfill their leadership development plan. In consultation with their leadership adviser, LED 099 designates students who are pursuing the Leadership Studies minor. It also provides a record of progress toward completing their experiential activities requirements.

Credit Hours: 0

LED 200 Introduction to Leadership Studies

This course is designed for students interested in learning more about the nature of leadership. Over the course of the semester, we will look at leadership from the individual, group, organizational and global perspectives. The course will demonstrate the interrelatedness of an individual with the community/organization and the skills necessary for leading in a global society.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Acceptance into the leadership minor program.

LED 450 Capstone in Leadership Studies

Provides an in-depth understanding of how leaders ethically mobilize resources to be effective in their roles. This course examines how power and influence are acquired, retained and used in organizations. In addition, the course explores the effect of power followers and the overall performance of the organization. Students learn through a variety of experiential exercises and case studies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Enrollment in leadership minor, LED 200 and completion of LED 099 sequence.

LIN 151-159 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 210 Basic Linguistics

An introduction to the study and description of language according to the principles of modern linguistics.

Credit Hours: 4

LIN 217 ESOL Foundations

This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers at the undergraduate level with a knowledge base in applied linguistics; a broad understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the field of second language acquisition; and familiarity with issues in culture, cross-cultural communication, language instruction, and assessment in order to meet the educational, linguistic, and cultural needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) as mandated by the ESOL Consent Decree in the state of Florida. The course will address theoretical constructs of the field as well as exemplify research-based practical applications in the classroom for meeting the academic and communication needs of English Language Learners.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Education majors only.

LIN 251-259 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 310 Applied Linguistics

This course deals with principles of linguistics, methodologies employed by linguists working in linguistic variation in diverse contexts significant across social/ethnic/cultural strata and domains of interaction, and application in the professional setting. Includes, language acquisition, learning and teaching, and the psychology of language.

Credit Hours: 4

LIN 320 Second-Language Acquisition

Students will learn about theories and research of second language acquisition.  This course is designed for students who may have an interest in teaching a second language.  Some topics covered will be language acquisition., language production and instruction.
Credit Hours: 4

LIN 351-359 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 451-459 Topics of Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIT 116 Writing on Cultures: Concepts of Primary Research

This course explores the concepts of doing primary research on target cultures, as well as ethical issues involved in performing such research. It may be taught on-site in an international setting. In addition, the course provides students opportunities to perform primary (firsthand) research and gain field experience on an issue of their choice that is related to the culture or community being studied. For example, students can investigate a particular environmental or social issue pertinent to the setting, culture or community.

Credit Hours: 1-4

LIT 117 War in Literature and Film

Explores the vicarious experience of warfare and the practical and moral problems associated with command.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

LIT 126 Literature and Film Classics

A study of the techniques, history and development of selected literature and film classics. Content may vary depending on instructor.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

LIT 140 Introduction to the Novel

An introduction to one of the most popular literary genres, the novel, with particular focus on the varied relations novelists establish between individual and society, audience and storyteller, to entertain, unsettle and inspire readers.

Credit Hours: 4

LIT 150 Introduction to Poetry

This course will investigate the roots, elements and nature of poetry in an effort to make poetry a rich source of pleasure for a lifetime. We will read poetry of all types from all ages, with an emphasis on modern and contemporary.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

LIT 170 Stories and Wellness

A thematically organized course that studies the power of stories from many narrative traditions - European, Chinese, Zen Buddhist, Native American - to promote good health and healing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

LIT 175 Ethical Questions and Modern Drama

This course deals with significant modern plays in which the conflict centers on ethical questions across a broad range of University subjects: business, science, politics, and relations with and responsibilities to others. Classroom sessions and papers will address the plays first as works of literature but will go on to discuss and debate the ethical issues involved.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

LIT 200 Introduction to Shakespeare

An introduction to the plays and poems of William Shakespeare, including a survey of the texts and an introduction to the staging and poetry of the work. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the work and techniques of a great poet and playwright. For English and writing majors, it is essential. For all students, a familiarity with Shakespeare is a cornerstone of a well-rounded liberal arts education.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 201 World Literature I

A survey of major world authors from the ancient world through the Renaissance.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (W)

LIT 202 World Literature II

A survey of major world authors from the 18th century to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (W)

LIT 206 British Literature I

A survey of major authors and literary trends up to the 18th century.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 207 British Literature II

A survey of major authors and trends from the 19th century to the present. LIT 206 is not a prerequisite for LIT 207.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 208 American Literature I

A survey of major authors and literary trends from colonial and revolutionary periods to the westward expansion.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 209 American Literature II

A survey of major authors and literary trends from the Civil War to modern times.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 211 Myth and Epic: From Orality to Literacy

A study of great myths and epics from Mesopotamia, ancient Greece, classical Rome, medieval Europe and Africa. Open to all students.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (W)

LIT 214 Introduction to Literary Theory

In this introductory course students will study and practice various ways of reading and interpreting literary texts. The course will acquaint students with the methods and materials of literary scholarship and the specific vocabulary needed to identify and discuss a range of major 20th-century theories that helped shape English as a discipline.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 216 Mothers and Daughters in Literature and Film

An exploration of the myths and realities of the mother-daughter relation as presented in poetry, fiction, autobiography, film and visual art by women.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 229 Contemporary African Literature

A survey of contemporary African authors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (NW) (W)

LIT 233 Trauma Narratives: Africa

Students will learn to understand and explain the issues, terms and concepts involved in discussing African literature. They will be able to identify and define the basic concepts and narrative techniques of trauma literature. They will analyze selections of African fiction dealing with human-made and deliberately perpetrated traumas. They will also develop tentative conclusions about the nature and craft of African trauma narratives, how they differ from other trauma literatures and how they evolve African and postcolonial literatures. Students will lead peers in discussions on the core issues/texts of the course and write a clear, well-developed and organized essay that demonstrates rigorous critical thinking, mastery of writing skills and competence in integrating and documenting research.
Credit Hours: 4
(A), (IG), (NW)

LIT 238 Women's Literature

This course critically examines women's writing and may incorporate a variety of genres, including fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama. The texts come from a variety of traditions, from classic texts by women writers to the avant-garde, and from a variety of historical and literary periods.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (W)

LIT 240 Contemporary Themes: Memoir

A study of selected contemporary memoir. Content will vary depending on instructor.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 249 Transformation: Fiction to Screen

A study of the transformation of short stories and novels to the screen aimed at an enhanced appreciation of both the written page and the visual medium.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 257 The Contemporary Novel

A study of selected novels by major contemporary authors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 270-278 Topics in English

A study of traditional or experimental fiction, non-fiction or poetry at the introductory level. May be repeated if the content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

LIT 282-289 Modern Drama

Studies include survey of modern drama (Ibsen to the present), contemporary British drama, contemporary American drama or modern Continental drama. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

LIT 300 The Romantic Writers

A study of the Romantic Movement from Blake to Keats.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course, or permission of the instructor

LIT 301 The Victorian Writers

A study of Victorian literature from Carlyle to Kipling.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 303 Modern Poetry

An introduction to the major poets and schools of modern and contemporary poetry in England and the United States.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; ENG 200 level literature course, or permission of instructor.

LIT 307 Shakespeare's Romances and Tragedies

An advanced study of several of Shakespeare's finest romances and tragedies, involving a close analysis of the texts and incorporating a thorough grounding in the Renaissance mindset.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 308 Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories

An advanced study of several of Shakespeare's finest comedies and history plays.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AER 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 309-311 Advanced Drama

Studies include Elizabethan, Restoration or contemporary drama. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 312 Contemporary World Literature

A selection of today's major living authors from around the world.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 318-322 Fiction

A study of traditional or experimental novels or short fiction. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 323 Post-Colonial Literature and Theory - Asian Subcontinent

This course explores postcolonial identity in literature written by writers from the subcontinent. Particular attention will be given to cultural and historical issues that discuss the emergence of nationalism as a reaction to the British Raj, and the decolonization movements that contribute to the forming of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The primary texts will be literary, but we will ground our discussions in theoretical issues related to postcolonial studies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 324 Post-Colonial Literature and Theory

This course is designed to focus on a variety of colonial and post-colonial literatures in Africa, the Caribbean, Indonesia or Latin America. It is a study of the representation of personal, racial and national identity in works from the selected region, written during the period of struggle against colonialism and afterwards. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NW) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 325 The Eighteenth Century

Studies the major authors of the neoclassical period.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor. May be repeated if content varies.

LIT 334 The Medieval Vision

Investigation of medieval views of the world and humankind through close reading of several literary masterpieces.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 335 English Renaissance Literature

The poetry, prose and drama of England's most glorious literary period, the 16th and 17th centuries.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 337 Multiethnic U.S. Literature and Film

This course explores four major ethnic heritages - Native American, Hispanic, African American and Asian American - through contemporary literature and film. Discussion of the unique historical background casts light upon multicultural expression in literature and film. Other arts, such as dance, music and folklore, enrich our appreciation of each community's artistic identity.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 340-344 Major Poets

Close reading and analysis of one or more major poets. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201.

LIT 347 Irish Literature

A study of Irish fiction, drama, poetry, memoir and film of the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes the influences of colonialism, politics, sectarianism, religion and notions of family and women's roles on this body of literature. Includes a study of major writers from the early part of the 20th century, such as James Joyce, and their influence on contemporary writers.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWE 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 350-355 Topics in English

This is a special topics course at the 300 level. The course will incorporate an advanced study of a topic and/or genre. The course material may be from any historical period and may include any nationality, ethnicity, etc. Course may be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWE 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of the instructor.

LIT 360-365 Major Authors

A study of one or more of the most significant American, British or world writers. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 425 Seminar

A capstone course focused on a defined area of literary study, such as a major author, literary movement or genre. Content varies depending on instructor. Especially recommended for students going on to professional or graduate school.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; junior or senior status; and at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 430 Literary Criticism

A study of significant contemporary literary theories. Selected approaches to literary texts may include formalist, Freudian, reader response, poststructural, cultural and new historicist criticism.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; a ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 444 Wordimagebookscreen

Drawing on various disciplines, this course focuses on methods for "reading" culture and contemporary consciousness, concentrating on word and image in the formation of attitudes, ideologies and myths. Introduces cultural analysis and a metalanguage through which students can understand the competing sign systems and discourses of culture.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (A)

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 450-454 Topics in English

Deals with different subjects each time course is offered and may be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one ENG 200 level literature course or permission of instructor.

LIT 495-499 Directed Reading

A program of directed readings and related writing assignments agreed upon by individual students and professors. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and AWR 201; at least one survey ENG 200 level literature course of permission of instructor.

LJA 204 Introduction to Law and the Legal System

An examination of the role of laws in society, the fundamental sources of law, and the legal system and its procedures. Develops the skills for legal research, writing and analysis. Introduces the substantive areas of constitutional, contract and criminal law and torts.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

LJA 211 Legal Research and Writing

This course will introduce students to legal research and writing, general legal terminology and various legal concepts.  It will also introduce students to composing and editing legal writing.

Credit Hours: 4

LJA 315 Appellate Advocacy

The course focuses on persuasive writing and oral advocacy. Specifically, students will write an appellate brief and make oral arguments using the American Collegiate Moot Court Association case. Students will be chosen to participate in regional and national moot court competitions.

Credit Hours: 4

LJA 316 Trial Advocacy

The course will focus on trial advocacy, process and evidence. A case problem developed by the American Mock Trial Association will be used as the foundation of the course. Students will be chosen to participate in regional and national mock trial competitions.

Credit Hours: 4

LJA 400 Mock Trial Tournament

This is an advanced and intense trial advocacy experience.  Students must have the approval of the assigned professor to register.  To be selected for the course, students must earn a B or better in Trial Advocacy (LJA 316) during the fall semester, and earn high scores from mock judges during an in-class, end-of-fall-semester mock trial competition. Selected students will participate in a seven-week intensive preparation for an American Mock Trial Association regional tournament (held in either February or March of the Spring Term). This is a Pass/Fail class.

Credit Hours: 4

LJA 450 Independent Study

An applied, experiential moot court or mock trial experience, which involves case-problem readings and participation in either moot court or mock trial tournaments. The course must be under the direction of a full-time LJA professor, and the subject matter will depend on the yearly national case problems devised by The American Mock Trial Association and The American Collegiate Moot Court Association. The independent study credits are pure electives, not counting toward the law, justice and advocacy minor.

One credit only, repeatable up to a maximum of four credits.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

LJA 315 and LJA 316

LJAH 315 Appellate Advocacy (Honors)

Using a mock Supreme Court case, developed by the American Collegiate Moot Court Association, students explore constitutional issues, and using the case, develop critical thinking, persuasive writing, public speaking, and analytical skills.  In teams of two, students compete in a scrimmage, and depending on their scores may be selected to represent the university at a regional ACMCA tournament.  Individually, students write an appellate brief, crafting arguments for either the mock petitioner or respondent.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (H)

LJAH 411 Law and Social Policy (Honors)

Students will employ legal and social science methodologies in critically examining the use of social science by the courts to resolve important constitutional and procedural issues.

Credit Hours: 4
(H)

MAR 100 Open Water

Any student under medical care or on prescription medication must see the instructor before registering for this course. This is a PADI Open Water SCUBA course that teaches safe diving procedures and the use of diving equipment. The course involves lectures, pool sessions and two weekend days for the certification dives. Use of the equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. Transportation is not provided for the student for the weekend dives. Laboratory fee: $150.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Students must show swimming proficiency.

