Catalog 2021-2022

Course Descriptions

Course designations: Art/Aesthetic (A); Humanities/Fine Arts (HFA); International Global Awareness (IG); Natural Science (NS); Non-Western (NW); Social Science (SS); Studio/Performance (ST); Writing Intensive (W).

ACC 099 Non-Credit Service Requirement for Accounting Majors

All accounting majors must complete 30 hours of service. At least 30 days prior to graduation, accounting majors must submit the ACC 099 Class Registration form along with documentation of service hours to the department chair for approval. Acceptable documentation includes a co-curricular transcript issued by the Office of Student Leadership and Engagement, Beta Alpha Psi service hour documentation, Delta Sigma Phi service hour documentation, a letter from an officer of a service organization or other verifiable documents of service. The faculty member who is responsible for managing the service requirement will review the documents and submit a passing grade to the registrar for completion of the requirement.

Credit Hours: 0

ACC 202 Financial Accounting Information

ACC 202 focuses on the external financial reporting of enterprises. The course examines the creation, flow and analysis of enterprise financial information, including the income statement, balance sheet, statement of retained earnings and cash flow statement in accordance with accepted accounting principles. Students conduct introductory Internet research on published company financial information.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

Corequisites

BAC 100

ACC 203 Managerial Accounting

ACC 203 focuses on the concepts, systems, procedures and decision models that help managers analyze, interpret and improve business results. Managerial accounting encompasses various systems for calculating the cost of a product or service; tools for the evaluation of business segments; models for making decisions concerning a variety of special decisions; planning and budgeting for operations and capital items; and exposure to ethical norms and dilemmas in the context of accounting and finance. The course includes Excel spreadsheet applications.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202, MAT 150 or higher (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ACC 304 Cost Accounting

ACC 304 helps students apply cost accounting methods in a variety of organizational business settings by developing accounting information that is timely, relevant and useful for formulating strategy, making non-routine decisions and planning and controlling operations. Topics covered include cost accumulation, assignment and behavior; planning, budgeting, evaluating and controlling operations; and tactical decision-making.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202 and ACC 203, MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225), QMB 210.

ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting I

This course expands the students’ understanding of generally accepted accounting principles. The theory covered includes the FASB’s conceptual framework, FASB codification of accounting standards, international financial reporting standards and the accounting process. This theoretical background is then applied to the preparation of financial statements and the use of time-value of money concepts to measure financial statement elements, revenue recognition and accounting for cash, receivables, inventories and long-term assets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225), BAC 100 and a grade of "C" or higher in ACC 202.

ACC 351 Accounting Information Systems

ACC 351 is a pragmatic study of accounting information systems. The course covers accounting systems concepts, systems documentation, transaction processing systems, database systems, e-accounting systems, accounting software systems, enterprise systems, systems acquisition/development, systems security/control and emerging issues related to accounting systems and their supporting information technologies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 202, ACC 203, ACC 320, ITM 220.

ACC 352 Federal Tax Accounting I

ACC 352 covers the U.S. federal taxation system, concentrating on issues of individual taxation. There is significant emphasis on research tools and technology in the taxation field. Formal and informal written assignments enhance student understanding of the impact of taxation to decision making. Skills learned include how to undertake research and communicate the results in a cogent understandable manner. Students complete a volunteer tax clinic during the spring term, requiring some evening or weekend commitment. Successful completion of the volunteer project partially fulfills the ACC 099 service requirement.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ACC 202.

ACC 401 Auditing and Attestation

ACC 401 covers generally accepted auditing and attestation standards, professional ethics, auditing and attestation reporting requirements and objectives. The course includes topics on the auditing profession, audit reports, professional ethics, audit responsibilities and objectives, audit evidence, audit planning, materiality and risk, and other assurance and non-assurance services. Students will complete a series of formal and informal auditing-specific writing assignments to develop practical audit skills. The use of Excel at the intermediate level will be required to perform analytical review.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 351, QMB 210.

Corequisites

ACC 420.

ACC 420 Intermediate Accounting II

ACC 420 expands the student's study of generally accepted accounting principles. The course covers the theory and methodology involved in accounting for investments, current liabilities, long-term debt, leases, deferred income taxes, pensions, stockholders’ equity, earnings per share and accounting changes. The course also covers the preparation of the statement of cash flows and differences between US GAAP and IFRS.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225), ITM 220 and a grade of "C" or higher in ACC 320.

ACC 490 Accounting Internship

ACC 490 examines practical aspects of accounting through a paid accounting internship at a firm under supervision of faculty and firm representatives. This course may not be used to satisfy major requirements. It may be repeated for credit beyond 124 hours. Approval of the accounting department’s internship coordinator is required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with at least a 2.25 overall GPA; completion of four accounting classes at or above the 300 level with a 3.0 average in those classes.

ACC 495 Special Topics in Accounting

ACC 495 is offered at the discretion of the accounting department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ACC 499 Independent Study in Accounting

ACC 499 is a readings or independent studies course taken for variable credit. May not be used as an elective in the accounting major.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and associate dean.

ACC 500 Essentials of Financial Accounting

For graduate students only. This course examines the accounting principles and techniques involved in the creation and interpretation of external accounting financial statements.
 
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Admission to the MBA program.

Corequisites

ACC 501

ACC 501 Essentials of Managerial Accounting

For graduate students only. This course examines the accounting principles and techniques used by internal stakeholders to evaluate business performance and make short term decisions.

 
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Admission to the MBA program

Corequisites

ACC 500

ACC 502 Auditing II

For undergraduates and graduates. This course is the second auditing course, focused on Statements on Standards for Attestation Engagements (SSAEs), the Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services (SSARSs), and the US and International Codes of Professional Conduct. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 401

ACC 610 Accounting and Value Creation

For graduate students only. This course presents best practices and contemporary developments in Strategic Cost Management by focusing on how managers use cost information to create value and to align organizational functions and activities with strategic goals.
 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500, FIN 500.

ACC 625 Accounting Research and Analytics

For graduate students only. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills needed by ALL students entering the accounting profession (see AICPA Core Competency Framework). These skills include critical thinking and problem solving, decision modeling, research, communication and reporting, and leveraging technology.
Credit Hours: 4

ACC 635 Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

For graduate students only. ACC 635 exposes students to the background and nature of ethical decision-making from personal, professional and societal points of view. Students learn how to recognize ethical issues in business, to reason effectively using higher-order moral thinking skills, to identify the elements of good governance and to perform risk assessment from business and assurance perspectives. Topics include ethical decision-making, why ethical decision-making is important to professional careers in accounting, the role of an ethical culture in business within the context of corporate governance and how risk assessment aids professional accountants.

Credit Hours: 4

ACC 637 Information Systems Control and Audit

For graduate students only. This course provides students with a pragmatic study of information systems (IS) audit/control and its significance for contemporary accounting practice. The course is designed to give students a working understanding of IT governance, IS risk management, IS resource control, IS security management and IS audit processes, with emphasis on accounting compliance and assurance concerns. Prevailing and/or emerging issues relating to IS audit/control are also explored, with consideration for the evolving responsibilities of accounting professionals in an IT-based control environment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 351 or equivalent.

ACC 641 Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 631 introduces the underlying accounting concepts, methods of accounting and financial statement preparation for state and local governments and other not-for-profit organizations such as charities, universities and colleges, and health care organizations. Accounting standards and procedures for these types of organizations are significantly different from those of for-profit organizations, and this course provides the student with the ability to prepare, read, understand and analyze financial statements of not-for-profit entities.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320.

ACC 643 Advanced Financial Accounting

ACC 643 covers several complex topics including business combinations, consolidations, foreign currency transactions, translation of foreign currency financial statements, hedging and derivatives, and partnerships.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 320 and ACC 420.

ACC 650 Nonprofit Management: Financial Management

For graduate students only. ACC 650 develops financial and evaluation tools for nonprofit executives. It includes an overview of financial reporting guidelines and techniques; accounting methods, systems and special topics related to nonprofit organizations; cost behaviors, measurements and analysis; the budgeting process and preparation of budgets; use of financial statement analysis; and the roles of executive officers and directors in financial management and internal controls.

Credit Hours: 3

ACC 651 Advanced Management Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 651 provides students with a pragmatic study of advanced management accounting concepts and practices relating to strategic cost management, performance management, and management accounting control with emphasis on behavioral, social and sustainability implications.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 304 or equivalent and admission to the graduate program.

ACC 653 Federal Tax Accounting II

For graduate students only. ACC 653 examines laws, regulations and court opinions governing taxation of corporations, partnerships and estates. There is significant exposure to tax research tools. Students complete a volunteer tax clinic requiring some evening or weekend commitment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 352.

ACC 655 Fraud Examination

For graduate students only. ACC 655 applies fraud examination methodology to the three major types of occupational fraud: corruption, asset misappropriation and fraudulent financial statements. Fraud examination is a methodology for resolving allegations of fraud from inception to disposition. This methodology covers topics related to the prevention, detection and investigation of fraud.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500.

ACC 657 Financial Reporting and Analysis

For Graduate students only.  This is a practical analytical course that targets a diverse group of professional financial statement users such as auditors, equity analysts, accountants, creditors, and business consultants. The primary objective of this course is the mastery of interpreting and analyzing financial statements.  To achieve this objective the course provides a framework and a set of tools aimed at improving student’s ability to analyze companies and the business environment and how to perform comprehensive financial statement analysis as the foundation on which to evaluate performance and assessing future prospects.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC-320

ACC 660 International Accounting

For graduate students only. ACC 660 provides a pragmatic study on international accounting and reporting issues facing multinational corporations. Topics include worldwide accounting diversity, the international financial reporting standards (IFRS), foreign currency transactions and hedging exchange risks, translation of foreign currency financial statements and international transfer pricing.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 420.

ACC 680 Contemporary Issues in Accounting

This course focuses on evaluating current and emerging issues and topics relating to accounting constructs, policy issues and professional concerns using accounting theory. This integrative capstone experience requires students to apply skills and knowledge gained from prior coursework. Students will demonstrate their professional knowledge, professional competency and professional responsibility through cases, projects and oral presentations.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 625, ACC 635 and at least 24 total earned hours in the MSA program.

ACC 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Approval by the Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies, college internship coordinator and associate dean.

ACC 695 Special Topics in Accounting

A course offered at the discretion of the accounting department. Subjects may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ACC 699 Independent Study in Accounting

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in accounting.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA, ACC 610, FIN 611 and written permission of the department chair.

AFR 1101 Heritage and Values Part I (1)

This course introduces the Air and Space Forces, hopefully encouraging students to pursue an AF career or at least seek additional information to be better informed about the role of the USAF. The course allows students to examine general aspects of the Department of the Air Force, leadership fundamentals, service benefits, and opportunities for officers. The course also lays the foundation for becoming an Air or Space professional by outlining our heritage and values. As a foundational course, AS100 also provides a historical perspective such as lessons on war and US military, AF operations, principles of war, and airpower (see the complete lesson list below). This course provides students with a knowledge-level understanding for the employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. The students will be introduced to the military way of life and gain knowledge on what it means to be an Air or Space professional. A succinct perspective of the AS100 course objective is to sell the AF as a career and lay a strong foundation built on AF Core Values.
Credit Hours: 1

AFR 1120 Heritage and Values Part II (1)

This course introduces the Air and Space Forces, hopefully encouraging students to pursue an AF career or at least seek additional information to be better informed about the role of the USAF. The course allows students to examine general aspects of the Department of the Air Force, leadership fundamentals, service benefits, and opportunities for officers. The course also lays the foundation for becoming an Air or Space professional by outlining our heritage and values. As a foundational course, AS100 also provides a historical perspective such as lessons on war and US military, AF operations, principles of war, and airpower (see the complete lesson list below). This course provides students with a knowledge-level understanding for the employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. The students will be introduced to the military way of life and gain knowledge on what it means to be an Air or Space professional. A succinct perspective of the AS100 course objective is to sell the AF as a career and lay a strong foundation built on AF Core Values.

Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2001 Air Force Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory is required for each of the aerospace studies courses. It meets one hour and 45 minutes per week. Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized cadet corps with a progression of experiences designed to develop each student's leadership potential. Leadership Laboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies; drill and ceremonies; career opportunities in the Air Force; and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. Students develop their leadership potential in a practical laboratory, which typically includes field trips to Air Force installations.

Credit Hours: 0

AFR 2130 Team and Leadership Fundamentals Part I (1)

This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. It is imperative that cadets are taught from the beginning that there are many layers to leadership, including aspects that don’t always jump to mind. Such things include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower and problem solving efficiently. The students will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows AS200.
Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2140 Team and Leadership Fundamentals Part II (1)

This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. It is imperative that cadets are taught from the beginning that there are many layers to leadership, including aspects that don’t always jump to mind. Such things include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower and problem solving efficiently. The students will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows AS200.
Credit Hours: 1

AFR 2940 Basic Aerospace Internship

Internship credit is given to any student who successfully completes a two-week Field Training (FT) encampment. FT is a mandatory program for all individuals seeking an Air Force officer commission through AFROTC. The program is designed to develop military leadership and discipline, provide Air Force orientation and motivation, and determine potential for entry into the Professional Officer Course en route to a career as an Air Force officer. FT is conducted at Maxwell AFB, Montgomery, AL. FT attendance is selective based upon a national competitive boarding process and the needs of the Air Force — not all students are selected for FT. To successfully complete FT, the student must complete at least 70 percent of the required training according to the Field Training syllabus, and not be absent from the FT encampment for more than 72 consecutive hours. The student also must pass the physical fitness test, attain a minimum 70 percent academic average and not be rated as "unsatisfactory" in any single performance factor block (sub-area) or receive an overall score of "unsatisfactory" on the AFROTC Form 70, Field Training Performance Report.