MAR 102 Advanced Open Water

Any student under medical care or on prescription medication must see the instructor before registering for this course. This is a PADI Advanced SCUBA course covering topics on navigation, deep diving (60-100 feet), boat diving and drift diving. The course involves lectures and three weekend days for the certification dives. Use of the equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. Transportation is not provided for the student for the weekend dives. Laboratory fee: $260.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 103 Rescue Diver

Student must be current in first aid and CPR by the first week of this course. Course topics cover SCUBA-related rescue techniques and emergency procedures. The course involves lectures, pool sessions, and a one-day weekend dive trip for the certification dives. Use of the equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is only offered during the second seven weeks of the fall semester. Laboratory fee: $175.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Advanced Open Water certification (MAR 102) or equivalent valid certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 104 PADI Divemaster

Course description: Students learn how to organize and plan safe and successful dives for dive groups, and supervise students in training. PADI Divemaster certification may be applied for through PADI Headquarters after successful completion of the course requirements. The course involves lectures, pool sessions, and a minimum of two weekends of diving. Some SCUBA equipment is provided for use. It is recommended that students have all of their own diving equipment except air tanks. Course offered only during the spring semester. Laboratory fee: $200.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

PADI Rescue Diver certification (MAR 103). Student must have proof of 20 dives.

MAR 126 Marine Biology

Designed for non-science majors. A survey of marine biology including a discussion of the basic marine environments, natural history of marine animals, special adaptations of marine mammals, elementary marine chemistry, marine plants and their economic importance, and the impact of pollution on marine ecosystems. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience, but is not applicable toward a marine science or biology majors or minors. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

MAR 150 Physical Geology (laboratory included)

A broad survey of the geological processes at work on and within the earth. Topics include the origin and composition of rocks, as well as the origin, location and characteristics of volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain belts, within the framework of plate tectonics. Also covers the modification of the earth's surface by wind, rivers, glaciers, groundwater, waves and currents, and the evolution of continents and ocean basins. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

MAR 150L Physical Geology Laboratory

A broad survey of the geological processes at work on and within the earth. Topics include the origin and composition of rocks, as well as the origin, location and characteristics of volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain belts, within the framework of plate tectonics. Also covers the modification of the earth’s surface by wind, rivers, glaciers, groundwater, waves and currents, and the evolution of continents and ocean basins. Lecture and laboratory.
Credit Hours: 0

MAR 1021 Specialty Diver, part 1

This PADI diving course covers three specialty dive certifications: Enriched Air Nitrox, Peak Buoyancy and Equipment Specialist. The course involves lectures and one weekend day for the certification dives. Use of the equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is offered only during the first seven weeks of the spring semester. Note: Specialty Diver, part 2, may be taken before Specialty Diver part 1. Laboratory fee: $200.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification.

MAR 1022 Specialty Diver, part 2

During this course, the student completes two specific PADI specialty diver certifications: Boat Diver and Drift Diver Specialist. The course involves lectures and a two-day weekend dive trip for the certification dives. Use of the equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is offered only during the second seven weeks of the spring semester. Note: Specialty Diver, part 2, may be taken before Specialty Diver, part 1. Laboratory fee: $260.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 200 Introduction to Marine Science

This course is intended as a broad introduction to marine science that will serve as a foundation for more advanced coursework in one or more of the disciplines introduced in this course. Topics covered in this course will include: 1) the physical geology of the earth with special emphasis on ocean basins; 2) the physical properties of water as they relate to tides, currents, waves and climate modulation; 3) the chemistry of seawater with regard to dissolved elements and gasses; and 4) a broad overview of life in the oceans. May only be used to satisfy major requirements in marine-science biology. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

MAR 222 Marine Ecology

Studies the interactions between marine organisms and their biotic and abiotic ocean environment, including an investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms in the sea, the causes of these patterns, and the roles of these species in marine ecosystems. The course and its companion laboratory address marine systems from an experimental perspective with an emphasis on experimental design, statistical data analysis, quantitative skills, and techniques in scientific writing. Two weekend field trips are required.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 222L Marine Ecology Laboratory

Studies the interactions between marine organisms and their biotic and abiotic ocean environment, including an investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms in the sea, the causes of these patterns, and the roles of these species in marine ecosystems. The course and its companion laboratory address marine systems from an experimental perspective with an emphasis on experimental design, statistical data analysis, quantitative skills, and techniques in scientific writing. Two weekend field trips are required.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 226 Marine Zoology

A study of the taxonomy, ecology and behavior of marine invertebrates. Examines local fauna and habitats through field-oriented studies. Requires some Saturday field trips.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 226L Marine Zoology Laboratory

A study of the taxonomy, ecology and behavior of marine invertebrates. Examines local fauna and habitats through field-oriented studies. Requires some Saturday field trips.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 301 Physical Oceanography

A study of the physical properties of seawater, global heat balance, hydrodynamics, ocean currents, waves, tides, and underwater sound and optics. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: PHY 201 or PHY 206

MAR 310 Biological Oceanography

Introduction to marine organisms, factors controlling their distribution and abundance, and the adaptations to and interactions with their environment. This course will emphasize the importance of trophic interactions in biogeochemical cycling, carbon flow, productivity and climate control. At least one weekend field excursion will be required.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, MAR 200

MAR 310L Biological Oceanogrphy Laboratory

Introduction to marine organisms, factors controlling their distribution and abundance, and the adaptations to and interactions with their environment. This course will emphasize the importance of trophic interactions in biogeochemical cycling, carbon flow, productivity and climate control. At least one weekend field excursion will be required.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, MAR 200

MAR 327 Marine Botany

Studies the ecology, physiology and communities of marine primary producers with emphases on Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Topics explored are phytoplankton, benthic macroalgae, mangroves, seagrass and saltmarsh communities.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 327L Marine Botany Laboratory

Studies the ecology, physiology and communities of marine primary producers with emphases on Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Topics explored are phytoplankton, benthic macroalgae, mangroves, seagrass and saltmarsh communities.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

MAR 344 Coral Reefs

This course examines coral reef ecosystems, including their biology, ecology, geologic setting, the chemical and physical characteristics, and the impact of global climate change on this ecosystem type. Immediately after the end of the spring semester, students will participate in a 14-day Study Abroad experience at the Roatan Institute of Marine Sciences on the island of Roatan in Honduras.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BIO 203, BIO 204, permission of instructor; MAR 100 or its equivalent is required

MAT 150 Introductory Algebra

A study of the basic concepts of algebra such as first-degree equations, factoring, rational expressions, graphing, quadratic equations, exponents and radicals. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.

Credit Hours: 4

MAT 155 Finite Mathematics for Liberal Arts

Appropriate as a general distribution requirement for liberal arts students. Topics include graph theory, planning and scheduling, data collection, descriptive statistics, social choices and voting, the problem of fair division, and the study of size and shape.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

MAT 160 College Algebra

Topics include functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and matrices.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

MAT 170 Precalculus

Covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometric functions, polar coordinates and vectors.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent.

MAT 180 College Geometry

This course covers the basic concepts of geometry to include properties of geometric shapes, transformations, similarity, problem solving and proof writing. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent

MAT 201 Introduction to Statistics

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, with applications in various disciplines using statistical computer software. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 155 or equivalent (or higher).

MAT 225 Calculus for Business

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental components of differential and integral calculus, with a particular emphasis on those aspects of calculus that have applications to business. The course covers exponential and logarithmic functions, limits, differentiation and differentiation techniques, applications of the derivative (e.g., marginal cost, marginal revenue, rate of growth), anti-derivatives, the integral as an area, functions of several variables, and partial derivatives.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent.

MAT 260 Calculus I

Covers limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of derivatives, integration, and integration by substitution.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 170 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent.

MAT 261 Calculus II

Covers integration techniques and applications, parametric and polar curves, sequences and infinite series.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 260 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 262 Calculus III

Covers vectors in two and three dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integration and vector calculus.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 285 Programming with Mathematical Applications

This course teaches programming fundamentals such as program design and modularity, with an emphasis on mathematical applications. Mathematical fields from which problems will be drawn include number theory, linear algebra, statistics, differential equations, multivariable calculus and modeling.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 with a grade of "C" or higher

MAT 299 Introduction to Higher Mathematics

Covers proof techniques, basic set theory, relations and partitions, functions and cardinality.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 262 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 300 Differential Equations

Covers first-order differential equations with applications, higher-order differential equations with applications, systems of differential equations and numerical solutions of differential equations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 262 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 301 Discrete Mathematics

Covers sets, induction, algorithms, recursion, matrices, relations, functions, digraphs, partially ordered sets, lattices, Boolean algebra, switching circuits, trees and combinatorial analysis.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 308 Linear Algebra

Covers systems of equations, matrices, vectors spaces and subspaces, dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 310 Probability and Mathematical Statistics

Covers probability, descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 401 Real Analysis

Covers the theory of limits, continuity, differentiation and integration.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 410 Complex Analysis

Covers complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 420 Modern Abstract Algebra

Covers the theory of groups, rings and fields.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 490 Senior Seminar

An in-depth study of a topic in mathematics or mathematical programming. Requires consultation with a faculty member, personal research, library research and an oral presentation.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing in mathematics or mathematical programming. Permission of the department chair required.

MAT 499 Selected Topics

Subject may be chosen from point-set topology, partial differential equations, combinatorics, graph theory or other topics.

Credit Hours: 1-4

MFA in Creative Writing Term One (Residency and Tutorial Period)

A 10-day residency initiates term one, with program faculty delivering formal talks on elements of craft, as well as seminars on aesthetic issues and works from the literary canon. Students participate in faculty-guided genre and mentee workshops, and discussion sessions. They also attend readings and lectures by guest faculty and visiting writers and talks by editors and publishers. Assigned readings focus on principles of craft and techniques appropriate to the genre, providing the opportunity for deeper analysis from a writer’s point of view and a broader understanding of literary traditions.

The residency is followed by a five-month tutorial period with four submissions, at prescribed intervals, of original creative writing and annotations on readings. These submissions are critiqued by the faculty mentor. The nature and direction of the reading and writing projects during the tutorial period are planned and agreed upon during the residency through individual conferences with the faculty mentor, and are tailored to the specific needs of the student.


Credit Hours: 12 credits

MFA in Creative Writing Term Two (Residency and Tutorial Period)

Term two extends the student’s accomplishments in term one and begins with a 10-day residency. In plenary sessions and smaller group settings, program faculty offer presentations on elements of craft, as well as seminars on aesthetic issues and works from the literary canon, often involving pertinent concerns across genres. Students participate in faculty-guided genre workshops, small group sessions with mentors, individual conferences and more general discussion sessions. They also attend readings and lectures by guest faculty and visiting writers and talks by editors and publishers. As in term one, assigned readings focus on principles of craft and techniques appropriate to the genre and the development of the writing life, providing the opportunity for deeper analysis of works from a writer’s point of view and a broader understanding of literary traditions. Each term two student also assumes a more central role in seminars by serving as respondent in at least one session.

The term two residency is followed by a five-month tutorial period with four submissions, at prescribed intervals, of original creative writing and annotations on readings. These submissions are critiqued by the faculty mentor. The nature and direction of the reading and writing projects during the tutorial period are determined by a plan of study worked out by the student and faculty mentor during the residency. Each plan is tailored to build upon work thus far accomplished, as well as to address the specific needs and interests of the student.


Credit Hours: 12 credits

MFA in Creative Writing Term Three (Residency and Tutorial Period)

Term three begins with a 10-day residency, with activities similar to those outlined above. But in addition to the residency program, and a leadership role as an advanced respondent in a workshop or presentation, students attend a seminar on writing critical essays in preparation for the subsequent tutorial period focused on the writing of an extended critical essay (25 pages). With his or her faculty mentor, each student agrees upon an appropriate topic for the critical paper, as well as supporting readings and a schedule of draft submissions that will occur during the tutorial period. The completed critical paper is due at the end of the tutorial period. The student also submits drafts of original work and annotations in accordance with the negotiated plan of study.



Credit Hours: 12 credits

MFA in Creative Writing Term Four (Residency and Tutorial Period, followed by the culminating fifth residency)

Term four is the culmination of the program and starts with a 10-day residency, with activities similar to those outlined above. Each student takes on additional responsibilities as senior respondent in a residency session, but special emphasis is placed on preparation for teaching a graduating student seminar during the culminating residency and on completing the graduate thesis manuscript. Part of the tutorial period plan of study includes approval and signing of a thesis plan with a thesis director and a second faculty reader, as well as approval of the student’s culminating residency seminar topic. Term four students attend a pedagogy workshop to aid them in the preparation of the seminar each will conduct during the culminating residency.

Term four students attend a fifth, capstone residency at which they present a graduate seminar, present their thesis (a minimum of 125 pages of fiction or nonfiction, 55 pages of poetry) and their annotated bibliography, give a public reading of original work and complete all required program documentation.

Credit Hours: 12 credit

MGT 330 Principles of Management

This course studies the evolution and practice of the core management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A strong emphasis on leadership skills is integrated into the course content to provide the student with a framework with which to translate classroom theory and practice into individual and team performance in the accomplishment of organizational objectives.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101, AWR 201 and COB requirements for taking 300-level courses.