Credit Hours: 3

AFR 3220 Leading People and Effective Communication Part I (3)

This course designed to build on the leadership fundamentals taught in AS200. The cadets will have the opportunity to utilize their skills as they begin more of a leadership role in the detachment. The goal is for cadets to have a more in-depth understanding of how to effectively lead people, and provide them with the tools to use throughout their detachment leadership roles. Secondly, cadets will hone their writing and briefing skills. Many of the cadets will be uncomfortable with public speaking, and this semester is designed to get them used to briefing. The second semester of AS300 is centered on leadership and ethics, and is mostly guided discussion. The goal here is to get cadets thinking about leadership through their own lens, and give them some tools to work on their leadership skills.
Credit Hours: 3

AFR 3231 Leading People and Effective Communication Part II (3)

This course designed to build on the leadership fundamentals taught in AS200. The cadets will have the opportunity to utilize their skills as they begin more of a leadership role in the detachment. The goal is for cadets to have a more in-depth understanding of how to effectively lead people, and provide them with the tools to use throughout their detachment leadership roles. Secondly, cadets will hone their writing and briefing skills. Many of the cadets will be uncomfortable with public speaking, and this semester is designed to get them used to briefing. The second semester of AS300 is centered on leadership and ethics, and is mostly guided discussion. The goal here is to get cadets thinking about leadership through their own lens, and give them some tools to work on their leadership skills.
Credit Hours: 3

AFR 4201 National Security, Leadership Responsibilities and Commissioning Preparation Part I (3)

The AS400 cadet should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. The student should know basic Department of the Air Force operations as well as understand selected roles of the military in society and current domestic and international issues affecting the military profession. Cadets should understand the responsibility, authority, and functions of a Department of the Air Force commander and selected provisions of the military justice system. The final portion of the AS400 course is designed to prepare cadets for life as a second lieutenant. This is a great time for instructors to include any information they feel would help their cadets as they transition from civilian life to military life.
Credit Hours: 3

AFR 4211 National Security, Leadership Responsibilities and Commissioning Preparation Part II (3)

The AS400 cadet should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. The student should know basic Department of the Air Force operations as well as understand selected roles of the military in society and current domestic and international issues affecting the military profession. Cadets should understand the responsibility, authority, and functions of a Department of the Air Force commander and selected provisions of the military justice system. The final portion of the AS400 course is designed to prepare cadets for life as a second lieutenant. This is a great time for instructors to include any information they feel would help their cadets as they transition from civilian life to military life.
Credit Hours: 3

ARA 101 Elementary Arabic I

Beginning Arabic with emphasis on the cultural context in which Arabic is used. Emphasis is on achieving a full mastery of Arabic sounds and the Arabic writing system, as well as basic proficiency in everyday conversational Arabic, including greetings and other common expressions.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. Students who have previously completed two or more years of Arabic may not enroll in ARA 101 for credit except by written permission of the instructor. Students cannot take ARA 101, 102, 201, and 202 concurrently.

ARA 102 Elementary Arabic II

Beginning Arabic with emphasis on the cultural context in which Arabic is used. Emphasis is on achieving a full mastery of Arabic sounds and the Arabic writing system, as well as basic proficiency in everyday conversational Arabic, including greetings and other common expressions.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 101 or equivalent skills. (Students who have previously completed two or more years of Arabic may not enroll in ARA 101 for credit except by written permission of the instructor.) Students cannot take ARA 101, 102, 201, and 202 concurrently.

ARA 201 Intermediate Arabic I

Develops a greater understanding of the Arabic language and the diversity of cultures in the Arabic-speaking world, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 102 or equivalent skills. Students cannot take ARA 101, 102, 201, and 202 concurrently.

ARA 202 Intermediate Arabic II

Develops a greater understanding of the Arabic language and the diversity of cultures in the Arabic-speaking world, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Arabic. ARA 102 or equivalent skills. Students cannot take ARA 101, 102, 201, and 202 concurrently.

ART 101 Form and Idea

A non-studio oriented course designed to increase an overall understanding of art. The course concentrates on the various social and historical factors that have affected art throughout time. Issues examined include why art is created; how it is used; how it affects us, collectively and individually; how it is formed; and the value it has for enriching our lives. May not be used to satisfy major or minor degree requirements in art.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

ART 102 Foundations: Drawing

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces traditional problems in drafting and pictorial organization. Involves development of pictorial form and space by line and value through a variety of media.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 103 Foundations: Materials & Methods

A studio / performance-oriented course that introduces materials and fabrication methods commonly used within a fine arts studio setting. Involves development of two and three-dimensional forms using a variety of media with the goal of familiarizing students with an array of artistic processes. A focus will be placed on safe and conscientious studio practices.

Credit Hours: 2
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 104 Foundations: 2-D Design

A studio/performance-oriented course covering the fundamental principles of visual organization. Emphasizes two-dimensional design and the use and theory of color.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 105 Foundations: 3-D Design

A studio/performance-oriented course introducing the fundamental concepts of the visual elements; mass, volume, space, texture, light, time, color organized employing the principles of unity and variety, rhythm, balance, relative dominance, scale and proportion. Emphasis will be placed on the development of personalized concepts that explore technical and aesthetics considerations utilizing effective techniques and workmanship.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 110 Foundations: Digital Arts

A studio/performance-oriented course introduces various electronic and digital tools for use in creating artistic projects.  Covers the history, evolution and theory of relevant technology and uses in the visual arts in order to provide context for the hardware and software used in the class.  InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop will be emphasized. Laboratory fee required

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 199 BFA Portfolio Development

A technical-based studio course designed to improve portfolio deficiencies in preparation for re-application for the BFA program and ART 299 Junior Portfolio Review. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Permission of Department Chair

ART 201 Introduction to Painting

A technical-based studio course that introduces students to various aspects of oil painting, both representational and abstract.  Emphasis is placed on color theory, perceptual training, and problem-solving.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 208 Darkroom Photography

A studio/performance-oriented course offering an introduction to Black & White photography. Emphasis will be focused on darkroom techniques and developing one's own photographic style with a fine art approach to photography.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 209 Figure Drawing

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces problems in pictorial organization using the human figure and other organic forms as reference.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 218 Digital Photography

This course gives students the necessary technical and aesthetic skills to make quality digital photographs while developing perception, creativity, visualization skills and a command of the medium including relevant software.  Students will become proficient in digital media while maintaining an appreciation of the medium as a fine art and as a means of personal expression.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 225 Methodology of Art Historical Research

In this course students will learn to navigate are scholarship and write research paper according to the academic standards in the field.  After an introduction to the vast array of art historical resources and their uses, we will explore advanced techniques for retrieving academic primary and secondary sources, both on-line and off-line.  The exercises will include iconographic, historical, or technical information.  Students should be prepared to read critically, participate in discussions, make class presentations, and engage in research for the written assignments. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

ART 230 Introduction to Art Therapy

This is an introduction to art therapy that includes a historical overview, an examination of professional standards of practice, educational requirements, ethics, research and assessment. Provides an overview of art therapy’s role in comparison to related professions and how art therapists can collaborate with related professionals. Students will explore the field of art therapy through a combination of scholarly discussion and direct engagement with art processes.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA)

ART 231 Relief Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on printmaking as an expressive medium through the exploration of form and pictorial organization in all relief printmaking techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 232 Intaglio Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course focusing on printmaking as an expressive medium through the exploration of form and pictorial organization in all intaglio printmaking techniques, including dry point and etching.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 233 Experimental Printmaking

A studio/performance course that will push the boundaries of traditional Printmaking processes and applications to create installation, objects and book-based works of art. Students will use sustainable, digital and hybrid approaches to explore new territory in contemporary print.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 234 Digital Printmaking

A studio/performance-oriented course that combines digital tools and traditional printmaking processes to create fine art prints, installation and books. Using tools such as Photoshop, scanners, large format printers, vinyl-cutters and 3-D printers, as well as traditional relief, intaglio and lithographic printmaking techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

ART 235 Screenprinting

A studio/performance-oriented course that combines hand-cut stencils, digital tools and photographic processes to create fine art prints, installation and books. Using tools such as Photoshop, scanners, large format printers, vinyl-cutters and primarily materials specific to creating hand printed screenprints.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

ART 240 Arts in Health

This course explores the relevance of visual art, writing, music, and dance in health and wellbeing. This course is for anyone wanting to explore the role of the creative arts in human development, medical settings, psychology, public health, in communities and as an agent for social change. Experimental components will offer students the opportunity to actively engage in the arts to deepen an understanding of the benefits in health and wellness. It will be of value to those considering working with others using creative arts in public health, healthcare, psychology, or dance, music and art therapies, as well as for those who may wish to establish the creative arts as a form of practice and discipline in their lives. Open to all students.
Credit Hours: 2
(A)(HFA)

ART 244 Introduction to Museum Studies

Introduction to Museum Studies is designed as an introductory, undergraduate level seminar with two major objectives. Through readings, seminar discussions, and on-site interviews with museum professionals, it will introduce students to contemporary discourse on museums and galleries, on topics such as their institutional roles, their social impact, and their responsibilities as public keepers of our cultural heritage. This course will also provide an overview of the skills, abilities, and qualities required by the different professional roles, which play a vital role in the management of any museum. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA)(W)

ART 245 Principles of Collection Management

Principles of Collection Management is designed to prepare students with knowledge and experience of the best practices of collection care and record management. In this course, we will cover the ethical obligations that guide collections duties and the associated care activities. These include cataloging, accessioning and deaccessioning, condition reporting, loans, art handling, storage, packing and shipping. Legal issues such as copyrights, repatriation, and provenance will be discussed. The emphasis of this course will be on practical skills, which we will apply in a set of hands-on projects related to the care and management of the University of Tampa Permanent Collection.

Credit Hours: 3
(HFA)

ART 251 Mixed-Media Painting I

An inquiry-based studio course that explores the interactions and combinations of painting with drawing, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and new technologies.  Emphasis is places on the synthesis of materials and processes, and on inventive ways to utilize new technologies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, ART 201, ART 209, ART 231

ART 252 Experimental Painting I

An inquiry-based studio course that questions the limits and boundaries of painting as a creative medium, stressing the investigation in both media and technique.  Experimentation with non-traditional materials and processes are emphasized, as well as original research in concept and media.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, ART 201, ART 209 ART 231.

ART 261 Sculpture Mold-Making and Casting I

A studio performance course.  This course introduces the aesthetic, technical, and historical aspects of the casting process as it relates to sculpture.  Students learn basics skills in methods of mold making to include plaster, vacuum form and flexible rubber molds.  Instruction in various methods of casting and materials used for casting will be explored to include plaster of Paris, cement, resin, plastics hot metals and experimental and new media.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA/ST) (A)

ART 262 Experimental Sculpture I

This course introduces the rich potential of a material, media, and technical engagement with sculptural work.  This course builds upon traditional sculpture practices while embracing new techniques and media.  Students will take traditional materials such as steel, plaster and wood combined with new or emerging technologies to create Sculpture. 

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (A)

ART 266 Museum Practicum I

This course prepares professionals with the knowledge and the manual skills to ensure that objects are safely handled throughout an installation. Playing a key role in collection management, preparators are responsible for framing and building displays, packing and unpacking art, as well as installing and de-installing exhibitions. This course introduces the physical skills, tools, and technical thinking behind safe installation of exhibitions.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ART 244, ART 245

ART 268 History Survey I

A critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts from the Prehistoric era to the Gothic period. Emphasis is given to the social and cultural influences that affected the development of art in Western civilizations. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

ART 269 History Survey II

A critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Emphasis is given to the social and cultural influences that affected the development of art in Western civilizations. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

ART 271 Pre-Columbian

A critical and analytical study of significant pre-Columbian works of art with reference to architecture, sculpture, painting and the minor arts. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

ART 281 History of Graphic Design

A critical and analytical survey of the evolution of modern graphic design and the contextual relationships between visual communication, typography, and illustration through the lens of social/technological development throughout history, from the 14th century to the present. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, or ART 110

ART 282 Survey of Non-Western Art

This course is a critical and analytical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts of the Far Eastern cultures of India, China, Japan and the end Near Eastern Islamic countries of Asia.  One of the main focuses will be on the encounters and reciprocal influences between the so-called Western and the non-Western arts.  Through a thorough examination of specific works of art and/or monuments form each of these traditions, emphasis will be placed on distinctive artistic styles, forms, and aesthetics of each region, and the links between cultures. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

ART 283 Design Thinking

This course is an introduction to and exploration of design thinking theories and methodologies. Design thinking is a problem-solving process of discovery and ideation that employs design based techniques to gain insight and yield innovative solutions to how designers think, empathize, and work collaboratively generating ideas and multiple solutions abundantly. Applicable to all students.

Credit Hours: 2

ART 292 Art and Design Immersion: Travel Course

Art Immersion is a unique travel course that combines art history, fine arts and design. The course will immerse students firsthand in a vibrant art scene. On location students visit the several art fairs, galleries, museums and the working studios of prominent artists or graphic design firms. In the seminar portion of the course, readings and discussion focus on artists/design firms and art movements from the early 20th century to the present. Possible destinations include New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami and Washington, D.C. May be repeated for credit. If taken twice, this course can fulfill a required art history course for the art and graphic design majors. A travel fee is required.