MGT 340 Human Resource Management

This course analyzes the acquisition, development and retention of human resources to accomplish the organization's strategic objectives appropriately, efficiently and economically. This course provides an overview of the functional areas within HRM and further examines the ethical and legal environment relevant to HRM, contemporary health and safety responsibilities and trends, and labor unions. Additionally, the course surveys social, legal, and ethical international HRM issues.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 330.

MGT 345 Global Organizational Behavior

This course examines the influence of individual differences and ethnic cultures and national cultures on behaviors in organizations. It addresses the questions of when and how to be sensitive to these issues, and develops skills required to manage effectively in the diverse environment of the 21st century. Within this context, the course focuses on six essential skill-building areas: managing diversity, team building, communicating, motivating, conflict management and negotiations, and creativity and critical thinking.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

MGT 330.

MGT 350 International Business

This course covers a broad range of international business topics that impact the strategic operations of global enterprises. It offers a managerial perspective of the practices and principles involved in conducting business across national boundaries. The course content explores the interaction between the macro global dimensions (economic, political, and socio-cultural) and the functional operations of business (i.e., international finance, management and marketing).

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

MGT 330.

MGT 355 The Art and Science of Negotiation

This course focuses on the development of problem-solving and communication competencies relevant to a broad spectrum of negotiation settings from personal relationships to the global business environment. Students learn useful analytical frameworks to understand the effect of content and communication skills on the negotiation process and outcomes. Through the use of extensive role-playing, students have the opportunity to practice an array of negotiation techniques and to develop their communication and problem-solving skills.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 330.

MGT 360 Sustainable Development: A New Business Paradigm

In a world of exploding population growth, diminishing natural resources, changing climate and instantaneous worldwide communications, businesses are being held to increasingly higher performance standards by increasingly larger numbers of stakeholders. Today's business leaders are responsible for the firms' financial, social, and environmental performance - the "triple-bottom line." Using management tools in sustainability and sustainable development, students will be able to analyze business environments and develop corporate strategies that are responsive to the multiple stakeholders of the firm. Students will analyze sustainable business practices and identify best practices in the field.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and junior standing.

MGT 365 Business Strategies for Emerging and the Base of the Pyramid Markets

Emerging and bottom of the pyramid (BOP) markets represent almost 90 percent of the world's population and offer great opportunities for businesses, and even greater challenges. This course describes the nature of emerging and BOP markets. Students will examine case studies that describe the innovation required of companies as they enter these marketplaces as well as the institutional voids inherent in these markets, voids that must be recognized and overcome in order for companies to be successful. Strategies for emerging and BOP markets will also be discussed and analyzed by students during the course of the semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and junior standing.

MGT 431 Practical Strategic Assessment

Not open to graduate students. This course focuses on the application of strategic management skills and the knowledge gained from prior coursework. Students analyze an organization's situation, recognize strategic issues and make recommendations. The course utilizes a group project to challenge students' skills in critical thinking, speaking, writing, teamwork, and the ability to apply theory to real-world situations. This integrative capstone experience is required for all undergraduate business majors.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Senior standing, FIN 310, MGT 330 and MKT 300.

MGT 490 Management Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MGT 330, junior or senior standing and either a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a GPA of 3.0 in COB courses.

MGT 495 Special Topics in Management

A course offered at the discretion of the management department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MGT 499 Independent Study in Management

A readings or independent studies course taken for variable credit. May not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and COB associate dean.

MGT 500 Foundations of Management

This course covers theories and practices for successfully managing organizations and people. You will be introduced to a variety of concepts, assessments, tools and techniques that are important for understanding the changing business environment; elements of decision-making and strategic planning; methods of organizing including recruiting, selecting, training and developing; and procedures for controlling resources to improve productivity and results.
Credit Hours: 2

MGT 598 Leadership and Organizational Behavior

For graduate students only. This course allows students to assess and develop their leadership skills as well as apply leadership concepts in personal and organizational environments. Students explore models related to behavioral aspects of leadership, including trust, power, diversity and ethics. Through experiential learning, readings and analyses, students develop an understanding of leadership concepts and how to utilize this body of knowledge to inspire others to achieve organizational goals. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to leadership success through work-life integration. This class begins with an intensive weekend workshop involving a comprehensive business simulation.

Credit Hours: 4

MGT 615 Strategic Management

For graduate students only. This is the capstone course for the MBA. It focuses on business-unit and corporate-level strategy formulation and implementation. Through readings, case analyses and participation in the Strategic Analysis Program (SAP) field study project involving a local organization, students will apply the ideas, tools, concepts and knowledge gained from previous coursework to real-world problems.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 610, ECO 640, FIN 611, ITM 608, MGT598 and MKT 609.

MGT 624 Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

For graduate students only. This course analyzes the principles applicable to managerial decisions, with a focus on the business ethics and social responsibility dimensions of these decisions. It is designed to provide an understanding of the rapidly evolving concepts, practices, and leadership techniques that facilitate the development of legal compliance, ethics and social responsibility initiatives. Particular focus will be made on the use of the "triple bottom line." This course draws on case analysis and is offered through an interactive and dynamic format involving leading ethics and compliance officers in the community.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

MGT 625 International Management

For graduate students only. This course examines the challenges associated with managing a multinational enterprise that competes in today's dynamic global business environment. Through extensive readings, class projects and case analyses, students obtain a fundamental understanding of the cultural, economic, political and legal factors in the global environment that affect doing business internationally, as well as the strategic, operational and ethical choices global managers make in response to those factors.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

MGT 626 HR Strategy: Effective Utilization of People

For graduate students only. This course involves strategically analyzing human resource management by integrating the external environment and competition with the internal corporate strategies and HRM tasks of the firm. The course focuses on recruitment, selection, planning and information systems, equal employment opportunity, compensation and benefits, organization and job design, labor relations, training and development, performance appraisal, international HRM issues, and contemporary health and safety issues. Students will critically evaluate these HRM support subsystems from a cost-benefit and legal perspective and learn to align HRM solutions with business strategy and the realities of labor markets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 598.

MGT 635 Leadership by Design

For graduate students only. This interactive seminar course investigates the role of leaders, using organizational design concepts to build systems and processes that align people in the organization with its vision, mission and goals. Students develop a realistic, applied understanding of how leaders use organizational design to lead their organizations, construct decision models, and develop processes to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Students gain insights into how to use design tools to analyze and solve complex business problems. Emphasis is on leadership through design, implementation and evaluation.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 598.

MGT 650 Nonprofit Management and Innovation: Thinking Strategically

This course develops context for social enterprise and nonprofit strategic planning. It includes a historic overview of the innovative development of nonprofit organizations, a study of the environmental elements in society that affect nonprofit organizations, orientation and success, discussion of the role of boards in planning, the means for developing effective partnerships and a template for strategic planning. The course will include an application-oriented capstone exercise.

Credit Hours: 3

MGT 659 Nonprofit Management and Innovation: Leadership and Innovation

This course is the final in the four-week course sequence for the Nonprofit Management and Innovation certificate program. The week has two major segments: leadership and innovation. The leadership portion will help students to identify and assess their leadership potential and evaluate team roles and contributions. The second theme of the week, innovation, is designed to help students formulate an understanding of innovation and social entrepreneurship. The capstone project will tie together the two themes by requiring each group to conduct a feasibility study that identifies an innovative idea and develops an implementation plan that conceptualizes the role of strategic leadership.

Credit Hours: 3

MGT 660 Optimizing Organizational Learning

For graduate students only. This course explores how organizations acquire, create, share and leverage what they know to create sustainable competitive advantage in their markets. Their stock of knowledge represents intellectual capital that must be effectively managed. Knowledge of management processes and systems are discussed based on case studies and research of best practices in leading companies. The course also covers the international and domestic laws governing intellectual property.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 598.

MGT 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval of the graduate office, the college internship coordinator, and the associate dean.

MGT 692 Learning by Travel: Managing in International Markets

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop personal familiarity with the global environment and some of the issues faced by global managers. Beyond the social and cultural dimensions that the residency explores, the course will focus on developing an increased understanding of global markets, competition and business opportunities.
Credit Hours: 4

MGT 695 Special Topics in Management

A course offered at the discretion of the management department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MGT 699 Independent Study in Management

For graduate students only.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing

Studies the interacting business activities designed to plan, price, promote and distribute want-satisfying products and services to present and potential customers. Incorporates current developments in marketing to acquaint students with the present-day challenges of marketing activities.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FYW 101 and ECO 204.

MKT 352 Services Marketing and Management

This course is designed to address the distinct needs and problems of service organizations in the area of marketing. Services management is also addressed, exposing students to the unique operations, human resources, and promotional elements implicit in running a service firm. New service development is the final step, as the class culminates in the conceptualization of a brand new service offering along with a completed service marketing plan.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 354 Buyer Behavior

A study of the behavioral science concepts applicable to the consumer decision-making process, such as personality, perception, and group and cultural influences. Emphasis is on how these concepts and characteristics can be used by marketers to develop more effective relationships and strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 360 Marketing Research

A methodological approach to marketing and consumer research problems and opportunities, using both primary and secondary research. Examines the information needs of marketing managers and the use of information for making effective marketing decisions. Covers the marketing research process, including research design, analysis and interpretation, and reporting of findings.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 210 (or equivalent statistics course) and MKT 300.

MKT 371 Personal Selling and Sales Management

Examines the personal selling process and the use of a professional, customer-oriented, problem-solving approach in selling situations. Studies the nature of the sales job, selection of salespeople, sales training programs, and issues in the compensation, supervision, motivation, and ethical challenges of salespeople.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 372 Retail and Distribution Management

Explores the dynamics of retailing and the range of firms that make up the retailing industry. Examines the functions, practices and organizations of various store types. Focuses, through current articles, on those retailers who hold leadership positions in key retailing disciplines such as customer service, operations management and TQM, market orientation, technology, research and development, human resources, e-commerce, and promotions. Examines the future of retailing, international retailing, future trends and their impact on retailers, and the impact of e-commerce.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 410 Global Marketing

Not open to graduate students. Prepares students for the global marketing environment by examining marketing in other countries, the marketing implications of cultural and environmental differences, international marketing research, and adaptation of product, price, promotion and distribution decisions to the foreign environment.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 411 Promotion and Branding Strategies

Focuses on integrated marketing communications and branding strategies, with coverage of advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, branding and social media. Studies the development of integrated communications plans for organizations. Also for students minoring in advertising.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 450 Marketing Strategy

Develops students' ability to use facts in the analysis of marketing strategy. A capstone course that serves as a vehicle for the application and integration of the concepts, analytical tools and problem-solving approaches taught in lower-level marketing courses.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Completion of eight hours of marketing courses.

MKT 490 Marketing Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MKT 300, junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB.

MKT 495 Special Topics in Marketing

A course offered at the discretion of the marketing department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MKT 499 Independent Study in Marketing

A readings and independent studies course taken for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and associate dean.

MKT 500 Introduction to Marketing

For graduate students only. Studies the interacting business activities designed to plan, price, promote, and distribute want-satisfying products and services to present and potential customers. Incorporates current development in marketing to acquaint students with the present-day challenges of marketing activities.

Credit Hours: 2

MKT 609 Marketing Management and Customer Value

For graduate students only. Examines the development and evaluation of marketing, planning and strategy from a managerial perspective. Integrates the delivery of high levels of customer value (delighting customers), which enhances the "connection" between the firm and the customer, ultimately leading to more loyal, profitable customers. Measurement of marketing metrics, decision theory, pricing and promotion are also topics. Covers applicable research techniques, as well as contributions from other disciplines in the context of marketing management.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500, ECO 500.

MKT 610 Strategic Marketing Analysis

For graduate students only. Focuses on the rapidly evolving concepts and analytical techniques that facilitate strategic plan development using interactive simulations and real-world case studies. Topics include analytical prerequisites for planning, formal strategic planning methods, and business and marketing strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 612 Business Research Methods

For graduate students only. This course demonstrates a logical approach to marketing and business research by focusing on the process of research and examining information needs of marketing managers. Primary and secondary research tools, survey design and analysis techniques, and methods of interpreting and reporting results are examined.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 613 Global Marketing

For graduate students only. This course prepares students for the global marketing environment by examining marketing in other countries; the marketing implications of cultural and environmental differences; international marketing research; and adaptation of product, price, promotion, and distribution decisions to the foreign environment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 614 Personal Selling and Sales Management

For graduate students only. Through lectures, student presentations, journal articles, and lab sessions, this course examines the personal selling process and the use of a professional, customer-oriented problem-solving approach in selling situations. Reviews the nature of a sales job and issues in the supervision and motivation of salespeople, and ethical challenges they face.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 615 Integrated Marketing Communications

For graduate students only. This course focuses on the strategic concept of integrated marketing communications (IMC). IMC incorporates advertising, sales promotions, publicity, public relations, personal selling, social media and any other means by which marketing information is communicated to people. The course involves a synthesis of the theoretical, practical, and social considerations of IMC.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 616 Marketing on the Cutting Edge

For graduate students only. This course consists of a variety of specialty, cutting-edge marketing topics that students would not usually be exposed to when taking a traditional sequence of marketing classes. The course is team taught as a series of independent lectures by experts in the specialty field.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 650 Nonprofit Management and Innovation: Marketing, Development and Communications

The Nonprofit Management and Innovation certificate program was developed against a backdrop of increasing national concern over nonprofit executive succession. It fills a unique niche among area college and university programs and responds to interests expressed by Tampa Bay nonprofit and foundation leaders. This course covers marketing, development and communications.

Credit Hours: 3

MKT 652 Services Marketing and Management

For graduate students only. This course focuses on developing and managing the service encounter across different industries, including the nonprofit sector, in order to deliver service quality to the customer. In this course students learn the unique challenges of services and the different roles both employees and customers have in the creation and delivery of services. Students will be able to develop measures of service quality, research and anticipate customer expectations, design new services, and create service recovery strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 654 Strategic Brand Management

For graduate students only. Studies the important role of creating, building and managing an organization's branding strategy. The course integrates the theoretical foundation of brand strategy with contemporary readings on branding practice. Coursework involves discussion, case analysis and projects with a high level of student interaction.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 655 Marketing Law

For graduate students only. Explores the legal environment of marketing including a history of marketing law, legal implications in each strategic marketing area, and current legal cases in marketing.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 656 Electronic Marketing Strategy

For graduate students only. This course explores, from the strategic perspective, the unique marketing challenges and opportunities that electronic marketing presents. It requires a fundamental grounding in the principles of marketing. It explores the nexus between e-marketing and traditional marketing activities. The class also incorporates current developments in electronic marketing to acquaint students with the present day challenges and opportunities of e-marketing.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 657 Buyer Behavior

For graduate students only. The course introduces a wide range of behavioral concepts, and explores the strategic implications of customer behavior for marketers. The course challenges students to explore the realities and implications of buyer behavior in traditional and e-commerce markets. Key to the course is demonstrating how an understanding of buyer behavior can help to improve strategic decision making.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Foundation courses.

Corequisites

MKT 609.

MKT 658 Sport Marketing

Sport Marketing addresses various marketing issues that are important to sport marketers. Primarily explored are 1) the marketing of sports events, teams, equipment, and sports service providers and 2) the use of sports to market goods and services. Sport marketers must understand business principles and understand how value is created through marketing programs tied to athletes, team, leagues, fans and organizations. Topics covered include licensing, sponsorship, distribution, services marketing, products bundling, consumer behavior and communication. The class consists of lectures, guest speakers, class discussions and individual assignments relevant with current industry practices and trends.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and graduate standing.

MKT 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Approval by the graduate office, the college internship coordinator and the COB associate dean.

MKT 692 Learning by Travel: Marketing in International Markets

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop personal familiarity with the global environment and some of the issues faced by global managers. Beyond the social and cultural dimensions that the residency explores, the course will focus on developing an increased understanding of global markets, competition and business opportunities.
Credit Hours: 4

MKT 695 Special Topics in Marketing

For graduate students only. This course is offered at the discretion of the marketing department. Subject will focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MKT 699 Independent Study in Marketing

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in marketing.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

minimum 3.5 GPA, MKT 609 and written permission of the department chair.

MKT 700 Marketing Consulting Seminar

For graduate students only. This course focuses on a hands-on, comprehensive, team-based consulting project for a live client. The course is designed to be comprehensive in using marketing concepts and critical-thinking skills. The consulting project should focus on innovative and overarching solutions for the client.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 609. Co-Requisite: MKT 610 or permission from program director.

MKT 704 Marketing New Technology and Innovations

For graduate students only. This course focuses on the rapidly evolving concepts and analytical techniques for strategically marketing innovations and high-tech offerings. The impact of technology modifies traditional marketing strategies, and these differences are explored. The course involves developing a comprehensive strategic marketing plan for a new technology client so that students can apply updated strategic planning methods to business and marketing strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 609. Co-Requisite: MKT 610 or permission from program director.

MSL 101 Leadership and Personal Development

Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness and stress management relate to leadership, officership and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining an overall understanding of the ROTC program and its advantages for the student. All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 101 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 2

MSL 102 Introduction to Tactical Leadership

Discusses leadership fundamentals such as problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership, values, attributes, skills and actions in the context of practical, hands-on and interactive exercises. All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 102 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 2

MSL 110 Basic Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL I cadets (freshmen) enrolled in MSL 101. Involves practical exercises in the principles of military courtesy, discipline, self-confidence, drill and ceremonies, as well as introduction to basic soldier skills and tactics.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 111 Basic Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL I cadets (freshmen) enrolled in MSL 102. Involves practical exercises in the development of leadership fundamentals and soldier skills including basic land navigation, troop-leading procedures and squad tactical operations.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 201 Innovative Team Leadership

Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and teambuilding in the context of planning, executing and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank, structure and duties, and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier's Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the Contemporary Operating Environment (COE). All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 201 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 2

MSL 202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership

Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex Contemporary Operating Environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Continued study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MSL 202 provides a smooth transition into MSL 301. Cadets develop greater self-awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team-building skills. All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 202 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 2

MSL 203 American Military History

A study of the development of American military institutions, policies, experience and traditions in peace and war from colonial times to the present. All cadets must complete MSL 203 to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 203 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 4

MSL 210 Basic Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL II cadets (sophomores) enrolled in MSL 201. Involves practical exercises in the mission, organization and composition of military units, and continued development of soldier skills including basic land navigation, troop-leading procedures and squad tactical operations.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 211 Basic Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL II cadets (sophomores) enrolled in MSL 202. Involves practical exercises at the military team/squad level, emphasizing the functions, duties and responsibilities of junior leaders. Students are evaluated for acceptance into the Army ROTC advanced course (MSL 300-and 400-level courses).

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 301 Adaptive Team Leadership

Challenges cadets to study, practice and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their tactical leadership. Based on such feedback, as well as self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The focus is on developing cadets' tactical leadership abilities to enable them to succeed at Army ROTC summer Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets also participate in a physical training program. They must either meet the prerequisites (MSL 100/200-level courses), attend a summer leader's training course, or substitute past military experience with the approval of the professor of military science. All cadets must take the Advanced Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements.

Credit Hours: 3

MSL 302 Applied Team Leadership

Challenges cadets by utilizing increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units at the squad and platoon level. Skills in decision-making, persuading and motivating team members when "under fire" are explored, evaluated and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed as a means of preparing for the Army ROTC Leadership Development and Assessment Course. Cadets are expected to apply the Army leadership development model while leading teams; to apply tactical principles and doctrine to Army operations; and to conduct a self-assessment in personal development areas such as character, adaptability, and fitness in a garrison and field environment. Cadets also participate in a physical training program. They must either meet the prerequisites (MSL 100/200-level courses and MSL 301), attend a summer leader's training course, or substitute past military experience with the approval of the professor of military science. All cadets must take the Advanced Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements.

Credit Hours: 3

MSL 303 Leader Development and Assessment

A four-week, continuous Army ROTC leadership course conducted at Fort Lewis, WA. The course environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small-unit levels under challenging conditions. Topics include weapons applications, land navigation, small-unit tactics and various other military skills, as well as team-building and management techniques. The focus is on developing and assessing leadership, and individuals are continuously and formally assessed on their potential leadership ability. Attendance requires the permission of the professor of military science. Cadets receive pay, and the U.S. Army defrays travel, lodging and meal costs. Failure to attain course requirements at any time will result in immediate dismissal, return to campus, and potential disenrollment from Army ROTC. Each graduate receives a written Cadet Evaluation Report.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Permission of professor of military science.

MSL 310 Advanced Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL III cadets (juniors) enrolled in MSL 301. Involves practical exercises emphasizing the leader's role in directing and coordinating the efforts of individuals and small units in the execution of squad battle drills and offensive tactical missions.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 311 Advanced Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL III cadets (juniors) enrolled in MSL 302. Involves practical exercises that emphasize the duties and responsibilities of junior leaders in a garrison or field environment. Focuses on advanced individual skills and collective training in preparation for the four-week ROTC Leader Development and Assessment course. Particular emphasis is placed on the understanding of troop-leading procedures and the ability to develop and communicate a plan.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 401 Adaptive Leadership

Develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow Army ROTC cadets. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare MSL 401 cadets for commissioned service as an officer. They identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train and develop subordinates. Cadets also participate in a physical training program. Cadets must either meet the prerequisites (MSL 100/200/300-level courses) or substitute past military experience with the approval of the professor of military science. All cadets must take the Advanced Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements.

Credit Hours: 3

MSL 402 Leadership in a Complex World

Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the Contemporary Operating Environment (COE). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with nongovernmental organizations, civilians on the battlefield and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios and "What Now, Lieutenant?" exercises to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army. Cadets also participate in a physical training program. They must either meet the prerequisites (MSL 100-, 200- and 300-level courses) or substitute past military experience with the approval of the professor of military science. All cadets must take the Advanced Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements.

Credit Hours: 3

MSL 410 Advanced Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL IV cadets (seniors). Involves practical exercises in staff planning and coordination at the battalion level with emphasis on leadership and management of the Spartan Battalion.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 411 Advanced Leadership Laboratory

Required of MSL IV cadets (seniors). A continuation of MSL 410 that involves practical exercises to prepare cadets for service as commissioned officers.

Credit Hours: 0

MSL 450 Independent Study in MSL

An independent study in military science and leadership (Army ROTC) that provides cadets with an opportunity to pursue a topic, project or tailored curriculum under the guidance of an MSL faculty member. Variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Permission of professor of military science.

MUS 100 Music Fundamentals

Covers basic music reading, theory and terminology, including beginning keyboard, vocal and aural skills.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

MUS 102 Music for Life

A survey of Western musical thought and the history and evolution of musical forms and styles. Requires attendance at selected recitals on campus.

Credit Hours: 3
(W) (A)

MUS 103 Music Literature

Surveys the historical style-periods of music, emphasizing musical style characteristics and the development of critical listening skills. Highlights exemplary works of master composers.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music majors and minors only.

MUS 105 Basic Guitar Class

Elementary lessons in guitar, including music reading and basic instrument techniques.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

MUS 108 Recording and Electronic Music I

Techniques for creating sound and music for electronic media. Emphasis is on software-based recording, synthesis and sequencing. Course includes studio projects for developing aural perception and creativity, understanding principles of acoustics and acquiring basic audio production skills. Background on electronic music history, aesthetics and literature is provided.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

MUS 109 Recording and Electronic Music II

A continuing exploration of contemporary electronic music, multi-track recording techniques and the convergence of electronic music with other media in the digital era. Focus is on creative work and studio recording. Survey of contemporary electronic music aesthetics and literature is provided.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 108 or consent of instructor.

MUS 110 Piano Class I

Elementary group lessons in piano for the beginner, given in the electronic piano lab.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 100 or equivalent knowledge of music fundamentals.

MUS 111 Piano Class II

Post-elementary group lessons in piano. Scales, cadences and sight-reading skills are emphasized. Individualized piano study programs are designed for maximum growth using the electronic piano lab.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 110 or equivalent.

MUS 112 Aural Skills I

An introduction to sight singing and ear training techniques that is focused on developing the student’s ability to perform and transcribe simple rhythms, scales, intervals, chords, melodies and scale degree patterns.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 100 or a satisfactory score on the music department's Music Theory and Aural Skills Placement Exam.

MUS 113 Aural Skills II

A continuation of MUS 112 through sight singing and ear training techniques that is focused on further developing the student’s ability to perform and transcribe more complex rhythms, scales, intervals, chords, melodies and scale degree patterns.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 112 or an equivalent course, or a score of 3 or better on the aural subscore of the AP Music Theory Exam.

MUS 114 Voice Class I

Foundations of solo vocal technique and interpretation, song-learning and stage deportment. Taught in a group environment, lectures and discussions are combined with solo and group singing. Requires attendance at select recitals on campus.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

MUS 115 Voice Class II

Continuation of the solo vocal techniques and skills introduced in Voice Class I. Taught in a group environment, lecture/discussion sessions are combined with a strong emphasis on solo singing. Requires attendance at select recitals on campus. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 114 or permission of instructor.

MUS 116 Basic Guitar Class II

Continuation of Basic Guitar Class I. Taught in a group environment, lecture/discussion sessions are combined with a strong emphasis on solo and chamber playing. This course may be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 105.

MUS 117 Musicianship for Performing Arts I

Sight-singing and piano skills tailored to the needs of performing arts majors.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Corequisites

MUS 127.

MUS 118 Musicianship for Performing Arts II

Sight-singing and piano skills tailored to the needs of performing arts majors.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 117.

Corequisites

MUS 128.

MUS 122 Music Theory I

An introduction to the study of Western music theory, including elements of pitch, rhythm, harmony, diatonic chord function and nonchord tones

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 100 or a satisfactory score on the music department's Music Theory and Aural Skills Placement Exam.

MUS 123 Music Theory II

A continuation of MUS 122 designed to provide an in-depth study of diatonic chord function, harmonic progression, nonchord tones, principals of counterpoint and voice leading, part writing, phrase structure and form.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 122 or an equivalent course, or a score of 3 or better on the nonaural subscore of the AP Music Theory Exam.

MUS 124 Vocal Diction and Literature

A fundamental course designed to acquaint the student singer with IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), the correct pronunciation of Italian, French and German consonants and vowels, the diction rules of these languages, and the necessary practical application and performance and research of standard vocal literature.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Music majors, music minors and musical theatre majors only.