Credit Hours: 2
(HFA)

Prerequisites

permission of instructor.

ART 295 Design and New Media Travel Course

This travel course is open to all students interested in learning and exploring historical movements and current trends in design and new media. Focusing on experiential learning, students will visit cities, museums, institutions and events that are relevant to the fields of graphic and industrial design, typography, digital arts, interactive media, animation and new technologies. Possible destinations include Europe, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. This course may count as an art history requirement for Art and Design majors. Travel fee is required.

Credit Hours: 2-4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

ART 295A Design and New Media Travel Course

This travel course is open to all students interested in learning and exploring historical movements and current trends in design and new media. Focusing on experiential learning, students will visit cities, museums, institutions and events that are relevant to the fields of graphic and industrial design, typography, digital arts, interactive media, animation and new technologies. Possible destinations include Europe, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. This course may count as an art history requirement for Art and Design majors. Travel fee is required.
Credit Hours: 2
(A) (HFA) (IG)

ART 297 New Majors Seminar

A course designed to acquaint students with the unique policies and procedures in the department. Emphasis is placed on transfer course equivalencies; the application process for the BFA degrees, and the development of a Two-Year Plan.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

New Transfer Majors Only.

ART 298 Professional Seminar

This course is designed to introduce career preparation and professional development for visual artist/designers.  It presents a wide variety of professional skills: goal setting; professional ethics; documentation strategies; portfolio basics; networking and social media; and information regarding grants, residencies, internships, and graduate schools.  Emphasis is placed on development of the Junior Review Portfolio and mentoring on future degree paths and career aspirations.

Credit Hours: 2
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110 and one additional 200-level ART studio course. Co-requisite: ART 299

ART 299 Junior Portfolio Review

This is a zero-credit, required course for all B.A. and BFA majors within the Department of Art and Design. The portfolio is the most meaningful indicator to determine a student's future success. Portfolios are reviewed in one-on-one meetings with a minimum of two full-time faculty. The goal of these meetings is to assess the level of achievement regarding program competencies and evaluate the strengths and weakness of their portfolio.  It also provides to discussion regarding career interests and the best path for their future success: pursuing the professional BFA degree, or pairing the B.A. degree with a second major and/or minor.  The BFA is a highly selective, invitation-only degree program.


Credit Hours: 0

Corequisites

ART 298 Professional Seminar. This course may be repeated once; it is highly recommended to take ART 199 BFA Portfolio Development simultaneously.

ART 304 Experimental Drawing I

An inquiry-based studio course that utilizes experimental materials and technique to solve traditional problems in drafting and pictorial organization.  This includes the development and expansion of how we define the pictorial form and space by line and value through a variety of media contexts.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, ART 208, ART 218, ART 231, ART 232, ART 233, ART 251, ART 252

ART 305 Graphic Design I

An introductory study of the creative processes associated with the graphic design field.  Emphasis on the relationship between word, image and meaning, fundamental design principles and problem-solving processes as applied to visual communication.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 102, ART 104, and ART 110.

ART 308 Digital Photography II

A studio/performance-oriented course designed to increase students' technical knowledge and ability for individual expression.  Emphasis is on research with a fine art approach to image making to develop and refine one's own photographic style.  Both theoretical and conceptual issues surrounding digital photography in the contemporary art world will be addressed.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 218

ART 309 Typography

Introduction, exploration, and application of type and fundamental typographic principles.  Develop an understanding of typography as it relates to visual communication and graphic expression while exploring both traditional and nontraditional forms.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 104 and ART 110.

Corequisites

ART 305

ART 318 Graphic Design II

Continuation of ART 305- Graphic Design I.  Continued study in the fundamental principles and technique of graphic design and practice of the creative process as applied to visual problem solving.  Focus is on the development of formal design skills, ideas and the tools used to execute complex design solutions.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 305, ART 309

ART 319 Typography II

Continued exploration of visual structure and hierarchies of information through the organization of typographic space.  Emphasis is on the use of type to create message, both literary and visual.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 309

ART 320 Graphic Design Portfolio Studio

This course focuses on career preparation and professional development for graphic designer and related fields.  Topics include portfolio evaluation and preparation, written and oral communication, interview best practices and job searching skills.  Each student will create and organize a web-based portfolio and resume presentation.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST).

Prerequisites

ART 305

ART 322 Branding and Packaging Design

This course explores three-dimensional design as it applies to product containers. Branding, type, layout, design, and form are synthesized to create commercial packaging. Design solutions are developed from branding concept to three-dimensional package designs. Relationships between form and function, cost and creativity will be addressed to develop cost-effective packaging designs at a professional level. Lab fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 305 and ART 309

ART 323 Women in Art

This course focuses on women artists of the modern contemporary period, and begins with the study of works by women from the 16th to 19th centuries, to end with a survey of the most significant contemporary women artists' production. This course will consider how gender issues are encoded in images of women, as well as explore the socio-political context for the creation of art by women.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA)

Prerequisites

One of the following courses: ART 101, ART 268, ART 269, or ART 357

ART 324 Greco-Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance Art

This course combines aesthetic, historical, and thematic approaches to the study of significant works from the Greco-Roman, Medieval, and Italian Renaissance periods, including sculpture, painting, architecture, and other forms of artistic production.  Each period is addressed on its terms as well as in relation to what came before, as we explore complex modes of reception and transformation of artistic inspirations. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA) (W) (IG)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201

ART 325 Art Across 15th through 18th Century

This course combines aesthetic, historical, and thematic approaches to the study of significant works of Northern Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical art in Europe, including sculpture, painting, architecture, and other forms of artistic production.  Each movement is addressed on its terms as well as in relation to other styles as we explore complex modes of reception, inspiration, and reaction in the development and expression of artistic goals. This course entails a significant amount of reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201

ART 327 Studio Lighting I

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces students to controlled lighting techniques to develop an approach for manipulating light to create distinctive imagery.  Studio lighting techniques, color theory, digital editing and printing will be addressed.  Students will work towards a proficiency in utilizing light as photography's main tool for artistic expression and communication through constructed imagery.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 102, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, ART 200, ART 201, ART 208, ART 218, ART 231, ART 232, ART 251

ART 328 Experimental Photography I

A studio/performance-oriented course that introduces students to alternative photographic processes using various lens-based practices and equipment.  Students will experiment extensively with hybrid forms using analog and digital methods to combine old and new techniques in innovative ways.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 102, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, ART 201, ART 208, ART 218, ART 231, ART 232, ART 251

ART 329 Graphic Design III

Intermediate exploration of conceptualization and development of type-and-image messages.  A more in-depth exploration of conceptual thinking, typography and investigative tools used to solve communicative problems.  Focus is on deeper research and analysis of visual communication problems, and refinement of visual message construction.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 299 and ART 318

ART 330 Art Therapy with Children and Adolescents

Overview of art therapy as it applies to children and adolescents. Explores the development and psychology of art as indicators of a child’s experience. Students will learn to apply their foundational art therapy knowledge to work with a variety of child and adolescent populations.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, PSY 101, ART 230, ART 240, or Permission of the instructor.

ART 331 Art Therapy with Adults

Overview of art therapy as it applies to the complications of adult life experiences. Explores the intrinsic therapeutic value of adult art expressions and their ability to serve as a form of verbal communication. Students will learn to apply their foundational art therapy knowledge to work with a variety of adult client populations.

Credit Hours: 3
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, PSY 101, ART 230, ART 240, or Permission of the Instructor.

ART 333 Applications for Health and Wellness Professions

A studio/performance-oriented course that explores the therapeutic properties of art media and techniques through direct engagement. Processes will be assessed for their appropriateness with a variety of client populations and potential to assist in meeting specific treatment goals. Students will learn how to convey the richness of their own experience through art in order to more effectively and empathically elicit therapeutic art from clients.

Credit Hours: 3
(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ONE of the following: ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, PSY 101, ART 230, ART 240, or Permission of the Instructor.

ART 340 Research in Convergence and Technologies

Research in Convergence and Technologies (RCT) is a student-centered multidisciplinary arts course that combines creative, independent inquiry into artistic practices, design, and emerging technologies. RCT is a collaborative course that employs multiple content forms within the Fabrication Lab. Students will explore new possibilities for creative and scholarly expression with deep integrations of multidisciplinary concepts, techniques, and technologies. RCT focuses on multiple facets of designing and making as a means to create; students within this course may realize specific artworks, productions, or products. This course encourages divergent reasoning, problem-solving, and critical thinking within each student's unique research.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ART 110

ART 341 Relief Printmaking II

As a continuation of ART 231, Relief Printmaking II is a deeper investigation of the material and techniques of Relief Printmaking. This class is for students that would like to explore more advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of printed artworks.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 231

ART 342 Intaglio Printmaking II

As a continuation of ART 232 Intaglio Printmaking II is a deeper investigation of the material and techniques of intaglio printmaking. This class is for students that would like to explore more advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of printed artworks.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 232

ART 345 Museum Administration

This course will cover the operational aspects that relate specifically to museum staff/volunteer management, marketing, budget management, public relations/events management and planning, fundraising, program development and evaluation, building and facilities management, and board/donors/visitor relations.  This course does not satisfy Humanities/Fine Arts general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 244.

ART 349 Figure Drawing II

As a continuation of ART 209 Figure Drawing II is a deeper investigation of the materials and approaches of drawing the human figure. This class is for students that would like to explore more advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of figure drawings.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 209

ART 350 Figure Painting I

A technical-based studio course that explores descriptive painting revolving around the human form, spanning from hyper-realism to stylization. Emphasis is placed on light, space, color interaction, and paint application. Investigations in both perceptual and conceptual approaches to painting the figure are explored.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 102, ART 201, ART 209.

ART 351 Mixed Media Painting II

This course is a continuation of ART 251 Mixed Media Painting that emphasizes experimentation and exploration of mediums, digital processes, and new ways to intersect drawing, painting, photography, and sculpture.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 251

ART 352 Experimental Painting II

This course is a continuation of ART 252 Experimental Painting that questions the limits and boundaries of painting as a creative medium stressing investigation in media and technique. Non-traditional aspects of painting are explored and challenged in the context of a contemporary discourse.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 252

ART 355 Figure Painting II

This course is a continuation of ART 350 Figure Painting, which involves investigations of descriptive painting from the human form. Issues of light, space and color interaction are stressed. Students will study both from the old masters and contemporary paintings, as well as from the live model. Students will investigate both perceptual and conceptual approaches to painting the figure. The final goal is to have each student begin to realize their own style and channeling it towards successful figure painting.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST).

Prerequisites

ART 350

ART 357 Modern Art

This course is a critical and analytical study of late 19th and 20th century painting, sculpture, photography and architecture with an emphasis on the conditions and circumstances that fostered their development.  It surveys the major world art movements of this period, from Realism to Impressionism, Cubism, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Futurism, Pop Art and Op Art.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

Prerequisites AWR 101 and AWR 201

ART 361 Sculpture Mold-Making and Casting II

As a continuation of ART 261 Sculpture Mold-Making and Casting I, this course continues exploration in methods of mold making practices and new technology and media with an emphasis on advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of three-dimensional artworks.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 261

ART 362 Experimental Sculpture II

As a continuation of ART 262, this course continues exploration in traditional sculptural practices and new technology and media with an emphasis on advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of three-dimensional artworks.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 262

ART 365 Screenprinting II

As a continuation of ART 235, Screenprinting II is a deeper investigation of the material and techniques of Screenprinting. This class is for students that would like to explore more advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of printed artworks.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 235

ART 366 Museum Practicum II

This course will detail all the stages of the process of developing an exhibition—from initial concept through a finished, fully installed exhibition. This continually evolving field requires specific complex skills, entailing technical expertise in project management, staff and resource management, and the translation of the curators’ vision, graphically and physically, into a finished visitor-centered exhibition.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ART 266

ART 370 Printing, Publishing and Book Arts

This course is an introduction to the art and history of the book. It includes studio experience with letterpress printing, typography and typesetting, principles of editing and publishing, creative writing, graphic design, illustration, papermaking and bookbinding. The primary aims of the class are to introduce students to the aesthetic, cultural and material dimensions of the reading experience, to enhance their understanding of how physical and visual presentation shapes a reader’s perceptions, and to introduce the history, craft and art of the physical book. Equivalent to ENG 370.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

ART 371 Fabrication Design I

Fabrication Design is an introductory course that explores 2D design, 3D modeling, and 3D rendering workflows paired with rapid prototyping and fabrication methods using state-of-the-art CNC milling machines, 3D printers, and laser cutters. This course blends design technologies with material processing and manipulation central to a research-based design inquiry, meeting a growing demand in today's competitive professional and creative maker focused environment.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 110

ART 375 Digital Arts II

This is a dynamic studio and seminar forum that explores theoretical, social, technical, and contextual research and concerns within digital art practices. We will extend your knowledge from Digital Arts I and investigate methodologies and technologies from electronics, programming, and interactive design to installation through experimentation. This course is designed to give students an interdisciplinary approach to emerging technologies in the arts and design disciplines.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 110

ART 380 Special Topics

A course offered at the discretion of the Art department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, or topic that is of interest to a particular group of students. May be repeated for credit, if the topic is different.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

ART 401 Special Projects

Independent research or creative project under the guidance of a member of the Art faculty. Emphasis maybe in any of the disciplines with the department. May be repeated for credit. Requires the submission of a signed Independent Study form to register.
Credit Hours: 1-6
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Instructor and Chair signature.