MUS 127 Music Theory for Performing Arts I

Theoretical music fundamentals tailored to the needs of performing arts majors.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Corequisites

MUS 117.

MUS 128 Music Theory for Performing Arts II

Theoretical music fundamentals tailored to the needs of performing arts majors.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 127.

Corequisites

MUS 118.

MUS 135 Alexander Technique for Musicians

An introduction to the Alexander Technique designed to help singers and instrumentalists discover and gradually eliminate harmful patterns in the use of their bodies, and to develop better use that facilitates coordination, efficiency, increased energy and injury prevention.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music majors only or permission of instructor.

MUS 147-175 Studio Lessons

Audition or instructor permission required. Intended for intermediate-level study only (beginning instruction is available in group settings for classical guitar, piano and voice). 100-level Studio Lessons (1-credit, 25-minute weekly lessons) are for students besides music majors and minors who are participating in UT music ensembles, and for music majors and minors taking studio lessons in secondary performance areas. 100-level lessons do not satisfy the Studio Lessons requirements in the primary performance area for music majors and may apply for up to only 2 credit hours of applied music study towards the music minor. Studio Lessons courses may be repeated for credit.

 

147 Organ (1)

149 Harpsichord (1)

150 Piano (1)

151 Voice (1)

152 Flute (1)

153 Oboe (1)

154 Clarinet (1)

155 Bassoon (1)

156 Saxophone (1)

157 Trumpet (1)

158 French Horn (1)

159 Trombone (1)

160 Baritone (1)

161 Tuba (1)

162 Percussion (1)

163 Violin (1)

164 Viola (1)

165 Cello (1)

166 String Bass (1)

167 Classical Guitar (1)

171 Harp (1)

172 Contemporary Guitar (1)

173 Contemporary Keyboard (1)

174 Contemporary Bass (1)

175 Contemporary Percussion (1)

 

 

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors in secondary applied area, or permission of Department Chair.

Corequisites

Enrollment in a Music Department ensemble related to the performance area of the Studio Lessons.

MUS 191 World Music

An examination of the cultures of various countries and societies through their music and their musical practices. May be used to fulfill international/global or non-Western Baccalaureate Experience requirements.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NW) (A)

MUS 192 World Music Drumming Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course in which students learn percussion/vocal music from other cultures and non-Western musical traditions. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. If taken for three or more semesters, the combined credit (a minimum of 3 credits) may satisfy one humanities/fine arts course in the core curriculum. Open to all University students without audition.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 195 Introduction to Jazz

An in-depth perspective of jazz through an analysis of its history, styles and prominent artists; the influence of jazz on popular music genres; and the confluence of jazz and American culture. Students will develop their critical thinking skills and knowledge of jazz by learning how to write through the mode of an aesthetic critique, in a scholarly and professional manner.

Credit Hours: 3
(W) (A)

MUS 200 Jazz Improvisation I

Jazz improvisation I is designed for the beginning improviser to learn basic theory and style related to jazz, and to apply that through personal creativity to transcribe, develop and perform improvised solos.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music major, music minor or permission of instructor; students must be able to read standard music notation, and must display a basic level of technical proficiency on their instrument or voice.

MUS 201 Jazz Improvisation II

Jazz Improvisation II is designed for the experienced improviser to learn more advanced jazz theory, and to apply it to improvising over more complex chord progressions.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 200 with a grade of C or better

MUS 205 Intro to Music Education, Human Development and Diversity

An introduction to music teaching and learning (K-12) with emphasis on the stages of human development and diversity.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Music education majors only.

MUS 208 Topics in Music

Topic varies as announced in the class schedule. May be repeated if content is different.

Credit Hours: 1-3

MUS 209 Field Experience Seminar

This course is taken by music education majors each semester for coordination and documentation of field experiences of all levels/types connected with music techniques, conducting, methods and final internship courses.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Music Education majors only.

MUS 210 Concert Recording Practicum

Through a hands-on approach, students learn the art and science of high-fidelity recording for live, acoustic music. Content includes principles of microphone selection/placement, sound diffusion and effective procedures for editing, mastering and music archival. Course requires the student to record a minimum number of events (event schedule announced on the first day of class).
Credit Hours: 2

MUS 211 Piano Class III

Early intermediate piano skills and repertoire designed to train the student for the Piano Proficiency Examination required for the Bachelor of Music in music education, and the Bachelor of Music in music performance degrees. Memorizing a solo, scales, cadences, harmonizing folk songs, rhythm-reading skills and sight-reading are included. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 111 or equivalent.

MUS 212 Aural Skills III

A continuation of MUS 113 through sight singing and ear training techniques that is focused on further developing the student’s ability to perform and transcribe more complex rhythms, scales, intervals, chords, melodies and scale degree patterns.  Material includes increased use of chromaticism and modulation.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 113 or equivalent course, or a score of 5 on the aural subscore of the AP Music Theory Exam.

MUS 213 Aural Skills IV

A continuation of MUS 212 through sight singing and ear training techniques that is focused on developing the student’s ability to perform and transcribe advanced rhythms, scales, intervals, chords, melodies and scale degree patterns.  Material includes increased use of compositional techniques since 1900.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 212 or an equivalent course.

MUS 215 Basic Conducting

Through this course the student will develop basic baton technique and score reading skills for choral and instrumental conducting.  The format will be a combination of lecture and laboratory experiences in which students will conduct and perform for each other.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Music majors only or permission of instructor.

MUS 217 Musicianship for Performing Arts III

Upper-intermediate sight-singing and piano skills tailored to the needs of performing arts majors.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 117, MUS 127, MUS 118, MUS 128.

MUS 220 Music for Dance

This course is designed to give both the dancer and the choreographer the necessary tools to realize their musical needs, as well as to learn how to communicate those needs to musicians. These tools can be divided into two categories: music fundamentals and music appreciation. Students also explore ethical issues in the reproduction and use of recorded music in the studio and on the stage.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

MUS 222 Music Theory III

A continuation of MUS 123 that explores vocabulary and conceptual frameworks for the analysis of 19th century, Romantic-style music, including the analysis of formal structures, chromatic harmony, modulation, enharmonicism and the acquisition of idiomatic compositional technique through practice and performance.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 123 or an equivalent course, or a score of 5 on the nonaural subscore of the AP Music Theory Exam

MUS 223 Music Theory IV

A continuation of MUS 222 that explores the divergent theories and aesthetics of Western music since 1900, with an emphasis on the acquisition of idiomatic compositional technique through analysis, practice, and performance.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

C or better in MUS 222 or an equivalent course.

MUS 224 Pedagogy

A study of pedagogical techniques for teaching studio lessons on the elementary and intermediate levels. Techniques include teaching in traditional style and new approaches using piano labs, recordings, compact discs, computers and MIDI accompaniments. Required for performance majors.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

MUS 225 Voice Techniques

A fundamental study of vocal techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 226 String Techniques

A fundamental study of string techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.
Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 228 Brass Techniques

A fundamental study of brass techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.
Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 229 Percussion Techniques

A fundamental study of percussion techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 230 Woodwind Techniques I: Single Reeds

A fundamental study of clarinet and saxophone techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 231 Woodwind Techniques II: Double Reeds and Flute

A fundamental study of flute, oboe and bassoon techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 232 Guitar Techniques

A fundamental study of guitar techniques, pedagogy and repertoire intended for Music Education and Music Performance majors.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Music majors only.

MUS 238 Music Theater Workshop

Studio/performance-oriented class focusing on musical preparation, analysis of scene/dramatic structure, incorporation of musical staging/blocking/choreography, and the development of performance techniques.

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

MUS 242 Career Development and Audition Seminar

A practicum course for performing arts majors. Studio class focusing on audition preparation for the musical theater, as well as emphasizing the business techniques required for a career in the performing arts.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Performing Arts majors only, or permission of instructor.

MUS 243 Performance Internship

For performing arts majors. Students are auditioned for placement in performance or theater-technical internships with local entertainment organizations. Special off-campus arrangements can be made with permission of the co-directors of the performing arts (musical theatre) program.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing. Musical theatre majors only.

MUS 245 Special Project in Music

Credit Hours: 1
(A)

Prerequisites

consent of project director.

MUS 246 Camerata

A small, select, chamber choir of women's voices. The ensemble performs a variety of challenging choral literature from all style periods, appropriate for a collegiate level women's chamber choir.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

Prerequisites

Audition or instructor permission required.

MUS 247-267 Studio Lessons

200-level studio lessons are for music majors or minors, and musical theatre majors studying in their primary performance area only. May be taken for 1 credit hour (25-minute weekly lessons), or 2 credit hours (50-minute weekly lessons). (Organ may be taken for 2 credit hours only.) Music majors usually study for 2 credit hours. Studio lessons courses may be repeated for credit.

 

247 Organ (2)

249 Harpsichord (1,2)

250 Piano (1,2)

251 Voice (1,2)

252 Flute (1,2)

253 Oboe (1,2)

254 Clarinet (1,2)

255 Bassoon (1,2)

256 Saxophone (1,2)

257 Trumpet (1,2)

258 French Horn (1,2)

259 Trombone (1,2)

260 Baritone (1,2)

261 Tuba (1,2)

262 Percussion (1,2)

263 Violin (1,2)

264 Viola (1,2)

265 Cello (1,2)

266 String Bass (1,2)

267 Classical Guitar (1,2)

271 Harp (1,2)

Credit Hours: 1-2
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors, Music minors, or Performing Arts (Musical Theatre) majors in their primary applied area only.

Corequisites

Enrollment in a Music Department ensemble related to the performance area of the Studio Lesson.

MUS 269 Recital/Concert Attendance

Observation of guest artist, faculty, and student performances for the purpose of developing greater musicianship. Requires attendance at scheduled Department of Music events.

Credit Hours: 0

MUS 270 Composition

May be repeated for additional credit. Taught as a studio lesson, this course guides the student in the acquisition of technique and aesthetic considerations for music composition through creative work and compositional exercises. Students may enroll for 1 credit hour (25-minute weekly lesson), or 2 credit hours (50-minute weekly lesson). Course requirements vary, depending on the number of credit hours being taken.  Students enrolled for 2 credit hours are expected to bring new work in progress to each lesson, and have a performance of at least one completed work presented in public during each semester of enrollment.

Credit Hours: 1-2
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 123 or permission of instructor

MUS 271-275 Studio Lessons

200-level Studio Lessons are for music majors or minors, and musical theatre majors studying in their primary performance area only. May be taken for 1 credit hour (25-minute weekly lessons), or 2 credit hours (50-minute weekly lessons). (Organ may be taken for 2 credit hours only.) Music majors usually study for 2 credit hours. Studio Lessons courses may be repeated for credit.

 

271 Harp (1, 2)

272 Contemporary Guitar (1,2)

273 Contemporary Piano (1,2)

274 Contemporary Bass (1,2)

275 Contemporary Percussion (1,2)

Credit Hours: 1-2
(A)

Prerequisites

Music majors, Music minors, or Performing Arts (Musical Theatre) majors in their primary applied area only.

Corequisites

Enrollment in a Music Department ensemble related to the performance area of the Studio Lesson.

MUS 289 Orchestra

A studio/performance-oriented course. A large ensemble of strings, woodwind, brass and percussion instruments that performs two or three times each semester, both on and off campus. The repertoire consists of major works, overtures, historical, contemporary and popular literature for orchestra and variable-sized ensembles. Auditions are held at the beginning of the fall and spring terms.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 290 Spartan Band

A studio/performance-oriented course. Spartan Band is open to all students with instrumental music experience. The Spartan Band performs a repertoire of up-tempo popular and jazz tunes at a variety of University and community events.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 291 Wind Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course. A large ensemble of woodwind, brass and percussion instruments that performs several times each semester, both on and off campus. The repertoire consists of major works, overtures, historical, contemporary and popular literature for band and variable-sized ensembles. Auditions are held at the beginning of the fall and spring terms.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 292 Jazz Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course. A big band of saxophones, trumpets, trombones and rhythm section with repertoire from traditional swing charts to contemporary jazz. The UT Jazz Ensemble performs two or three times each semester. Auditions are held at the beginning of the fall and spring terms.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 293 Chamber Singers

 

An auditioned chamber choir of mixed voices.  The University Chamber Singers gives several performances each semester.  Chamber Singers will travel regularly and serve the needs of the University and surrounding communities.  The repertoire, specifically suited for a select, collegiate-level chamber choir, will consist of varied and advanced choral music of all styles and genres.

 

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 294 Opus

A small, auditioned vocal ensemble of mixed voices. Membership is understood to be a yearlong commitment. The repertoire is drawn primarily from musical theater. Opus performs a major concert each semester. This ensemble is also frequently asked to perform for many University functions on campus as well as other venues in the Tampa Bay area.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 295 Women's Glee Club

A chorus of women who sing a varied repertoire in one to three parts.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 297 Men's Glee Club

The University of Tampa Men's Glee Club is an open-enrollment vocal ensemble for all tenors and basses. Students who have an interest in singing, regardless of major, are invited to enroll without audition. The UT Men's Glee will perform one or two concerts per semester. The course will focus on development of healthy vocal technique, sight-reading skills, and performance skills.