ART 411 Internship

This studio/performance-oriented course involves placement in an advertising agency, magazine or related enterprise for hands-on work experience. May be repeated for additional credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Junior and senior art majors only, with consent of instructor.

ART 412 Art Therapy Practicum

This internship is designed to give students hands-on experience using art in a therapeutic capacity. Students may select from a number of agencies and work under the supervision of art therapists, artists in residence, art educators, child life specialists, activity therapists or counselors. May be repeated for credit. 

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

Prerequisites

Any two of the following courses: ART 230, ART 330, ART 331, ART 333. Juniors and seniors only, or permission of the instructor.

ART 413 Experimental Drawing II

An inquiry-based studio course that is a continuation of ART 304: Experimental Drawing I; continued development and ambition for a deeper engagement with course concepts is expected.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

ART 304

ART 423 Contemporary Art

This course explores art that has shaped the perception of contemporary art in a global world. We will examine the major themes of contemporary art focusing on a wide range of artworks that explore an even wider variety of materials, stylistic approaches, technologies, and theories; it will incorporate artists from all different parts of the world. This course requires a significant amount of writing, both formal and informal.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (W)

Prerequisites

Junior/Senior standing, or ART 101, or ART 357

ART 425 Art Theory and Criticism

This course will present different disciplinary perspectives and practices within art history. There will be an introduction to main types of methodologies adopted in scholarly writings in the arts, such as Marxism, Feminism, race and gender, psychoanalysis, post-colonial theory, and deconstruction. The focus will be on the historiography of the last two decades in art history and on selected contemporary debates. There will be regular writing instruction and exercises in the styles and methods presented during the course, geared to the production of a full-length academic paper.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

One of the following: ART 225, ART 244, ART 271, ART 323, ART 357 or ART 423

ART 427 Studio Lighting II

As a continuation of Art 327, this course is to develop ideas and approaches to generate an individual photography portfolio exploring various lighting techniques.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 327

ART 428 Experimental Photography II

As a continuation of Art 328, this course is for advanced exploration utilizing experimental photography techniques. Students refine skill sets and approaches for a unique photographic portfolio pursuing various experimental and alternative processes. Emphasis is on creation and presentation of a cohesive body of exhibition-quality work.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 328

ART 429 Graphic Design IV

Advanced problem solving in visual communication. Explore complex image-making and interactive components. Current topics in cultural issues impacting graphic communication are explored. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 329

ART 440 Practicum: Workshop

Students will participate in an intensive three-day workshop with an internationally renowned artist through our Visiting Artist Program. The practicum will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic knowledge, process and growth as they work and collaborate with these professionals. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Any 100/200-level studio art course and permission of the Department Chair.

ART 441 Practicum: Assistantship

Students will work with faculty on their professional research and scholarship in a capacity that involves hands-on experience in research, pre-production, production, and post-production aspects of being an art professional. The practicum will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's knowledge, process and growth as they work and collaborate with these professionals. May be repeated for credit.
Credit Hours: 2
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Permission of the Department Chair.

ART 442 Practicum: Meridian Scholar

Students will participate as an assistant during an intensive project with an internationally renowned artist through our Meridian Scholar 10-day residency program. The practicum will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic knowledge, process and growth as they work and collaborate with these professionals. May be repeated for credit.
Credit Hours: 2
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Any 100/200-level studio art course and permission of the Department Chair.

ART 445 Advanced Principles of Collection Management

This course will cover the advanced administrative responsibilities of collection management for museums and explore the ethical obligations that guide these collections duties and the associated care activities. The collection operations examined include: accession and de-accession, ownership and title, collection management policies and planning, risk assessment and mitigation and insurance, legal and ethical issues associated with copyright, repatriation, and provenance.  This course does not satisfy Humanities/Fine Arts general distribution requirements.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ART 245.

ART 450 Advanced Painting Studio

This studio/performance-oriented course explores issues concerning media and methods relevant to individually designated concepts in order to encourage students to develop their own vision and style. This course provides the time and focus to develop a significant and fully realized body of work while exploring the intellectual connections between work in the studio and readings, writings and discussions in contemporary art and culture. The objective is for students to develop, through research and practice, a personal vocabulary of imagery and ideas regarding painting. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Two of the following: ART 201, ART 251, ART 252, ART 350, ART 351.

ART 461 Sculpture Mold-Making and Casting III

As a continuation of ART 361, this course continues exploration in methods of mold making practices casting and new technology and media. Advanced students are expected to continue their exploration into the processes and techniques of sculpture and enhancing their and body of work.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 361

ART 462 Experimental Sculpture III

As a continuation ART 362, this course continues exploration in traditional sculptural practices and new technology and media with an emphasis on advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of three-dimensional artworks. The course will challenge students to set personal goals in terms of research and art production.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 362

ART 466 Museum Practicum III

This course is the Senior Capstone experience in which students concentrate their focus and attention on producing a cohesive exhibition. Students will learn the proper techniques and procedures for researching, presenting and mounting an exhibition. This course prepares students to the professional role of museum / gallery curator. It develops skills in connecting art, artists, and communities, and in engaging audiences effectively by developing relevant, timely, and accessible exhibitions.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ART 244 and ART 245 and one of the following: (ART 266 or ART 366)

ART 471 Fabrication Design II

Fabrication Design II is an advanced level course and a continuation of Art 371. In this course, emphasis is given to a deeper investigation of the materials and techniques in 2D, 3D modeling, and 3D rendering technologies, combined with rapid prototyping and fabrication methods that use state-of-the-art CNC-milling machines, 3D printers, and laser cutters. Students will explore and engage in more advanced techniques and processes in an effort to develop a body of work consistent with the growing demand in today's competitive professional and creative maker focused environment.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 371

ART 475 Digital Arts III

This is a dynamic studio and seminar forum that explores theoretical, social, technical, and contextual research and concerns within digital art practices. We will extend your knowledge from Digital Arts I and II by investigating various contemporary methodologies and technologies. Within this course, you will hone your body of work through conceptual development and critique. This course is designed to give students an interdisciplinary approach to emerging technologies in the arts and design disciplines.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 375

ART 490 Collaboration Studio

Collaboration Studio is a unique experience that emphasizes collaborative and team-based making strategies. Many artists find their voice through cooperation and productive group problem solving across disciplinary lines. Collaboration Studio seeks to foster a spirit of discovery and open exploration as students and faculty work together in a wide range of studio experiences and create a synergistic group dynamic that will inform and advance the work of all participants.  Collaboration Studio is not a traditional class; it is an experience. The project culminates in an Open House Exhibition. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, ART 105, ART 110, and ART 298

ART 497 Art Therapy Capstone

This course will introduce students to professional and ethical issues in Art Therapy and will consider their particular interest in the field, with a focus on preparation for application to graduate programs and/or creative arts employment opportunities. Students will develop a portfolio of work that best demonstrates the student's proficiency with a variety of art materials and that demonstrates adequate technical skills and perceptual development. Students will create a research poster for their final exhibition and a joint exhibition in the community at a field placement site with their fellow students with marginalized populations. Portfolio includes a case study review.
Credit Hours: 3
(A)(HFA)

Prerequisites

ART 412

ART 498 BFA Capstone and Exhibit

This course is the Senior Capstone experience in which students concentrate their focus and attention on producing a cohesive body of artwork specifically designed for inclusion in the Senior BFA Exhibition. This experience is offered in each studio area and counts toward the concentration. Students will learn the proper techniques and procedures for planning, presenting and mounting an organized body of work. Emphasis also is given to the development of an artist's statement and the proper techniques for photographic documentation. Students are encouraged to take an additional advanced level course in their area of concentration simultaneously.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 299 BFA Proficient "B" and permission of instructor

ART 499 BFA Graphic Design Capstone

Advanced problem solving in visual communication combining complex typography, image-making and integrated components. Topical issues impacting graphic communication will be researched and discussed.


Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

ART 299 BFA Proficient "B" and ART 329 and permission of the instructor.

ASK 099 Student Success Seminar

ASK 099 is open only to students who are recommended by the faculty Academic Appeals Committee. It is a semester-long course of seminars that meets one day a week. The lectures and activities presented are motivational and developmental. The topics include confidence, study approach, emotional well-being (coping with feelings of defeat, stress-management strategies), the importance of recognizing success, problem-solving, assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses, involvement in on-campus and community activities, setting realistic academic and life goals, health issues, taking responsibility for academic and career decisions, and dealing successfully with professors. University advising staff and guest speakers from several areas of the University facilitate the seminars.

Credit Hours: 0

ASK 100 Academic Skills

An individualized skill-building course in which students enhance their academic skills using their own textbooks; improve their time management and organizational skills; and work on test-taking competencies. A basic class for students who understand that they will need new and different study skills to be successful in the college environment.

Credit Hours: 1-2

ASK 205 Advanced Academic Skills

ASK 205 covers personal and academic skill sets taught at a higher level of rigor and intensity than ASK 100.  The objective for the course is to have students recognize the importance of their role in their own college success while providing them with appropriate tools to achieve success. A holistic approach to success puts the emphasis on the student, not the skill. Students will learn to accept personal responsibility, discover self-motivation and self-awareness, set realistic and obtainable goals, become a critical thinker, cultivate emotional intelligence and become a life-long learner.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

ASK 205 is linked with ASK 205L (summer I) and ASK 215L (each fall), which provides the student with specific counseling and one-on-one and/or group support meetings weekly.

ASK 205L Advanced Academic Skills Lab

Is linked to ASK 205, as a complimentary laboratory course that provides the student with specific counseling in one-on-one and/or group support meetings, along with assigned exercises, in order to further support the student in their goals.  The lab portion meets once a week for the duration of the semester.

Credit Hours: 1

ASK 215L Advanced Academic Skills Lab II

Compliments and serves as a follow-up to ASK 205/205L. The objective of ASK 215L is to assist the student in successfully transitioning to a "normal" academic environment through application of the skills learned in ASK 205/205L. The course closely parallels coaching now being done by Academic Excellence Programs through the Coaching for Student Success program (CSS). STEP UP students who have successfully completed the summer courses and register for fall classes will be registered in ASK 215L to facilitate working with a coach. The student’s coach, in consultation with the student, will develop a plan of action for the semester.

Credit Hours: 1

ASL 101 Basic American Sign Language I

Beginning American sign language with emphases on structure, basic vocabulary and an introduction to manual communication systems. Includes psychology, socioeconomics and philosophies of education of the deaf in the United States, as well as an explanation of the field of interpreting and historical notes on sign language worldwide. 

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Students cannot take ASL 101 or ASL 102 concurrently.

ASL 102 Basic American Sign Language II

Beginning American sign language with emphases on structure, basic vocabulary and an introduction to manual communication systems. Includes the psychology, socioeconomics and philosophies of education of the deaf in the United States, as well as an explanation of the field of interpreting and historical notes on sign languages worldwide.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ASL 101. Students cannot take ASL 101 or ASL 102 concurrently.

AST 126 Introduction to Astronomy

Designed for non-science majors. Topics include naked-eye observations, planetary motion, the solar system and the origin, structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Satisfies general distribution requirements. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

AST 150 Solar Eclipses Around the World

Solar eclipses occur roughly twice a year, but total solar eclipses occur much less frequently; and the totality of the eclipse is only visible from a narrow strip of the Earth's surface. This course will provide an introduction to astronomy in the context of these dramatic events, including travel to observe a total solar eclipse that is visible in that calendar year.
Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

AST 300 Astrophysics

This course is an introduction to the physics of astronomical phenomena, including celestial dynamics, the interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter, planets, stellar structure, stellar evolution, stellar remnants, galaxies, dark matter, cosmology and the history of the universe. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward the physics major and minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

PHY 307

AST 330 Astrobiology

Astrobiology is a cross-disciplinary study, bringing together biology, astronomy, oceanography, atmospheric science, chemistry, planetary science, and geology to study the origins of life in the universe. In this course we will examine the origins of life on Earth, the synthesis of organic molecules in space, the origin of solar systems and the possibility of life on other worlds. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward the physics major and minor. Lecture only.
Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS)

Prerequisites

MAT 260, PHY 201 or PHY 206

ATT 175 Athletic Training Practicum I

This course involves instruction and supervised practice of selected athletic training skills emphasizing taping and wrapping techniques. Completion of this course includes peer assessments, practical examinations and scheduled clinical observation requirements.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Pemission of Athletic Training Program Director.

ATT 250 Emergency Care in Athletic Training

The content and lab activities in this course prepare athletic training students to work collaboratively and use critical thinking to make appropriate decisions regarding the planning and care necessary in an emergency. Skills taught focus on advanced acute care procedures for people experiencing a medical emergency based on current evidence including: CPR and AED training, administering supplemental oxygen, prevention of infectious disease transmission, initial and secondary injury assessment including a relevant review of systems, wound closure, and patient transportation. Lab fees required.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 230 with a grade of BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 274 Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis I

Fundamental skills of athletic training examination and assessment, including examination approaches and techniques, assessment of status and documentation for individuals with sport-related injuries. Emphasis placed on musculoskeletal disorders. Case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 371 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 275 Athletic Training Practicum II

Involves supervised clinical practice with instruction of selected athletic training skills appropriate to the student’s level in the program for example: documentation, emergency procedures and assessments, and technical application of selected therapeutic interventions and protective taping and wrapping. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical education experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the professional athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 276 Athletic Training Practicum III

Involves supervised clinical education with instruction of selected athletic training skills appropriate to the student’s level in the program for example: subjective and objective patient examination, diagnostic testing, and clinical documentation. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical education experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the professional athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ATT 275 with a BC or better and ESC 371 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 370 Medical and Surgical Issues in Athletic Training

Seminar-style class with physicians and other health care specialists emphasizing the recognition and evaluation of injuries and illnesses, and the medical intervention and rehabilitation methods used for these problems.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 371, HSC 100, HSC 230, HSC 250 with a C or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 373 Therapeutic Interventions I

Studies the scientific foundations and practice-based implementation of various therapeutic interventions in athletic training. Provides knowledge necessary to make clinical decisions as to which therapeutic interventions will be most effective in a rehabilitative intervention program. Clinical case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 371, HSC 231. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 374 Therapeutic Interventions II

A continuation of Therapeutic Interventions I. Studies the scientific foundations and practice-based implementation of various therapeutic interventions in athletic training. Provides knowledge necessary to make clinical decisions as to which therapeutic interventions will be most effective in a rehabilitative intervention program. Clinical case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 340, ATT 373. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 375 Athletic Training Practicum IV

Involves supervised clinical education with instruction of selected athletic training skills appropriate to the student’s level in the program for example: subjective and objective patient examination, diagnostic testing, and clinical documentation. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical education experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the professional athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ATT 274 with a BC or better and ATT 276 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 376 Athletic Training Practicum V

Involves supervised clinical education with instruction of selected athletic training skills appropriate to the student’s level in the program for example: subjective and objective general medical examination, laboratory and diagnostic testing, and clinical documentation. Completion of this course includes practical examinations and clinical education experience requirements. Students must be admitted into the professional athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ATT 373 with a BC or better, ATT 375 with a BC or better and ATT 377 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 377 Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis II

A continuation of Assessment of Musculoskeletal Injuries I. Fundamental skills of athletic training examination and assessment, including examination approaches and techniques, assessment of status and documentation for individuals with sport-related injuries. Emphasis placed on musculoskeletal disorders. Case studies are used to facilitate learning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 371 with a BC or better and ATT 274 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 475 Supervised Clinical Education Athletic Training I

Involves supervised clinical education experiences involving directed and self-directed clinical education experiences at the University and off-campus clinical sites. Provides an opportunity for development of critical thinking skills to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skills in clinical practice and the care of patients. Successful course completion includes board examination preparation, clinical synthesis seminar, clinical in-services, practical examinations, clinical performance assessments, and clinical education experiences.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ATT 374 with a BC or better and ATT 376 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 476 Supervised Clinical Education Athletic Training II

Involves supervised clinical education experiences involving directed and self-directed clinical education experiences at the University and off-campus clinical sites. Provides an opportunity for development of critical thinking skills to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skills in clinical practice and the care of patients. Successful course completion includes board examination preparation, clinical synthesis seminar, clinical in-services, practical examinations, clinical performance assessments, and clinical education experiences.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

ATT 475 with a BC or better and ATT 495 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

ATT 485 Undergraduate Research in Athletic Training

This course is an experiential education course that focuses on conducting undergraduate research in athletic training and working along with a faculty member.  The students will be engaged in project conception, background literature study, methodology, data collection, analyzing results and possible presentation of research to the larger community. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor

ATT 495 Health Care Administration and Quality Improvement in Athletic Training

This course focuses on fundamental principles of administration and evaluation of the delivery of athletic training services in the context of the larger health care system. Strategies to achieve the best patient outcomes by collecting, analyzing, and effecting change using qualitative and quantitative information will be emphasized. Case studies are used to facilitate learning. Students must be admitted into the professional athletic training program to be eligible to enroll in this course.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ATT 374 with a BC or better and ATT 376 with a BC or better. Admission to the Athletic Training Professional Program and Permission of Program Director.

AWR 100 Fundamentals of Academic Writing

This course is designed to provide writing and reading support for students while they complete their AWR 101 requirement at UT. Course assignments parallel the AWR 101 assignment sequence, and reinforce the fundamental skills that are necessary for success in AWR 101. This course may not be taken by students who have already received credit for AWR 101, but may be repeated for credit with permission from instructor.

Credit Hours: 2

AWR 101 Writing and Inquiry

Writing and Inquiry invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts. During the writing process, students will consider their own and others' perspectives on a variety of vital personal, historical, philosophical, and social issues. Taking their own experiences and their peers' perspectives as credible sources of knowledge, students will expand their inquiries beyond the personal into complex discussions in academic, literary and public textual forms. Students will also practice appropriate use and critique of technology, using digital sources as support for their arguments and grounds for further inquiry. Students must complete AWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better to register for AWR 201.

Credit Hours: 4

AWR 110 Academic Writing for Multilingual Students I

This course is designed to develop and improve writing skills for students for whom English is a second language. Students may be required to take AWR 110 before enrolling in AWR 101 (see statement on placement testing in English in the Academic Programs section of the catalog). The professor also may recommend that a student take AWR 111 before enrolling in AWR 101. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to register for AWR 101. This course may not be used to fulfill the general distribution requirement.

Credit Hours: 4

AWR 111 Academic Writing for Multilingual Students II

A course designed to provide writing and language support for multilingual students while they complete their AWR 101 requirement at UT. It takes an intercultural rhetoric approach that parallels the AWR 101 assignment sequence, and encourages students to draw on their own linguistic and cultural backgrounds to help make sense of English academic writing conventions. This course may not be taken by students who have already received credit for AWR 101, but may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

Credit Hours: 2

AWR 201 Writing and Research

AWR 201: Writing and Research teaches the conventions and expectations of academic research writing by guiding students through their own extended research project. The course teaches project discovery; annotation of source materials; processes of drafting and revision; delivery of a polished final product that adheres to the standards of citation style; and finally, conversion of the essay into clear oral presentation for an audience of peers. AWR 201 may not count for the English or writing major or minor.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 (with a grade of "C" or better).

BAC 100 Baccalaureate Digital Skills

BAC 100 (Baccalaureate Digital Skills) is an on-line class for incoming students.  The course covers basic digital proficiency in Microsoft Office programs – Word, Excel and PowerPoint.  These skills are needed for future course work.  It is offered during two seven-week sessions each fall and spring semester and once during the summer.  Graded on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 0

BAC 101 First-Year Seminar I

First-Year Seminar I is a required course for all incoming first-year students. Students learn about Spartan Ready® skills designed to make them feel confident and prepared for a successful transition to college life. This course recognizes the importance of out-of-class experiences, and experiential learning in order to build relationships, and connect students to the UT community. Grades in the first-year seminar courses are awarded under the A-F graded system.

Credit Hours: 1

BAC 102 First-Year Seminar II

First-Year Seminar II is a required course for all second-semester first-year students. Building on the skills learned in BAC 101, this course emphasizes major and career research and exploration, and general preparation for life after college. Grades in the first-year seminar courses are awarded under the A-F graded system.

Credit Hours: 1

BAC 103 Transfer Students Seminar

Transfer Students Seminar is an elective course for all first-semester transfer students regardless of age or previous college-level coursework. Building on the Spartan Ready® Skills, the fundamental goal of this course is to help transfer students (1) make a successful transition from another institution of higher learning to UT, (2) make the transition more meaningful and successful and (3) integrate the student into the UT community of learners. Grades in this seminar course are awarded under the A-F graded system.

Credit Hours: 1

BAC 104 Military Veterans Seminar

Military Veterans Seminar is a required course for all first-semester undergraduate military veterans regardless of age or previous college-level coursework. The fundamental goal of this course is to help make the transition from being a military veteran to college student more meaningful and successful, as well as to integrate students into the UT community. Students learn Spartan Ready® skills for successful transition to college life at UT, including course planning and student organization involvement, as well as career and major decision-making. Grades in this seminar course are awarded under the A-F graded system.

Credit Hours: 1

BAC 105 Spartans Abroad Seminar

This course substitutes the required BAC 101/102 or HON 101/102 sequence for first-year students in the Spartans Abroad program only. Students learn the necessary skills for college transition, time management, and critical thinking. This course also prepares students for a semester abroad introducing them to the culture and customs of the host country. Grades in this seminar are awarded under the A-F grading system.

Credit Hours: 1

BAC 200 Peer Leadership

This course is designed for students interested in obtaining peer leadership roles and is open to any student with an interest in leadership. Over the course of the semester, Spartan Ready® components will be infused with peer leadership. Students will also learn how to build their professional brand as leaders on campus. This course fulfills an elective credit toward the leadership minor. This course is graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U). 

Credit Hours: 0-2

BAC 490 Applied Learning Experience

The University of Tampa Applied Learning Experience internship program pairs multidisciplinary teams of UT students with local companies to solve real-world problems. Local organizations provide problems or projects that can benefit from a multidisciplinary, inquiry-based approach. Teams of three to four students from different academic majors then collaborate to produce a deliverable for the organization within a 14-week timeframe and students benefit from supervision by a faculty committee composed of members with subject-are expertise. Can be taken for 1 - 4 credit hours depending on the project.
Credit Hours: 1-4

BIO 124 Biological Science

This course is a survey of topics in biological sciences for students not majoring in biological or chemical sciences. It is structured in a lecture/discussion format to allow flexibility in pursuit of contemporary topics in biology. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

BIO 135 Biodiversity Conservation

Explores topics such as the value of biological diversity, threats to biodiversity, strategies employed to protect endangered species and habitats, and sustainable development. How the process of science is applied to the conservation of endangered species and habitats is the central theme of the course. Case studies focus on regions of the planet that have been designated as biodiversity hotspots. Satisfies a portion of the natural science component of the baccalaureate experience requirements but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NS)

BIO 183 Microbiology for the Allied Health Sciences

Focuses on diseases and the organisms that cause them. These include bacteria, viruses, fungi, rickettsia and disease-causing protozoan. Additionally, the course focuses on infectious disease caused by medical and surgical practices and accidental injuries. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

BIO 198 General Biology I

A study of biology, emphasizing cell structure, cell reproduction, cellular and organismal metabolism, cell signaling, immunology, endocrinology and mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with BIO 198L and with a grade of “C” or better in both to count toward biology lower-core requirements and to enroll in BIO 199 (General Biology II) and BIO 199L (General Biology II Lab).

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L

Corequisites

BIO 198L

BIO 198L General Biology I Laboratory

A study of biology, emphasizing cell structure, cell reproduction, cellular and organismal metabolism, cell signaling, immunology, endocrinology and mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with BIO 198 (requires a grade of “C” or better in both) to enroll in BIO 199 (General Biology II) and BIO 199L (General Biology II Lab) and to count toward biology lower-core requirements.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L

Corequisites

BIO 198

BIO 199 General Biology II

Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course, as these represent the mechanisms through which biological and physiological diversity arises. Must be completed with BIO 199L and with a grade of “C” or better in both to count toward biology lower-core requirements.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

BIO 198 and BIO 198L must be completed with a grade of "C" or better in order to enroll in BIO 199 and BIO 199L.

Corequisites

BIO 199L

BIO 199L General Biology II Laboratory

Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course, as these represent the mechanisms through which biological and physiological diversity arises. Must be completed with BIO 199 (requires a grade of “C” or better in both) to count toward biology lower-core requirements.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

BIO 198 and BIO 198L must each be completed with a grade of "C" or better in order to enroll in BIO 199 and BIO 199L.

Corequisites

BIO 199

BIO 200 Genetics

A detailed survey of Mendelian, molecular and evolutionary genetics. Topics covered include mechanisms and patterns of inheritance, recombination, linkage, mapping, gene expression and regulation, mutation, DNA damage and repair, DNA technologies, population and quantitative genetics.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 200L

BIO 200L Genetics Laboratory

A detailed survey of Mendelian, molecular and evolutionary genetics. Topics covered include mechanisms and patterns of inheritance, recombination, linkage, mapping, gene expression and regulation, mutation, DNA damage and repair, DNA technologies, population and quantitative genetics.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 200

BIO 205 Tropical Biology and Conservation

This course is intended for students interested in the natural history, biology and ecology of the tropics, the most biologically diverse region of the world. Students will study evolutionary, ecological and other biological principles of tropical ecosystems and the natural history of the organisms that live there. We will examine conservation programs, sustainable development practices and the widespread impact of this region of the globe. The course culminates in a two-week travel experience where students will visit such places as lowland tropical rain forests, high elevation tropical cloud forests, coastal ecosystems, primary and secondary forests and more. In the field, students will conduct brief research programs designed to illustrate the possibilities of careers working in the tropics over a broad range of biological specialties, ranging from tropical biodiversity, evolution and sustainability to agriculture and medicine.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and permission of the instructor

BIO 212 Ecology

Examines relationships between species and their environment. Students explore the contributions of abiotic and biotic factors to limitations in numbers and distributions of organisms. A strong emphasis is placed upon classical ecological issues such as production dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and competition and life history strategies in marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 212L

BIO 212L Ecology Laboratory

Examines relationships between species and their environment. Students explore the contributions of abiotic and biotic factors to limitations in numbers and distributions of organisms. A strong emphasis is placed upon classical ecological issues such as production dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and competition and life history strategies in marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 212

BIO 224 Invertebrate Zoology

A study of the structure, physiology, life histories and group relationships of invertebrate animals.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 224L

BIO 224L Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory

A study of the structure, physiology, life histories and group relationships of invertebrate animals.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 224

BIO 225 Vertebrate Zoology

A study of the structure, ecology, behavior and taxonomy of the major vertebrate classes.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 225L

BIO 225L Vertebrate Zoology Laboratory

A study of the structure, ecology, behavior and taxonomy of the major vertebrate classes.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 225

BIO 227 Ecological Physiology

A study of the physiological basis of organismal adaptation to diverse habitats. Covers the environmental parameters impacting animal metabolism and plant productivity with a focus on the major stressors (e.g., water availability, heat, salinity, food supply, oxygen, radiation) in the habitats of each. Major topics include the adaptive and acclimative mechanisms in animals and plants with regard to osmoregulation, excretion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, neuromuscular systems and photosynthesis. The emphasis of the laboratory is on research exploring the adaptive and acclimative strategies employed by organisms under stress and the development of scientific communication skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 227L

BIO 227L Ecological Physiology Laboratory

A study of the physiological basis of organismal adaptation to diverse habitats. Covers the environmental parameters impacting animal metabolism and plant productivity with a focus on the major stressors (e.g., water availability, heat, salinity, food supply, oxygen, radiation) in the habitats of each. Major topics include the adaptive and acclimative mechanisms in animals and plants with regard to osmoregulation, excretion, metabolism, respiration, circulation, neuromuscular systems and photosynthesis. The emphasis of the laboratory is on research exploring the adaptive and acclimative strategies employed by organisms under stress and the development of scientific communication skills. 