Credit Hours: 0-1

MUS 301 Interactive Arts Ensemble

IAE is a performance-driven creative workshop for physical interaction design, real-time video art, experimental musical instrument building, laptop ensembles, mobile phone orchestras, and creative repurposing of technology for interdisciplinary performance. Open to technophiles from any major who wish to experiment, create, and perform.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 302 Jazz Combo

A studio/performance-oriented course, this is a combo (small) ensemble of mixed instruments. Students will study and perform music in various contemporary styles such as rock, swing, rhythm and blues, traditional jazz, fusion jazz and world music-influenced styles. Rehearsals will focus on the preparation of music repertoire pertaining to the performance genres to which the combo is dedicated (to be determined collaboratively by faculty and students) as well as issues related to the business of music and freelance music performance.  

Credit Hours: 0-1

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

MUS 303 Studio Production Ensemble

The studio production ensemble is simultaneously a music performance ensemble, creative workshop, and a sound recording class for learning recording studio techniques.  Using an experiential approach, students rotate through various production roles to create music in a digital multi-track environment.  This course is intended for students who have an interest in working as a recording artist, studio musician, engineer, composer, arranger, or producer.  No audition is required, but students should be able to read music, play an instrument and or sing.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 108 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

MUS 307 Opera Workshop

Opera Workshop is an auditioned ensemble. It is open to vocal performance majors and students enrolled in voice lessons during the semester. Individuals will perform in staged ensemble scenes representing various style periods, which will be assigned according to students' voice type and technical ability.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 309 Performance Class

A studio/performance-oriented course. Students study and rehearse solo and small ensemble literature for their instruments. Required performance on monthly student recitals. Master classes with studio teachers may be included. Annual spring concert.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 310 String Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 311 Classical Guitar Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 312 Woodwind Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 313 Brass Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 314 Percussion Ensemble

A studio/performance-oriented course.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A)

MUS 315 Choral Conducting

A study of basic conducting techniques with practical application to choral ensembles.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 215

MUS 316 Instrumental Conducting

A study of basic conducting techniques with practical application to instrumental ensembles.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 215

MUS 323 Arranging and Orchestration

A study of how to effectively write music for acoustic instruments and voices. Includes discussion of arranging techniques such as composing introductions and transitions, chord voicing, reharmonization, and textural transcription.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 123

MUS 346 Junior Recital

A studio/performance-oriented course with required preview. All repertoire must be approved and coached by the studio instructor. See the UT Music Student Handbook for details. Students may enroll for zero credit if they are enrolled in 18 or more credit hours.

Credit Hours: 0-1

Corequisites

Applied music study in the primary instrument/voice used for the recital.

MUS 380 Music History Survey I: Antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque

A historical survey of Western musical tradition from the earliest known sources through the late Baroque (up to 1750). The overall objective is for the student to gain an understanding of basic developments in Western music from the beginnings in Ancient Greece, Rome, and Mesopotamia through the Baroque period. The course will include the study of both sacred and secular music in various genres and will place great emphasis on listening. The course is also designed to increase the students’ critical thinking skills and ability to write effectively about the aesthetics of Western music.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

MUS 103 or equivalent. Music majors only or permission of instructor.

MUS 381 Music History Survey II: 18th Century Classical Period and 19th Century Romanticism

A historical survey of Western musical tradition from the second half of the 18th century through the end of the 19th century. This course traces the development of Western music, both sacred and secular music in various genres, in the Classical and Romantic periods.  The course will place great emphasis on listening and study of music scores.  The course is also designed to increase the students’ critical thinking skills and ability to write effectively about the aesthetics of Western music.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

MUS 103 or equivalent. Music majors only or permission of the instructor.

MUS 390 Reading and Teaching Music - Elementary

A specialized music course that focuses on strategies, materials, and best-practice activities for teaching reading and fundamentals of elementary music.  Features demonstrations with class participation in singing and use of rhythmic and pre-orchestral instruments.  Requires observation and teaching in elementary schools.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Music Education majors only.

MUS 391 Music Class Management ESL Applications

This course emphasizes strategies for music classroom management through best practices in organization, lesson planning and pacing, record keeping, informal and formal assessments based on federal and state guidelines, parent conferences, behavior modification, crisis prevention and intervention, as well as a review of professional ethics, school law and its implications for teachers.  ESL training necessary for music education certification is included in this course.  Learning problems and needs of exceptional children (ESL, special education, diverse cultures, gifted) are addressed with appropriate teaching methodology.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Music Education majors only.

MUS 446 Senior Recital/Showcase

A studio/performance course with required preview. All repertoire must be approved and coached by the studio instructor. See the UT Music Student Handbook for details. Students may enroll for zero credit if they are enrolled in 18 or more credit hours.

Credit Hours: 0-1

Corequisites

Applied music study in the primary instrument/voice used for the recital.

MUS 450 Advanced Project in Music Theory

Guided readings, research and writings, culminating in a paper. May require a composition at the instructor's discretion. Also includes some supervised teaching of basic musicianship studies.

Credit Hours: 2

MUS 480 Music History Survey III: 1900 to Present Day

A historical survey of Western musical tradition from 1900 to the present. This course traces the development of Western music, both sacred and secular music since 1900.  This course will emphasize listening and study of music scores.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

MUS 103 or equivalent. Music majors only or permission of instructor.

MUS 490 Music Instruction and Assessment

A specialized methods course for Music Education majors.  Topics include secondary music teaching and assessment methods, curriculum materials, and planning for/management of band, choral, and orchestral programs.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Music Education majors only.

MUS 491 Music Internship 1 - Grades 1-8 (Elementary)

Culminating elementary-level field experience for Music Education majors. Provides progressive instructional responsibilities and opportunities for the application of content and professional knowledge as a music educator in Florida public schools. Interns are assigned to an elementary school for a half-day (time and number of periods varies by school to which assigned). This course may be taken concurrently with other UT courses. When taken concurrently with MUS 492 - Music Internship 2, these two courses combine for full-time enrollment status at the University.
Credit Hours: 6

Prerequisites

Music Education majors with senior standing and permission on instructor.

MUS 492 Music Internship 2 - Grades 6-12 (Secondary)

Culminating secondary-level field experience for Music Education majors. Provides progressive instructional responsibilities and opportunities for the application of content and professional knowledge as a music educator in Florida public schools. Interns are assigned to a secondary school for a half-day (time and number of periods varies by school to which assigned). This course may be taken concurrently with other UT courses. When taken concurrently with MUS 491 – Music Internship 1, these two courses combine for full-time enrollment status at the University.

Credit Hours: 6

Prerequisites

Music Education majors with senior standing and permission of instructor.

MUS 499 Senior Project in Music

A culminating project undertaken by a student with mentoring from a faculty member. Topics may vary according to the student’s interests (possibilities might include: projects in music composition, technology, performance, theory, musicology, pedagogy, etc.) Students are expected to develop a preliminary bibliography and proposal for their project in advance of being permitted to register for the course. Instructor and chair approval required.

Credit Hours: 3

6 credits of the following (4 credits must be taken at 200 level or higher):

Credit Hours:

6 credits of the following (4 credits must be taken at 200 level or higher):

Credit Hours:

ART Additional courses in concentration area

Credit Hours: 11

ART Additional courses in concentration area

Credit Hours: 12

ART Additional electives

Credit Hours: 11

Additional electives

Credit Hours: 24

ADPR Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ADPR Elective or General elective

Credit Hours: 4

ADPR Elective or General elective or Internship

Credit Hours: 4

ADPR Elective or General elective or Internship

Credit Hours: 4

ADPR Elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

American History

Credit Hours: 8

and

Credit Hours:

and

Credit Hours:

and

Credit Hours:

and

Credit Hours:

and

Credit Hours:

And one of the following courses:

Credit Hours:

And one of the following courses:

Credit Hours:

And one of the following courses:

Credit Hours:

And two of the following courses:

Credit Hours:

And three of the following courses:

Credit Hours:

and/or

Credit Hours:

and/or

Credit Hours:

and/or

Credit Hours:

and/or

Credit Hours:

Any combination of other professional (ESC) activity courses

Credit Hours: 4

Any foreign language

Credit Hours: 4

ART 300 plus Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Art/Aesthetic

Credit Hours: 3

Art/Aesthetic courses

Credit Hours: 5

Electives

Credit Hours: 11

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 7

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 9

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 2

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 8

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ART Elective

Credit Hours: 6

ART Electives

Credit Hours: 10

Art Electives (300 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

ART 269-276 Art history

Credit Hours: 4

Baccalaureate/Electives

Credit Hours: 2

Baccalaureate/Electives

Credit Hours: 4

Baccalaureate/Electives

Credit Hours: 5

Baccalaureate Experience course

Credit Hours: 3-4

Baccalaureate Experience course

Credit Hours: 3

Baccalaureate Experience course

Credit Hours: 3-4

Baccalaureate Experience course

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Course

Credit Hours: 3

BIO Biology elective

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Category I course

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Category II course

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Category II Course

Credit Hours: 3-4

BIO Category III course

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Category III course

Credit Hours: 3-4

BIO Category III course

Credit Hours: 3

BIO Category requirement (I, II or III)

Credit Hours: 3

BIO Category requirement (I, II or III)

Credit Hours: 4

BIO Category requirement (I, II or III)

Credit Hours: 4

BIO BIO Category requirement (I, II or III)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Biological Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3

Biology Core Curriculum

Credit Hours: 25

Biology core curriculum (without Genetics)

Credit Hours: 21

BIO/MAR Natural Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 3

BIO Pre-Professional elective

Credit Hours: 4

BOTH: 8

Credit Hours:

Capstone Experience: Internship, The Minaret or Senior Project

Credit Hours: 4

Cellular biology/physiological course (Category I)

Credit Hours: 3-4

CHE Course

Credit Hours: 3

CHE Course

Credit Hours: 3

CHE/PHY Natural Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 3

Chemical/Physical Science

Credit Hours: 4

Choose two of the following:

Credit Hours:

COB core, speech, and math requirements

Credit Hours: 56

COM 300 level Critical Studies

Credit Hours: 4

COM 400 level Critical Studies

Credit Hours: 4

COM Concentration Course

Credit Hours: 4

COM Core Elective in Media, Culture and Society

Credit Hours: 4

COM Core Elective in Production

Credit Hours: 4

COM Core Elective in Writing

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM Portfolio Review

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective in Writing, Culture & Society, Visual Aesthetics or Sound Image and Motion

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective in Writing, Culture & Society, Visual Aesthetics or Sound Image and Motion

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective in Writing, Culture & Society, Visual Aesthetics or Sound Image and Motion

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

COM Elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

COM FMA Elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM FMA Elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM FMA Elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

COM FMA Elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

COM or General elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM or General elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM or General elective

Credit Hours: 4

COM/WRI Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

COM/WRI Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

Concentration

Credit Hours: 23-32

CRM Elective

Credit Hours: 4

CRM Select one course from Category 1, 2 or 3

Credit Hours: 4

CRM One Course

Credit Hours: 4

CRM Select one course from Behavioral category

Credit Hours: 4

DAN Dance Elective (optional)

Credit Hours: 2

Decisions Analysis Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ITM Decisions Analysis Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ECO Economics elective

Credit Hours: 4

ECO Economics elective

Credit Hours: 4

ECO Electives

Credit Hours: 16

ECO/IB Economics elective

Credit Hours: 4

Elective

Credit Hours: 1-2

Elective

Credit Hours: 2

Elective

Credit Hours: 2-3

Elective

Credit Hours: 3

Elective

Credit Hours: 3

Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Elective

Credit Hours: 5

Elective

Credit Hours: 5-6

Elective

Credit Hours: 6-7

Electives

Credit Hours: 7

Electives

Credit Hours: 8

Electives 10-13 credits

Credit Hours:

ADPR Elective

Credit Hours: 4

CRM Elective from Behavioral Organizational or Law category

Credit Hours: 4

JOU, WRI, or COM Elective

Must be outside of student's major and with consent of minor adviser.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM Elective from Organizational or Behavioral Category

Credit Hours: 4

Electives

Credit Hours: 11

Electives

Credit Hours: 12

Electives

Credit Hours: 1-2

Electives

Credit Hours: 5-6

Electives

Credit Hours: 2-3

Electives

Credit Hours: 6

Electives above BIO 204 or MAR 200

Credit Hours: 7-8

Electives (see below)

Credit Hours:

Elective (W)

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 200 level British Literature II, or American Literature I, or American Literature II

Credit Hours: 4

ENG Choose from Poetry Writing I, Fiction Writing I, Creative Writing I, Technical Writing, or other Writing Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 200 level English Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 200 level English 200 level English Language, Rhetoric, or Advanced Composition course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 200 level English 200 level Introduction to Literatures and Interpertations course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level English Major Authors or elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level English Period or Genre Course or English elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 200 level literature course

ENG 200, ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 206, ENG 207, ENG 208, ENG 209, ENG 211, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 220, ENG 229, ENG 238, ENG 240, ENG 249, ENG 250, ENG 251, ENG 253, ENG 257, ENG 270-278, ENG 282-289
Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level literature course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 400 level Literature Course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level English Major Authors or Major Poets Course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level Major Genre/Historical Period Course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 400 level 400 level Seminar in Poetry Writing, or Seminar in Fiction Writing, Professional Writing Internship or Writing Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 100 or 200 level English Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 or 400 level English elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENG 300 or 400 level English elective

Credit Hours: 4

Engineering Calculus

Credit Hours: 4

ENG or LIT English or literature courses

Credit Hours: 8

ENG 300 or 400 level Major author or period course

Credit Hours: 4

ENG/WRI English or writing elective

Credit Hours: 4

ENT Any course, except internships and independent studies

Credit Hours:

ENT Entrepreneurship elective

Credit Hours: 4

ESC Professional Activity Course

Credit Hours: 2

Fine Arts - art music dance drama

Credit Hours: 3

FIN Finance elective

Credit Hours: 4

FIN Finance elective

Credit Hours: 4

FIN/IB Finance elective

Credit Hours: 4

Foreign Language

Credit Hours: 4

Four additional PHY or AST courses above the 300-level

Credit Hours: 16

General / Collateral elective

Credit Hours: 4

General / Collateral elective

Credit Hours: 4

General elective (200 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective (200 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General elective (300 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective (300 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective (300 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective (300 level or above)

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 1

General Elective

Credit Hours: 1-2

General Elective

Credit Hours: 1-2

General Elective

Credit Hours: 1-3

General Elective

Credit Hours: 2

General Elective

Credit Hours: 2-5

General Elective

Credit Hours: 2-5

General Elective

Credit Hours: 3

General Elective

Credit Hours: 3

General Elective

Credit Hours: 3-4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 3-4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4-5

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4-5

General Elective

Credit Hours: 4-6

General Electives

Credit Hours: 5

General Elective

Credit Hours: 6

General Electives

Credit Hours: 6-7

General Electives

Credit Hours: 6-7

General Elective

Credit Hours: 7

General Elective

Credit Hours: 7

General Elective

Credit Hours: 8

General Electives

Credit Hours: 11

General Elective

Credit Hours: 12

General Elective (IG) (NW)

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

General Elective (NW)

Credit Hours: 4
(NW)

General elective or internship

Credit Hours: 4

General Elective (W)

W
Credit Hours: 4

General or CRM electives

Credit Hours: 9

General or CRM Electives

Credit Hours: 12

General Elective (Humanities/Fine Arts)

Credit Hours: 4

GTW 101 Gateways / Pathways to Honors 1

Credit Hours: 1

Cross Listed Courses

HON 101

GTW 102 Gateways II / Pathways to Honors 2

Credit Hours: 1

Cross Listed Courses

HON 102

GWA 200 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 level Law and Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 level Law and Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 plus level Major Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 plus level World Affairs elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 or 300 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200 or 300 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200+ level Law and Government elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200+ level Major Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 200+ level World Affairs elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300 level Law and Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300 level Law and Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level American Government elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level Law and Government elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level Major Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level Major Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level World Affairs elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 300+ level World Affairs elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 400 level American Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA 400 level Law and Government Elective

Credit Hours: 4

GWA World Affairs elective

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 100 level History course

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 200 level History course

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 300 level History course

Credit Hours: 4

HIS 400 level History course

Credit Hours: 4

HIS History elective

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities/Fine Arts

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 1-2

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 2

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 2

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 2-4

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities Fine Arts (Bacc Exp)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities / Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4
A, IG, NW, W

Humanities/Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities / Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4
A, IG, NW, W

Humanities/Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Humanities/Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities/Fine Arts or Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities/Fine Arts & Non-Western Besides Music (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Humanities (not Theatre)

Credit Hours: 4

IBS Any course not already taken, except internships and independent studies

Credit Hours:

International Global (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3-4

International - Global Non-Western Course (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 3-4

International Studies

Credit Hours: 8

IST Elective

Credit Hours: 4

IST Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ITM Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ITM Electives - not lower than ITM 251

Credit Hours: 8

ITM/FIN FSOS Elective

Credit Hours: 4

ITM/MIS Elective

Credit Hours: 4

JOU Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

JOU Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

JOU Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

JOU/WRI/COM Elective for Journalism Major

Credit Hours: 4

ENG Literature Choice

Credit Hours: 4

LIT 400 level Literature choice ENG/LIT 400 level

Credit Hours: 4

LIT 300 level Literature choice ENG/LIT 300 level

Credit Hours: 4

Literature elective at 300 or 400 level

Credit Hours: 4

Marine Ecology

Credit Hours: 5

Marine Fisheries Management

Credit Hours: 5

Marine Ichthyology

Credit Hours: 6

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Credit Hours: 6

Marine Mammals

Credit Hours: 5

Marine Science II: Marine Biology

Credit Hours: 5

Marine Science I: Oceanography

Credit Hours: 5

300 level Course

Credit Hours: 4

MAT 300 level or higher Course

Credit Hours: 4

MAT MAT Elective

Credit Hours: 4

MAT Elective

Credit Hours: 4

MGT Any course not already taken, except internships and independent studies

Credit Hours:

MGT Management elective

Credit Hours: 4

MKT Marketing elective

Credit Hours: 4

MKT Marketing elective

Credit Hours: 4

MUS 251-269 Voice/Recital-Concert Attendance (minimum of one each semester enrolled)

Credit Hours: 1-6

MUS 251 Voice

Credit Hours: 1-2

MUS Elective

Credit Hours: 3

students with instrumental or vocal primary applied areas take:

Credit Hours:

students with instrumental primary applied area take:

Credit Hours:

students with instrumental primary applied area take one of the following:

Credit Hours:

students with instrumental primary applied area take one of the following:

Credit Hours:

students with vocal primary applied area take:

Credit Hours:

students with vocal primary applied area take one of the following:

Credit Hours:

MUS Ensemble (Minimum of 1 per semester)

Credit Hours: 0-1

MUS MUS Ensembles (minimum of one each semester enrolled)

Credit Hours: 8

MUS Music electives: any courses

Credit Hours: 11

MUS Music electives: any courses

Credit Hours: 9

MUS Music Electives

Credit Hours: 2

MUS Music Electives: any courses

Credit Hours: 2

TEST narrative elective

Credit Hours:

Natural Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Natural Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Natural Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3

Natural Sciences

Credit Hours: 3

(not for English education majors)

Credit Hours:

(not for PE or music education majors)

Credit Hours:

NUR Elective

Credit Hours: 3

NUR Elective

Credit Hours: 3

One of the following:

Credit Hours:

Optional Grad Course In Ed

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

or

Credit Hours:

Organismal biology course (Category II)

Credit Hours: 4

PHL Electives Including as options either REL 205 or REL 288, but not both

Credit Hours: 24

Philosophy electives

Credit Hours: 16

Philosophy electives

Credit Hours: 12

PHL 200 level Philosophy elective

Credit Hours: 4

PHL 200 or 300 level Philosophy elective

Credit Hours: 4

PHL 300 level Philosophy elective

Credit Hours: 4

PHY/CHE Natural Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 3

Physical or Chemical Science

Credit Hours: 3

Physics Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Choose from: Poetry Writing I Fiction Writing I or News Reporting and Writing or other Writing elective

Credit Hours: 4

PSY 200 level Satisfy emphasis requirements as needed

Credit Hours: 4

PSY 300 level Satisfy emphasis requirements as needed

Credit Hours: 4

PSY 300+ level Satisfy emphasis requirements as needed

Credit Hours: 4

PSY 300+ level Satisfy emphasis requirements as needed

Credit Hours: 4

PSY 400+ level Satisfy emphasis requirements as needed

Credit Hours: 4

Research Study Program — Lab

Credit Hours: 4

Research Study Program — Lecture

Credit Hours: 1

CRM Select one course from Law category

Credit Hours: 4

CRM Select one course from Organizational category

Credit Hours: 4

Select one of the following:

Credit Hours:

Select one of the following:

Credit Hours:

300 or 400 level Seminar in Poetry Writing, or Seminar in Fiction Writing, or Writing elective

Credit Hours: 4

Shark Biology

Credit Hours: 5

SOC 100 level Elective

Credit Hours:

SOC 200 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SOC 200 level plus Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SOC 300 plus level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SOC 300 plus level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SOC Electives

Credit Hours: 8

SOC Electives

Credit Hours: 16

Social Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 8

Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3-4

Social Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 2

Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 3

Social Science (Bacc. Exp)

Credit Hours: 4

Social Science (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Social Science (Bacc Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4
(IGN)(NW)

Social Sciences (IG)

Credit Hours: 3

Social Sciences (IG)

Credit Hours: 4

Social Sciences (NW)

Credit Hours: 4

Social Sciences (NW)

Credit Hours: 3

Social Science or Humanities/Fine Arts (Bacc. Exp.)

Credit Hours: 4

Social Sciences

Credit Hours: 4

SPA 300 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SPA 300 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SPA 400 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

SPA 300 or above Electives

Credit Hours: 16

Supervised Internship in TESOL

Credit Hours: 4

Three Electives

Credit Hours: 12

LIT 300+ Two Literature courses LIT/ENG 300 level or higher

Credit Hours: 8

with

Credit Hours:

with

Credit Hours:

with

Credit Hours:

with

Credit Hours:

with

Credit Hours:

WRI Choose from Poetry Writing II, Fiction Writing II, Nonfiction Narrative, or Technical and Professional Editing or other Writing Elective

Credit Hours: 4

WRI 300 or 400 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

WRI Writing course

Credit Hours: 4

WRI 300 level Elective

Credit Hours: 4

Internship in TESOL

Credit Hours: 4

NAV 1110 Introduction to Naval Science

Emphasis on the mission, organization, regulations and components of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 1110L Naval Science Laboratory

A twice weekly hour and fifteen minute laboratory covering professional and military subject matter.  Attendance is mandatory for all midshipmen.
Credit Hours: 0

NAV 1140 Seapower and Maritime Affairs

This course deals with the importance of seapower in historical events, including emphasis on worldwide political-military confrontations following the Cold War.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 2121 Naval Ships Systems I

Types, structures and purpose of naval ships. Hydrodynamic forces, stability compartmentalization, electrical, and auxiliary systems. Theory of design and operation of steam turbine, gas turbine, and nuclear propulsion plants. Shipboard safety and firefighting.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 2212C Navigation/Naval Operations I: Navigation

Piloting theory, principles and procedures; tides, currents, weather, use of navigation instruments and equipment, and practicum. Laboratory required.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 2220 Evolution of Warfare

A survey of military history emphasizing principles of warfare, strategy and tactics, and significant military leaders and organizations.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 2231 Principles of Naval Management I

Theory and principles of management, focusing on the officer-manager as an organizational decision maker. Includes interpersonal skills, behavior factors, and group dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 2931 Directed Study in Naval ROTC

Prerequisite: Permission of professor of naval science.  Intensive individualized study in particular aspects of naval science that are not covered in regular course offerings. Enrollment is recommended for NROTC students who anticipate attending the Naval Science Institute in Newport, RI, during sophomore/junior summer. Course content and title may vary from term to term.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Permission of professor of naval science.

NAV 3123 Naval Ships Systems II

Prerequisite: NAV 2121.  Capabilities and limitations of fire control systems and weapons types. Physical aspects of radar and underwater sound for target acquisition, threat analysis, tracking, weapons selection, delivery, and guidance. Explosives, fusing, and Naval ordnance.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

NAV 2121.

NAV 3214C Navigation/Naval Operations II: Seamanship and Ship Operations

Prerequisite: NAV 2212C.  International and inland rules of the road; relative motion-vector analysis; ship handling, employment and tactics; afloat communications; operations analysis. Laboratory required.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

NAV 2212C.

NAV 4224 Amphibious Warfare

History of amphibious warfare emphasizing doctrine and techniques as well as an understanding of the interrelations of political, strategic, operational, tactical, and technical levels of war from the past.

Credit Hours: 3

NAV 4232 Principles of Naval Management II (Leadership and Ethics)

Prerequisite: NAV 2231.  Integration of professional competencies and qualities of effective leadership with emphasis on moral and ethical responsibilities, accountability, communications and military law for the junior officer.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

NAV 2231.

NUR 201 Foundations of Nursing

For basic students only. This course introduces students to the foundations of professional nursing practice. Topics include historical, philosophical and theoretical perspectives in nursing. In addition, the concepts of caring, communication, critical thinking and cultural competence are introduced. Emphasis is placed upon self-care, the nursing process, nursing theory, and legal and ethical aspects of nursing.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Acceptance to the nursing program.

NUR 210 Intro to Pathophysiology

For basic students only. This course provides students with a basic understanding of pathophysiology from a structural and functional organizational framework. It builds upon the student's knowledge in the sciences, and explores how alterations in structure and function disrupt the body as a whole. Physiological changes across the lifespan are examined. Students utilize critical thinking to analyze selected diseases for symptomatology, pathophysiology and implications for health care intervention.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 201.

NUR 213 Professional Skills in Nursing

For basic students only.  (NUR 213 and NUR 213L must be taken concurrently).  This course gives students the cognitive knowledge necessary to provide basic, safe, and effective care to diverse populations.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 201

NUR 213L Professional Skills in Nursing Lab

 

For basic students only.  This course provides the student with laboratory and clinical experiences directed toward the acquisition of foundational knowledge and skills to give safe, effective patient care to diverse populations.  Focus is placed on the application of foundational knowledge learned in NUR 213.  Experiences include lab and interactive computer activities, simulation experiences, and supervised clinical learning at selected health care facilities.