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 227

BIO 228 Biology of Plants

Studies the morphology, anatomy and physiology of vascular plants, with emphasis on plants and their role in human society. Additional emphases are placed upon plants' reproduction, response to environmental change, ethnobotany, medicinal botany and the development and uses of plants in ancient and modern human societies.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 228L

BIO 228L Biology of Plants Laboratory

Studies the morphology, anatomy and physiology of vascular plants, with emphasis on plants and their role in human society. Additional emphases are placed upon plants’ reproduction, response to environmental change, ethnobotany, medicinal botany and the development and uses of plants in ancient and modern human societies.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 228

BIO 230 Experimental Design and Biostatistics

Investigates the use of statistical methodology to evaluate biological hypotheses. Topics include basic experimental design, descriptive statistics, and scientific inference and hypothesis testing using statistical tests such as analysis of variance, correlation, regression, contingency tables and nonparametric equivalents. Example data sets drawn from ecology, general biology and biomedical sciences are used to explore concepts. Class time is broken into lecture and laboratory components.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 250 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Examines vertebrate evolution through a detailed study of the systems of the vertebrates.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 250L

BIO 250L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

Examines vertebrate evolution through a detailed study of the systems of the vertebrates.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 250

BIO 301 Stem Cell Biology

This course will provide basic and advanced understanding of various stem cells (embryonic, induced pluripotent, adult), nuclear reprogramming (epigenetic, viral, non-viral, mRNA and protein based), potential diseases (neurological, autoimmune, metabolic, genetic, cardiac) treated by stem cells, translational medicine (from lab to bedside), drug discovery, and molecular pathways involved in the development and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP).

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200

Corequisites

BIO 350L

BIO 301L Stem Cell Biology Laboratory

This course will provide basic and advanced understanding of various stem cells (embryonic, induced pluripotent, adult), nuclear reprogramming (epigenetic, viral, non-viral, mRNA and protein based), potential diseases (neurological, autoimmune, metabolic, genetic, cardiac) treated by stem cells, translational medicine (from lab to bedside), drug discovery, and molecular pathways involved in the development and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200

Corequisites

BIO 301

BIO 302 Clinical Anatomy

This course examines the relationship between anatomy and the clinical reasoning skills used in medical diagnostics. The course relies on anatomical knowledge gleaned from dissections of model organisms as well as human prosections. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates with intentions of pursuing a career in the health professions.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 250

Corequisites

BIO 302L

BIO 302L Clinical Anatomy Laboratory

This course examines the relationship between anatomy and the clinical reasoning skills used in medical diagnostics. The course relies on anatomical knowledge gleaned from dissections of model organisms as well as human prosections. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates with intentions of pursuing a career in the health professions.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 250

Corequisites

BIO 302

BIO 307 Microbiology

A study of the structure, function and taxonomy of microorganisms, and their interactions with humans and their environment.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 307L

BIO 307L Microbiology Laboratory

A study of the structure, function and taxonomy of microorganisms, and their interactions with humans and their environment.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 307

BIO 310 Developmental Biology

A study of the developmental process in animals with emphases on cellular mechanisms, controlling development and morphology of embryos.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum; BIO 200; BIO 250 recommended.

Corequisites

BIO 310L

BIO 310L Developmental Biology Laboratory

A study of the developmental process in animals with emphases on cellular mechanisms, controlling development and morphology of embryos.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum; BIO 200; BIO 250 recommended

Corequisites

BIO 310

BIO 315 Virology

This course will introduce concepts in modern virology, with an emphasis on virus genetics, replication strategies, host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prevention and control of virus infections.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 315L

BIO 315L Virology Laboratory

This course will focus on laboratory techniques and methodology used in modern virology, with an emphasis on virus isolation, characterization and cellular interactions.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 315

BIO 317 Parasitology

A study of the major groups of parasites, emphasizing those affecting humans and domesticated animals. Examines the morphology, life history, ecology and pathogenicity of each parasite.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 317L

BIO 317L Parasitology Laboratory

A study of the major groups of parasites, emphasizing those affecting humans and domesticated animals. Examines the morphology, life history, ecology and pathogenicity of each parasite.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 317

BIO 330 General Physiology

A study of the major physiological systems of animals from a comparative perspective. Covers functional anatomy, homeostasis, evolutionary relationships, neurophysiology, dynamics of muscle contraction, endocrinology, cardiovascular physiology and environmental physiology.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 330L

BIO 330L General Physiology Laboratory

A study of the major physiological systems of animals from a comparative perspective. Covers functional anatomy, homeostasis, evolutionary relationships, neurophysiology, dynamics of muscle contraction, endocrinology, cardiovascular physiology and environmental physiology.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 330

BIO 340 Ichthyology

Examines the relationship between the unifying biological principles of evolutionary adaptation and the diversity of form and function found among fishes. The course considers the physical and biological selective pressures this group of vertebrates has faced during its evolutionary history and the morphological, physiological, developmental and behavioral adaptations that have arisen in response to these ecological factors. How fishes function in marine and freshwater ecosystems and the management actions being taken to conserve them as natural resources are examined.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 225 or 250.

Corequisites

BIO 340L

BIO 340L Ichthyology Laboratory

Examines the relationship between the unifying biological principles of evolutionary adaptation and the diversity of form and function found among fishes. The course considers the physical and biological selective pressures this group of vertebrates has faced during its evolutionary history and the morphological, physiological, developmental and behavioral adaptations that have arisen in response to these ecological factors. How fishes function in marine and freshwater ecosystems and the management actions being taken to conserve them as natural resources are examined.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 225 or BIO 250

Corequisites

BIO 340

BIO 345 Field Ornithology Lecture

Field Ornithology is an excursion-based, experiential learning opportunity with the goal of teaching students about birds and their habitats. Bird identification, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and biogeography are introduced in the classroom, and reinforced in the field. Course lectures are supplemented by weekly field trips to various locations in and around the Tampa Bay area where students encounter wild birds in their habitats.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum: At least one category II or category III course, or Ecophysiology (BIO 227), or Conservation, Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics (BIO 355) recommended

Corequisites

BIO 345L

BIO 345L Field Ornithology Laboratory

Field Ornithology is an excursion-based, experiential learning opportunity with the goal of teaching students about birds and their habitats. Bird identification, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and biogeography are introduced in the classroom, and reinforced in the field. Course lectures are supplemented by weekly field trips to various locations in and around the Tampa Bay area where students encounter wild birds in their habitats.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum: At least one category II or category III course, or Ecophysiology (BIO 227), or Conservation, Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics (BIO 355) recommended.

Corequisites

BIO 345L

BIO 346 Conservation Biology

A study of the biological and human factors relating to the current global extinction crisis and how conservation practices are used to evaluate and preserve threatened species and habitats. Emphases are placed upon how issues in ecology, population, biology and taxonomy affect the status of a species, and how these issues relate to policy and management decisions. Materials covered are connected to current literature in weekly discussion periods.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 346L

BIO 346L Conservation Biology Discussion

A study of the biological and human factors relating to the current global extinction crisis and how conservation practices are used to evaluate and preserve threatened species and habitats. Emphases are placed upon how issues in ecology, population, biology and taxonomy affect the status of a species, and how these issues relate to policy and management decisions. Materials covered are connected to current literature in weekly discussion periods. This course may be used as an elective for biology and marine science-biology majors, and is a required course for a major and minor in environmental science.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 346

BIO 350 Cell Biology

A study of general cellular organization, the physico-chemical aspects of living systems, cell energetics, cell membrane systems, signal transduction and second messenger systems, membrane phenomenon and cell cycle.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200

Corequisites

BIO 350L

BIO 350L Cell Biology Laboratory

A study of general cellular organization, the physico-chemical aspects of living systems, cell energetics, cell membrane systems, signal transduction and second messenger systems, membrane phenomenon and cell cycle.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200

Corequisites

BIO 350

BIO 355 Conservation, Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics

Uses an inquiry-based approach to explore how genetic data are used to answer research questions in conservation, evolution and ecology. The course focuses on the main approaches and limitations to selecting genetic markers, collecting and analyzing genetic data, that are used in current research. For example, we will cover genealogical data (e.g., DNA sequence), codominant allele data (e.g., microsatellite), expression data (e.g., cDNA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Topics will be broached as hypothetical research questions are brought to the class by students.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200.

Corequisites

BIO 355L

BIO 355L Conservation, Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics Laboratory

The laboratory includes hands-on wet lab data collection, data analysis and discussion of current research.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and BIO 200.

Corequisites

BIO 355

BIO 360 Immunology

A study of the fundamental concepts of immunology, including the essentials of immunological expression, cellular and humoral immunity, immunity and disease, auto-immunity, and developmental and comparative immunology, focusing on landmark experiments that underlie its theoretical framework.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232; BIO 307 is recommended.

Corequisites

BIO 360L

BIO 360L Immunology Laboratory

A study of the fundamental concepts of immunology, including the essentials of immunological expression, cellular and humoral immunity, immunity and disease, auto-immunity, and developmental and comparative immunology, focusing on landmark experiments that underlie its theoretical framework.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and CHE 232; BIO 307 is recommended

Corequisites

BIO 360

BIO 370 Molecular Biology

Provides a background in molecular biology with a focus on the regulation of gene expression and the experimental approaches used to study this regulation. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation and the mechanisms that regulate these processes. Cancer genetics and mammalian coat color genetics also are discussed as models for gene regulation. The laboratory portion of the course provides experiential learning of some of the laboratory techniques discussed in lecture. Topics covered in the laboratory include DNA extraction, PCR cloning of a gene, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing and analysis using bioinformatics.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 370L

BIO 370L Molecular Biology Laboratory

Provides a background in molecular biology with a focus on the regulation of gene expression and the experimental approaches used to study this regulation. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation and the mechanisms that regulate these processes. Cancer genetics and mammalian coat color genetics also are discussed as models for gene regulation. The laboratory portion of the course provides experiential learning of some of the laboratory techniques discussed in lecture. Topics covered in the laboratory include DNA extraction, PCR cloning of a gene, gene expression analysis, DNA sequencing and analysis using bioinformatics.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 370

BIO 380 Behavioral Biology

Course focuses on historical knowledge and recent advances concerning the evolution and adaptive significance of behavior from a comparative point of view. Topics include the genetic basis of behavior, the nervous system and integration of behavior, and social behavior, including mating and reproduction, predator-prey relationships and the biological bases of aggression, territoriality and communication.  Students will develop their communication skills as part of the writing-intensive requirement, learning about discipline-specific writing and research processes that engage course topics through formal and informal writing assignments, with opportunities for in-class discussion of the material, through student-led formal discussions and professor-led informal discussions.
Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category III, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum or equivalent

Corequisites

BIO 380L

BIO 380L Behavioral Biology Discussion

Companion course to BIO 380 explores course concepts in more detail. Laboratory exercises will investigate research methods in behavior, behavioral genetics, sensory systems and communication, animal motivation and personalities, optimal foraging, habitat preference, reproduction and mating systems, and parental care, using a range of live animal, video recordings, and simulations. In addition, scientific writing will be investigated through the preparation of a grant on a behavioral topic of the students choice. One weekend field trip to Lowry Park Zoo is required.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum or equivalent

Corequisites

BIO 380

BIO 390 Essentials of Electron Microscopy

Introduces the techniques used in preparation and viewing of biological specimens on the scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and consent of instructor.