 

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 201, NUR 213

NUR 218 Health Assessment and 218L

For basic students only. (NUR 218 and 218L must be taken concurrently.) This course provides the basic nursing student with knowledge and skills to obtain and record a health history and physical examination. Assessing the level of health and wellness of clients throughout the lifespan also is included. The course provides both a didactic and laboratory experience.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 201

NUR 314 Nursing Care of the Developing Family

For basic students only.  In this course, knowledge from the physical, biological, behavioral and social sciences as well as the humanities, is applied for the provision of safe nursing care of child-bearing families.  In a classroom setting, methodologies including case studies and interactive activities form the basis for the student to use the nursing process as a framework for addressing developmental change, illness prevention, health promotion, maintenance and restoration in child-bearing families.  Particular emphasis will be placed on the prenatal, intrapartum and postnatal period. 

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core

Corequisites

NUR 314L.

NUR 314L Nursing Care of the Developing Family Laboratory

For basic students only. The course provides students the opportunity to apply the concepts associated with responses of families during the childbearing cycle through a combination of laboratory and supervised clinical practice activities. Clinical experiences occur under faculty supervision in a variety of childbearing patient care settings.

Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

NUR 314.

NUR 315 Nursing Care of Children

For basic students only. This course presents the essential concepts, theories and developmental processes vital in understanding the health concerns and problems of children, adolescents and their families. Students examine family-centered nursing care in the health promotion and health maintenance of infants, children and adolescents.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core

Corequisites

NUR 315L

NUR 315L Nursing Care of Children Laboratory

For basic students only. This course provides students the opportunity to apply the essential concepts, theories and processes useful in meeting the health and developmental needs of children and their families. Learning experiences are provided to emphasize the role of the nurse and continuity of care in meeting the needs of children and families in acute care and community settings.

Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

NUR 315.

NUR 317 Nursing Care of Adult and Older Adult

For basic students only. This course explores the concepts and theories necessary to promote and restore health of adults and older adults with biological problems and their related physiological and psychological responses. There is an integration of both physical changes and developmental tasks with the implementation of care considerations of pathients throughtout the life span.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core. Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 317L, NUR 345, NUR 347

NUR 317L Nursing Care of Adult and Older Adult Laboratory

This course provides students the opportunity to apply concepts and processes learned in the classroom to help adults and older adults in the promotion and maintenance of health. Students examine both adults and older adults from physical, social, psychological and developmental perspectives through a combination of supervised clinical practice activities. Clinical experiences will occur under faculty supervision in a variety of both acute and long-term patient care settings. 140 clinical hours are provided during the semester.
Credit Hours: 2

Corequisites

NUR 317

NUR 322 Contemporary Issues in Health Care

For basic and pre-MSN students. The health care delivery system is examined from political, economic, legal and ethical perspectives with particular emphasis on the written analysis of legal and ethical dilemmas related to the practice of nursing.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

NUR 345 Pharmacology

For basic students only. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pharmacology and therapeutics in the treatment of illness, and the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health in patients across the lifespan. The major drug categories are reviewed with emphasis placed on the therapeutic use, action and adverse reaction, as well as benefits and risks to the drug therapy. This prepares the health professional for safe, therapeutic pharmacological interventions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core

Corequisites

NUR 317

NUR 346 Expressive Art in Healing

Subtitle: Health Promotion through the Arts. This course examines creativity through a variety of expressive art forms to promote healing for clients and to heal the healer, an imperative for holistic nurses. Various art forms are explored, including visual arts, mask-making, visual and written journals, storytelling, movement and others. Students experience expressive arts through guided exercises and art practices.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

NUR 347 Clinical Human Nutrition

For basic students only. This course provides information on the fundamentals of nutrition and application. Nutritional needs across the lifespan and nutritional support in selected disorders are specifically discussed.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core

NUR 392 Transcultural Healthcare in Latin America

All students: permission of instructor. This course allows students to travel to a selected Latin American country to apply community health promotion and disease prevention concepts in a transcultural environment.(once annually)

Credit Hours: 3
(IG)

Prerequisites

NUR 301 (RN to BSN), or 200 level courses (Basic BSN), or HSC 120 or 236 and HSC 350 or PSY 211 (ESC students). Co- or NUR 318 and 322 (RN to BSN).

NUR 400 Cultural Diversity in Health Care

This course explores interrelationships between diversity, socio-cultural, economic and political contexts of health and illness. It increases the student's awareness of the biological variation, time and space perception, spiritual dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people with diverse world views. There is focus on specific cultural groups including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans and selected additional ethnically diverse groups.

Credit Hours: 3

NUR 410 Mental Health Nursing Across the Lifespan

For basic students only. This course examines the biological, environmental, cultural and interpersonal factors that predispose individuals to mental illness. Mental health is viewed as the continuous adaptation to the inevitable stressors of life, and deviations are a result of the inability of individuals to adapt to life's stressors. Individuals are viewed holistically across the lifespan.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of 300 level nursing core

Corequisites

NUR 410L

NUR 410L Mental Health Nursing Across the Lifespan Laboratory

For basic students only. The course provides students the opportunity to apply the concepts of mental health nursing through a combination of laboratory and supervised clinical practice. Clinical experiences occur under faculty supervision in a variety of settings in which patients and families with acute and chronic mental health problems may be found.

Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

NUR 410.

NUR 412 Nursing Care of the Medically-Complex Patient

For basic students only. This course examines advanced concepts related to patients experiencing complex multi-system biological problems and related physiological and psychological responses.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Completion of 300 level nursing core. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 412L

NUR 412L Nursing Care of the Medically-Complex Patient Laboratory

For basic students only. The course provides the opportunity for students to apply advanced concepts and processes required to help adults with complex multi-system problems. Students examine adults from physical, social, psychological and developmental perspectives through a combination of laboratory and supervised clinical practice activities. Clinical experiences occur under faculty supervision in a variety of acute care settings.

Credit Hours: 3

Corequisites

NUR 412.

NUR 415 Leadership and Management

For basic students, or with instructor approval. This course examines key concepts in leadership and management within the health care system. Emphasis is on organizing and delivering health care, assessing financial resources, planning, managing human resources, improving quality and promoting positive change.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

For basic students, completion of 300-level nursing core

NUR 422 Principles of Community Health Nursing

For basic students. This course focuses on the community health system by examining it from historical, organizational and political perspectives. Emphases are on analysis of epidemiological trends and the relevance of community assessment to community health nursing practice. The impact of local, state and federal legislation is explored related to the impact on community health.

Credit Hours: 3

Corequisites

NUR 422L

NUR 422L Community Health Laboratory

For basic students only. The course provides the opportunity to synthesize and apply cognitive knowledge of community health nursing. Through supervised clinical practice, students provide culturally competent care to individuals, families and groups in a variety of community agencies. This course includes 4 hours of clinical per week plus a class seminar. For those students enrolled in the travel section of NUR 422L, 40 clinical hours will be gained through education abroad; the additional requisite hours will be completed in a local community setting plus a class seminar.

Credit Hours: 2

Corequisites

NUR 422

NUR 423 Palliative Care

This course will review the key concepts of palliative care and end-of-life nursing care. Topics covered utilizing the End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) training modules will include: pain and symptom management, ethical issues, cultural considerations, communication techniques, care during the final hours of life, and loss, grief and bereavement. In addition, the practice of palliative care in special populations and in various settings will be discussed. This course will be highly interactive and will include opportunities to hear from guest speakers that are experts in the field of palliative and end-of-life care.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Completion of 200 level nursing core.

NUR 430 Holistic Care: Alternative Therapies for Self-Care and Professional Practice

Open to non-nursing students. This course examines alternative health practices from a cross-cultural perspective. Healing interventions such as acupuncture, biofeedback, homeopathy, meditation, and traditional Chinese and herbal medicine are studied and demonstrated by practitioners. Emphases are on the historical underpinnings of holistic health practices and the political/economic ramifications on global health. This course also compares and contrasts nontraditional modalities of health care with industrial models.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NW)

NUR 432 Introduction to Nursing Research

For basic students and pre-MSN students.  Students will learn about discipline-specific writing and research processes for nursing studies and engage nursing research through formal and informal writing work.

Credit Hours: 2
(W)

Prerequisites

For basic students: NUR 201 and statistics

NUR 450 Independent Study in Nursing

An independent study that provides students with an opportunity to pursue a topic or project under the guidance of a nursing faculty member. By permission of instructor and department director. May include a practicum.

Credit Hours: 1-3

NUR 451-459 Selected Topics in Nursing

For elective credit only. An in-depth study of a selected nursing topic of concern to students and faculty. Emphasis is on contemporary issues affecting nursing and health care.

Credit Hours: 1-3

NUR 452 Clinical Preceptorship

For basic students only. This course focuses on the integration, analysis, and synthesis of knowledge acquired throughout the nursing curriculum. The student utilizes knowledge from the physical, biological and behavioral sciences to provide safe, high quality, culturally competent nursing care. Critical thinking skills are further developed. The student incorporates principles of teaching and learning to promote, maintain and restore health.

Credit Hours: 5

Prerequisites

NUR 412, NUR 412L

NUR 454 Senior Seminar

For basic students only. This seminar course addresses professional role transition and assists the student in preparing for the NCLEX-RN licensure examination.

Credit Hours: 2

Corequisites

NUR 415

NUR 465 Improving Healthcare Outcomes

Focuses on identifying and analyzing health care problems using a Microsystems framework. Discusses high volume, high priority clinical problems common to primary, secondary, and tertiary health care facilities. Emphasizes exploration of current best evidence on a variety of clinical problems. Provides a foundation for the development of an evidence-based project grounded in a Microsystems approach.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

NUR 300 level courses.

NUR 600 Scholarly and Professional Communication in Nursing

For graduate students only.  This course focuses on communication skills and strategies for nursing professionals. Students will develop the ability to construct logical and appropriately referenced papers and presentations in nursing. Students will practice writing position papers, policy issue briefs, nursing theory applications and nursing research proposals, and conducting nursing education presentations.  Must be taken in first academic term.

Credit Hours: 3

NUR 601 Professional Issues and the Nurse Practitioner

For graduate students only.  This course focuses on current practice issues related to the emerging role of the nurse practitioner in health care delivery.  Emphases are on critical review and analysis or role implementation strategies, and role performance as a clinician, educator, case manager, leader, consultant and colleague.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or Corerequisite: NUR 600 or GRE equivalent.

NUR 605 Theory Development in Nursing

For graduate students only. Emphasizes theory development in nursing science in terms of historical perspective, concept formulation and available models. Selected theories are analyzed.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR 601.

NUR 615 Nursing Research

For graduate students only. Focuses on research process and the use of evidence-based practice. Provides opportunity for development of a research proposal or evidence-based practice project.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 601 and statistics.

NUR 618 Advanced Health Assessment and Lab

For graduate students only. This course builds on the competencies acquired in a baccalaureate nursing assessment course, and expands expertise in completing comprehensive assessment and developing diagnostic reasoning skills. The course includes a laboratory experience.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 601, 605 and 615.

NUR 623 Palliative Care

This course will review the key concepts of palliative care and end-of-life nursing care. Topics covered utilizing the End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) training modules will include: pain and symptom management, ethical issues, cultural considerations, communication techniques, care during the final hours of life, and loss, grief and bereavement. In addition, the practice of palliative care in special populations and in various settings will be discussed. This course will be highly interactive and will include opportunities to hear from guest speakers that are experts in the field of palliative and end-of-life care.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Graduate student status.

NUR 645 Clinical Pharmacology

For graduate students only. This course emphasizes the clinical application of the major classifications of drugs and the development of knowledge needed by the advanced practice nurse to assure that drug therapy is based on sound therapeutic judgments and decision-making processes. A lifespan approach is utilized to address client needs of drug therapy in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings. Statutory authority for prescription writing protocols is examined.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

NUR 655. Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 601, 605, and 615.

NUR 647 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Families and Communities

For graduate students only.   This course provides the opportunity for the advanced practice nurse to understand and integrate health promotion and disease prevention concepts in a patient centered, culturally appropriate way.  This includes principles of planning, implementation, and evaluation of evidenced based care to individuals, families, and communities. 

Credit Hours: 3

NUR 655 Advanced Pathophysiology

For graduate students only. This course addresses the concepts that contribute to alterations in health status of clients throughout the life cycle. Concepts of focus include the cellular environment, altered tissue biology, and principles of genetics as they apply to health status, immunity and cellular proliferation.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Prerequisites or corequisites: NUR 601, 605 and 615.

NUR 660 Health Policy Development

For graduate students only.  Focuses on the analysis, application and synthesis of selected health policy concepts, models and theories. Leadership qualities needed to influence the political system at all stages in the policy process will be incorporated. Emphasis is on issues of importance to the continued development and empowerment of the nursing profession. Provides students with an opportunity to examine the relationship of political advocacy to all phases of the policy process.

Credit Hours: 3

NUR 665 Improving Healthcare Outcomes

For graduate students only.  Focuses on identifying and analyzing health care problems using a Microsystems framework. Discusses high volume, high priority clinical problems common to primary, secondary, and tertiary health care facilities. Emphasizes exploration of current best evidence on a variety of clinical problems. Provides a foundation for the development of an evidence-based project grounded in a Microsystems approach.

Credit Hours: 3

NUR 675 Practicum in Adult Primary Care I

This practic