Corequisites

BIO 390L

BIO 390L Essentials of Electron Laboratory

Introduces the techniques used in preparation and viewing of biological specimens on the scanning and transmission electron microscopes.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and consent of instructor

Corequisites

BIO 390

BIO 395 Disease Ecology

Course focuses on disease dynamics and host-pathogen interactions in complex natural environments. We will investigate the ecological phenomena that drive the transmission of pathogens among hosts, the impact of disease on host populations, and investigate what impacts the emergence of an infectious disease. We will explore wildlife and human diseases (e.g. White nose syndrome, influenza, malaria, Ebola, HIV, Chytridiomycosis). A discussion section will present the historical and current primary literature allowing us to explore disease epidemics more in-depth. Students will develop critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills through discussion and student-led presentation-based learning.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 400 Evolution

A study of the scientific foundations of evolutionary theory and the mechanisms responsible for evolutionary change. Topics covered include a historical perspective of evolution, origin of life, natural selection and adaptation, levels of selection, fitness concepts, speciation, Darwinian evolution and punctuated equilibria, extinction, the fossil record, life history evolution and human evolution. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

BIO 401 On the Origin of Species

This course highlights the historic and modern relationships between the study of biology and the shaping of evolutionary theory. Students learn about Charles Darwin and his contemporaries as well as modern research on evolution and zoology with particular emphasis on zoology, paleontology, and related fields as they develop and persist in British culture. The course co-requisite (BIO 401A Darwin's London) requires travel to London and surrounding areas, allowing greater depth of study on topics ranging from natural selection and evolution to paleontology, the history of the biological sciences, and the vertebrate diversity of England.
Credit Hours: 2-4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, any Biology Category II or Category III course, and Permission of Instructor.

Corequisites

BIO 401A

BIO 401A Darwin’s London

This short-term study abroad course is the companion to BIO 401 Origin of Species and requires travel to London and surrounding areas. The study abroad component of the course highlights the historic and modern relationships between the study of biology and the shaping of evolutionary theory and incorporates visits to historically important research facilities that inspired Charles Darwin and continue to inspire scientists today.
Credit Hours: 2-4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, any Biology Category II or Category III course, and Permission of Instructor.

Corequisites

BIO 401

BIO 405 Human Evolution

A study of the evolution of humans, beginning with the origin of primates. Course includes emphases on evolutionary phenomena, morphological and molecular evolution, extinct and modern human diversity, primate behavior, and human functional anatomy and paleontology.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NS) (Category II, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum: BIO 225, BIO 250 or BIO 400 recommended

Corequisites

BIO 405L

BIO 405L Human Evolution Laboratory

A study of the evolution of humans, beginning with the origin of primates. Course includes emphases on evolutionary phenomena, morphological and molecular evolution, extinct and modern human diversity, primate behavior and human functional anatomy and paleontology.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum; BIO 225, BIO 250, or BIO 400 recommended.

Corequisites

BIO 405

BIO 407 Fermentation Microbiology

This course focuses on applications of microbial metabolism in food production. Topics will include types and sources of microorganisms in food fermentations, metabolic activities of microorganisms and their influence on product characteristics, microbial interactions, processing of fermented foods, industrial applications of microbiology, and problems that may arise during fermentation. Focus will be on the microbiology in production of cheese, beer, wine, yogurt, bread, chocolate, coffee, and sausage.
Credit Hours: 3
(NS) (Category II).

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, BIO 307 , and permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

BIO 407A

BIO 407A Fermented Foods: From Art to Science

This short-term study abroad course is the companion to BIO 407: Fermentation Microbiology and requires travel to France and Belgium. The study abroad component of the course highlights the history of fermented foods as well as the modern industrial application of microbiology to food production.
Credit Hours: 1
(NS) (Category II).

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, BIO 307, and permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

BIO 407

BIO 408 Bioinformatics and Genomics

This course introduces fundamental concepts, algorithms and methods in bioinformatics and genomics. Topics include, but are not limited to: pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, biological database searching, phylogenetic analysis, protein structure prediction, genome annotation and comparative genomics. The course introduces the use of computer programming and various computational tools to analyze biological data. Understanding of bioinformatics methods and the practical application of these methods are emphasized. No prior programming experience is necessary.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I, PP)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and one of the following: BIO 200, BIO 370, or CHE 320

Corequisites

BIO 408L

BIO 408L Bioinformatics and Genomics Laboratory

This course introduces fundamental concepts, algorithms and methods in bioinformatics and genomics.  Topics include, but are not limited to: pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, biological database searching, phylogenetic analysis, protein structure prediction, genome annotation and comparative genomics. The course introduces the use of computer programming and various computational tools to analyze biological data. Understanding of bioinformatics methods and the practical application of these methods are emphasized. No prior programming experience is necessary.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and one of the following: BIO 200, BIO 370 or CHE 320

Corequisites

BIO 408

BIO 409 Programming for Biology

This course will introduce the Python and R programming languages with respect to biological sequence analysis. The BioPython module in Python and the Bioconductor package in R will be used to introduce programming concepts, with emphasis on analyzing big genomic data produced by high throughput sequencing technologies. Development of computational pipelines will be performed and various free bioinformatics software tools will be integrated with Python and R to analyze biological sequence data. No prior programming experience is necessary.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and one of the following: BIO 200, BIO 370, BIO 230 or BIO 408, or permission of instructor.

BIO 410 Senior Seminar

An in-depth study of a current topic in biology. Requires independent study project and presentation.

Credit Hours: 1
(NS)

Prerequisites

Senior standing in biology or marine science.

BIO 411 Biology Outcomes Capstone

This course consists of a capstone exam and a senior skills and attitudes survey, both of which are required of all departmental majors in their final 14-week semester. The capstone exam provides a framework for students to synthesize their comprehension of cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, organismal biology, population biology, evolution and ecology and gauges the preparedness of students to address scientific problems at a wide range of levels of biological organization. The final comprehensive exam serves as an overview of the areas of applied knowledge that are infused in the biology departments major programs. The skills and attitudes survey provides a framework for students to reflect on and provide an indirect measure of their understanding of the process and methodology of science as well as student preparedness to make informed decisions about complex scientific issues. Graded: S/U.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Senior standing in all majors offered through the Department of Biology. Must be taken during graduation semester.

BIO 420 Recent Discoveries in Biology

This advanced biology course will focus on analysis and presentation of published research articles. Students will also attend and critique biology research seminars. Themes ranging from molecular to organismal biology will be explored. This course will be of particular interest to advanced Biology students who plan to pursue graduate or professional degrees.

Credit Hours: 1
(NS)

Prerequisites

Students must have completed the Biology lower-core and either General Genetics or Molecular Genetics and have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and have senior status or permission of instructor.

BIO 440 Selected Topics in Biology

Students select a topic of interest in biology and explore the subject thoroughly through directed literature-based research. Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted and a formal paper with extensive literature review. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6
(W)

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair permission

BIO 445 Biological Research

Research questions must be selected with the professor in charge of the project with approval from the department chair. Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6
(NS)

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair consent

BIO 450 Biological Research - Capstone

Research topics must be selected in consultation with the professor in charge of the project with approval from the department chair. Usually requires preliminary library or laboratory research prior to attempting a BIO 450 project (volunteer research, BIO 440 or BIO 445 recommended). Requires at least two hours each week for each credit attempted, a research paper and oral presentation of topic. Oral presentation of results can be used in place of BIO 410 with permission of department chair. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 2-6
(W) (NS)

Prerequisites

At least 16 credit hours in biology, and faculty and department chair permission

BIO 480 Biology Laboratory Practicum

Through direct involvement both in and out of the classroom students gain practical knowledge of instruction in a college biology laboratory. Under the supervision of faculty, students are involved in the aspects pertaining to teaching a semester's biology laboratory. This may include but is not limited to presenting introductory material, aiding students during laboratories, development and critique of evaluation component(s), and laboratory preparation and maintenance. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1
(NS)

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

BIO 490 Biological Internship

Provides practical experience in science-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and firm representatives. Can be accomplished on a part-time or full-time basis. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

BIO 198 and BIO 199, 56 credit hours, minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major or approval of the department. Note: Prerequisite courses may be specified by the employer.

BIO 495 Special Topics

A lecture or laboratory course offered at the discretion of the Department of Biology. Subject may focus on a current issue in biology, training in a specific research technique or an area of biology that is of interest to a particular group of students. Counts as general elective credit only and therefore may not be used as an upper level biology elective.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

BIT 275 Information Technology Business Concepts

This course discusses the need of the organization to understand business challenges and utilize emerging technologies in order to contribute to the decision-making process. Students learn how to deliver value and manage business capabilities through incorporating IT solutions. An emphasis is placed on discussing the role of a "hybrid business manager," implementing appropriate business-driven technologies and managing IT organizational projects. This course includes concepts and issues critical in the globalization of business operations and information technology.  

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220

BIT 345 Web and Mobile Technology Applications

This course provides the foundation for understanding the design and implementation of web and mobile technologies with a specific emphasis on their application for businesses. The course focuses on the design, creation, and administration of user-centric mobile and web applications using contemporary tools. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BIT 275

BIT 365 Business Database Technology

This course introduces students to the database concepts with emphasis on the relational database model and structured query language (SQL) to extract information from the database. The course also introduces data management topics relevant to a business professional such as data analytics, web database development, database security and emerging approaches in database management. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze business requirement and recommend, implement and administer a database using a contemporary database management software.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BIT 275

BIT 475 Technology Solutions for Business

This course introduces several technology solutions to support business strategies and objectives that enable businesses to succeed in a competitive global business environment. An emphasis is placed on the discussion of cloud and technology solutions to support business decision making processes, supply chain systems, customer relationship management, monitoring and evaluation systems, and integration of an organization through enterprise resource planning.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BIT 345, BIT 365

BUS 101 Introduction to Global Business

This course emphasizes global competitiveness by introducing students to the way companies operate and how they compete with other companies. In addition, students learn about the importance of leadership, ethical behavior and corporate responsibility in becoming successful and sustaining that success. The course examines each of the functional areas in businesses and how they work together to produce the goods and provide the services that customers demand.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite or co-requisite of AWR 101 or equivalent. Co-requisite BAC 100. Available to declared COB majors, business minors, marketing minors, biology-business majors, liberal studies majors, AD/PR majors or by permission of COB associate dean during the fall and spring semesters. Open to all during the summer.

Corequisites

AWR 101 and BAC 100.

BUS 101L Introduction to Global Business - Common

Credit Hours: 0

BUS 221 Business Law and Social Responsibility

Study of the legal, moral and ethical structures in business. Topics include contracts, legal framework, constitutional law, business crimes, business torts, business entities and enterprise responsibilities to society.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 101.

BUS 550 Commercial Law for Financial Professionals

Study of legal issues involving accounting and financial professionals. Topics addressed include uniform commercial code sales, secured transactions, negotiable instruments and banking, along with creditor's rights, agency, enterprise organizations, securities, professional licensing/regulation and the legal liability of accountants.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 221

BUS 689 International Residency

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop personal familiarity with the global business environment. By combining academic lectures in various functional areas of business and visits with local companies and governmental representatives, students are able to gain in-depth understanding of the local business environment and how it is influenced by economic, legal/political, and sociocultural factors.
Credit Hours: 4

BUS 697 Career and Leadership Development

This course sets the stage for students' professional and career development throughout their years at UT and beyond through a highly intensive, personal approach that entails not only classroom sessions but one-on-one coaching and mentoring. Students will focus specifically on the creation of a strategic career management plan and development of leadership knowledge and skills.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MGT 598

BUS 698 Professional Development Practicum

For graduate students only. BUS 698 allows students to design a set of educational experiences to best meet the students learning needs and career aspirations. In order to fulfill the course requirements, each student selects from a well-defined list of activities covering a spectrum of business experiences including leadership certification, research projects, service learning projects, career development seminars, SAP certification workshops, travel study courses and internships.


Credit Hours: 2-4

CAR 201 Career Decision Making

For second-semester freshmen and sophomores, incoming transfer students (freshman or sophomore status) and sophomores who have not yet declared a major or who are uncertain about their previously declared major. Students gain an understanding of the process of career decision-making. They explore interests, skills, values and personality and learn how they relate to major and career choices.

Credit Hours: 1

CAR 401 Job Search Strategies

Covers current trends of job searching. Resume development, interviewing techniques, proper correspondence, resumes for the Internet, and job searching through various media are addressed through professional lectures, research methods, guest lecturers and class assignments. Seven week course.
Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing

CHE 126 Chemistry and Society

Designed for non-science majors. Introduces the basic concepts of chemistry and examines them in terms of real-world examples. Satisfies general distribution requirements. Requires proficiency in mathematics skills developed in MAT 150. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

CHE 128 Introductory Chemistry

This course deals with the fundamental principles of chemical science and basic calculations in science. Topics include scientific measurement, states of matter, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, chemical equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This course is intended for science majors as preparation for taking CHE 150/152/153L. Satisfies general curriculum distribution requirements. Lecture only. For CNHS majors only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

CHE 150 Chemistry for Health Care Professions

Investigates the fundamental principles of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include chemical bonding, nomenclature, gases, states of matter, solutions, acid and base theory, equilibrium and oxidation-reduction, organic functional groups, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent

CHE 152 General Chemistry I

Expands on the basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include chemical nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships, the chemistry of gases, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular geometry.  Permission to retake the course during the fall or spring semester after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course can only be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent. Students failing to meet the MAT 160 prerequisite are strongly recommended to take CHE 128 concurrently with MAT 160. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 153L (with a grade of "C" or better). High school or college preparatory chemistry strongly recommended.

CHE 153L General Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 152.  Permission to retake the course during the fall or spring semester after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course can only be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 152 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 154 General Chemistry II

A continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics include solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 152 and CHE 153L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisites: CHE 155L (with a grade of "C" or better) and MAT 170.

CHE 155L General Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 154.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

CHE 152 and CHE 153L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 154 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 165 Chemistry and Art

A science course designed to teach concepts of chemistry using works of art as the context. The course may include the study of materials used in creation of objects of art, art preservation, art restoration, forgery detection and nondestructive testing. The course will also explore the effect of environmental pollution, primarily air, on the stability and longevity of objects of art. The influence of materials on aesthetics will also be included. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 2-4
(A) (NS)

CHE 165A Chemistry and Art: Travel

Required travel portion for CHE 165. As they travel through the country of Italy, students will be able to experience works of art while making important connections to chemistry concepts discussed in lecture. These topics include: glass and tile mosaics; paintings on canvas and wood; frescos; marble and metal sculptures; protection, restoration, and preservation of art; and the chemistry of color and pigments.
Credit Hours: 2
(A) (NS)

CHE 180 Environmental Chemistry

Provides an introduction to the chemistry of the processes involved in air, water and soil pollution, and covers techniques and methods used by state and federal regulatory agencies. Does not apply toward a major or a minor in chemistry. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better)

CHE 232 Organic Chemistry I

A study of the chemical properties and reactions of carbon and its derivatives. Topics include bonding, nomenclature, stereo chemistry, substitution, elimination and free radical reactions, organometallic compounds, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the chemistry of alkyl halides, alcohols, epoxides, glycols, alkenes and alkynes.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 233L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 233L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Experiments focus on organic techniques used in the purification of liquids and solids and in structural elucidation. Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic organic laboratory skills, including communication of the results of scientific work. Over the course of the academic term, between nine and twelve experiments are conducted and students are required to keep a detailed laboratory notebook and submit discipline-specific formal laboratory reports on selected experiments. To effectively emulate the experience of professional science communication, training in report writing as well as peer review and iterative revision are incorporated in the report assignments.

Credit Hours: 1
(W)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 232 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 234 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include the chemistry of benzene, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, polycyclic and heterocyclic compounds, condensation reactions and special topics such as carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins or pericyclic reactions.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 232 and CHE 233L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 235L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 235L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Experiments involve organic synthesis and physical methods in organic chemistry including IR and NMR spectroscopy. Emphasis is on the acquisition of advancing organic laboratory skills, including communication of the results of scientific work. Over the course of the academic term, between nine and twelve experiments are conducted and students are required to keep a detailed laboratory notebook and submit discipline-specific formal laboratory reports on selected experiments. To effectively emulate the experience of professional science communication, training in report writing as well as peer review and iterative revision are incorporated in the report assignments.

Credit Hours: 1
(W)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 234 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 242 Medicinal Chemistry I

This course offers an introduction of the chemical and biological properties and reactions of medicinal compounds and their metabolites. Topics include: the chemistry of bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, geometry and pharmacology. Students will be given the opportunity to present on disease-related topics and their respective treatments.
Credit Hours: 1
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 232

CHE 244 Medicinal Chemistry II

This course offers an introduction of the synthesis, chemical and biological properties and reactions of medicinal compounds and their metabolites. Topics include: the chemistry of bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, geometry and pharmacology. Students will be given the opportunity to present on disease-related topics and their respective treatments.

Credit Hours: 1
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 232 and CHE 233L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 234.

CHE 245 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

An introduction to the basic principles of bonding with an introduction to molecular orbital theory. An extensive survey of the periodic properties of the elements supplemented with representative reactions for the main group elements. Additional topics include acid and base theory and crystal field theory for the first row transition elements. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Concurrent: CHE 245L

CHE 245L Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 245.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 245

CHE 305 Applied Physical Chemistry

An introduction to principles and applications of physical chemistry. Topics include states and properties of matter, thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems, phase and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

MAT 260 (with a grade of "C" or better) and either PHY 200 or PHY 205. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 310 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 310 Analytical Chemistry

An advanced treatment of chemical equilibrium and its application to the quantitative analysis of materials. Emphasizes gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods of analysis. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Concurrent: CHE 310L

CHE 310L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 310.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 310

CHE 315 Chemical Oceanography

The ocean is the largest aqueous mixture on the planet, and this course is an introduction to the chemistry of the seas. Chemical oceanography is one of the four major fields of oceanography and requires an interdisciplinary approach to understand the biological, chemical, geological and  physical processes that affect seawater constituents. The composition of seawater and its spatial and temporal variations will be the primary focus of the course. Interactions at the boundaries of the ocean with the atmosphere, sediments and seafloor that affect seawater chemistry will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

BIO 198, BIO 198L, CHE 234, CHE 235L, MAR 200, and MAT 260 (each with a grade of “C” or better).

CHE 320 Biochemistry

A study of the chemical properties and biological functions of the atoms, molecules, macromolecules and macromolecular complexes that contribute to living systems. Topics include pH; structure and function of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; and the major metabolic cycles and their cellular control processes. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 320L Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory course is designed to supplement lecture material discussed in CHE 320 (Biochemistry). Topics to be discussed and experiments performed by students include buffer composition and analysis; protein purification and quantitation; enzyme kinetics and inhibition; nucleic acid purification and quantification; and ligand binding and equilibrium analysis.
CHE 320L is only required for Biochemistry and Forensic Science majors. Other students enrolled in or who have previously completed CHE 320 (lecture) with a grade of at least a C may register for the lab, but it is not required.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 320 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 325 Biochemistry of Metabolism

This course extends the basic biochemistry (CHE 320) curriculum and provides a more comprehensive foundation. Topics covered in the lecture component include: glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen and fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids, nucleotide biosynthesis, biosynthesis of lipids, metabolism integration, metabolism of nucleic acids, and biochemical regulation of gene expression.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 320 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 331 Forensic DNA Analysis

A hands-on training experience in modern methods for obtaining and interpreting DNA profiles in forensic applications. All aspects of the process are taught, including: sampling extraction, quantification, amplification, and acquisition of a DNA profile. The interpretation of results, including multiple-source mixed DNA samples, will be discussed. Students operate instrumentation relevant to modern forensic laboratories, including extraction robots, quantification instruments, thermal cyclers, and genetic analyzers. This course is conducted in collaboration with the National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC) in Largo, FL. Periodic travel to the NFSTC facility is required.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

BIO 200

CHE 352 Physical Chemistry I

Topics include gases and kinetic molecular theory, the laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibrium, ideal and non-ideal solutions, electrochemistry and surface phenomena. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 310 (with a grade of "C" or better), MAT 261 (with a grade of "C" or better), and PHY 206.

CHE 353L Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to advanced chemical laboratory techniques.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 352

CHE 354 Physical Chemistry II

A continuation of Physical Chemistry I. Topics include kinetics, photochemistry, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 352 and CHE 353L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 355L Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

Continuation of physical chemistry laboratory.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 354.

CHE 360 Chemical Inquiry

This course is designed for students to explore research in chemistry, biochemistry, forensic science or marine chemistry. Specifically this course is for students who are not yet eligible to take 400 level research courses and for students of any year whose major is outside the department. Students choose a project requiring experimental or computational research in consultation with a faculty member. An electronic or written record of the student's progress must be submitted to the faculty mentor who may set additional requirements. This class may be repeated for a total of 8 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Credit Hours: 1-8
(NS)

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor is required.

CHE 370 Chemistry or Forensic Science Internship (Lower-Level)

Provides practical experience in chemistry-related programs in an organization under the supervision of faculty and external representatives. May be taken by students who do not satisfy the prerequisites for CHE 453 Chemistry Internship or CHE 463 Forensic Science Internship or by students engaged in experiences that relate to scientific activities but that do not directly build scientific knowledge. May be accomplished on a part-time basis and may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

consent of instructor and approval of department chair is required.

CHE 410 Senior Seminar

An in-depth, independent, literature-based study of a current topic in chemistry or biochemistry. A written report and an oral presentation of the topic must be presented to and reviewed by the chemistry faculty. 

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L, CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better) and at least one of the following (with a grade of "C" or better): CHE 245, CHE 320, or (CHE 352 and CHE 353L).

CHE 420 Advanced Biochemistry

Advanced Biochemistry CHE420 is a writing-intensive, laboratory-based course that expands on the basics introduced in Biochemistry CHE 320 and Biochemistry Laboratory CHE 320L. This course emphasizes both biochemical theory and methodology, including enzymology, purification and characterization of biological molecules, immunobiochemistry and the structure/function relationship of biological molecules. Students perform a semester-long laboratory project, culminating in formal laboratory report. Students are also assessed through scientific presentation, in-class examinations and take-home examinations designed to measure students’ mastering of the concepts presented during the lecture and laboratory portions of the course.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 320 and CHE 320L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 425 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Studies atomic and molecular structure, types of chemical bonding, periodic relationships, typical reactions of inorganic substances, and the modern experimental methods used in inorganic chemistry. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 245, CHE 310 (both with a grade of "C" or better), MAT 261, and PHY 206.

CHE 426 Advanced Organic Chemistry

This course is designed to cover many of the topics discussed in Organic Chemistry I and II in more depth. Topics may include the general study of organic reaction mechanisms including Eyring plots, Hammond's postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle, isotope effects and acid-base catalysis; conformational control; stereoelectronics; Hückel molecular orbital theory; pericyclic reactions; aromaticity; free-radical species and reactions; nucleophilic substitutions; eliminations; additions; multi-step synthetic strategies; retrosynthetic strategies; and natural product synthesis. In addition, the student may be expected to develop literature research skills by preparing and presenting a project involving the total synthesis of a naturally occurring compound or a topic of current interest. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 430 Advanced Instrumental Chemistry

Studies the theory and practice of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Methodology includes spectrophotometric, chromatographic, electroanalytical and nuclear techniques. Additionally, students are required to retrieve scientific information from primary, secondary and tertiary literature sources. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L, CHE 245 and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better).

Corequisites

Concurrent: CHE 430L

CHE 430L Advanced Instrumental Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHE 430.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Concurrent: CHE 430

CHE 432 Forensic Chemistry

This course provides a comprehensive overview of chemical methods and techniques commonly used in the analysis of forensic evidence. Topics include 1) drugs of abuse, explosives, and ignitable liquids, 2) sample preparation and extractions, 3) separations theory, 4) gas chromatography, 5) high performance liquid chromatography, 6) absorbance methods and color tests, and 7) mass spectrometry. The course is focused on forensic analytical methods, with particular emphasis on analysis of drugs of abuse, as well as interpretation of data. Lecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 310, CHE 234 and CHE 235L (all with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite: CHE 433L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 433L Forensic Chemistry Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 432.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 432 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 434 Forensic Toxicology

Focuses on the application of methods discussed in Forensic Chemistry to biological samples such as blood, urine, ocular fluid and tissue samples, to identify and quantitate drugs and toxins. Topics covered include 1) immunoassay, 2) forensic toxicology analyses of urine, blood, and alternative matrices, 3) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, 3) blood-alcohol analyses, and 4) subdisciplines and related topics such as postmortem forensic toxicology, human performance forensic toxicology, forensic urine drug testing, and performance-enhancing drug testing. Lecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 432 and CHE 433L (both with a grade of "C" or better). Pre- or corequisite:CHE 435L (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 435L Forensic Toxicology Laboratory

Laboratory experiments supplement lecture material presented in CHE 434.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: CHE 434 (with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 440 Professional Practice in Forensic Science

This course is designed to help students transition the knowledge and skills gained in their laboratory and coursework into employment in working forensic laboratories. The following topics, in the context of forensic science, are covered: quality assurance, courtroom testimony, ethics, data integrity, and employment practices.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 432 and CHE 433L (both with a grade of “C” or better), senior standing or permission of the instructor.

CHE 445 Advanced Organic Spectroscopy

Covers current spectroscopic methods for organic structure determination. Topics include mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and other techniques and their use in organic structure determination. Students are expected to develop literature research skills by preparing and presenting a project involving the determination of the molecular structure of a naturally occurring compound. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 234 and CHE 235L (both with a grade of "C" or better).

CHE 451 Capstone Chemical Research

Qualified students choose a project in consultation with a chemistry faculty member. Requires laboratory or computational research. The project should be performed during the student’s junior and/or senior years. This capstone research experience may be repeated for up to a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-2

Prerequisites

consent of instructor.

CHE 453 Chemistry Internship

Provides practical experience in chemistry-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and firm representatives. May be accomplished on a part-time basis and may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better), and at least one of the following (with a grade of "C" or better): CHE 245, CHE 305, CHE 320 or CHE 352 and CHE 353L. Must have 56 credit hours earned, minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major or approval of department chairperson.

CHE 454 Capstone Chemical Communication

Students completing several degrees in the department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Physics (including those certified by the ACS) are required to successfully complete CHE 454. This is the final step of the research experience, in which students immerse themselves in the effective communication of the results of their work. Students will be required to compose a peer-reviewed journal style manuscript communicating their findings and present their work in a public symposium.
Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

completion of at least two hours of CHE 451.

CHE 460 Introduction to Forensic Research

Qualified students in junior year choose project subject in consultation with chemistry faculty member. Requires laboratory research related to forensic science.  A written report and an oral presentation of the research must be presented to and reviewed by the chemistry faculty. The project should be performed during the student’s last three semesters. This capstone experience may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(NS)

Prerequisites

CHE 230, CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better)

CHE 463 Forensic Science Internship

Provides practical experience in forensic science-related programs in a firm or agency under the supervision of faculty and agency representatives. Students must apply for this internship at least one semester in advance. May be accomplished on a part-time basis and may be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

CHE 230, CHE 234, CHE 235L and CHE 310 (all with a grade of "C" or better), 56 credit hours earned, minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major, or approval of department chair

CHE 470 Tissue Culture

This course is an introduction to biochemical principles of and techniques utilized in the science of cultivating, manipulating and assaying animal cells in vitro. This course provides the basic science knowledge and laboratory skills required for carrying out diverse research projects in biomedical science, clinical research and biotechnology. This laboratory-intensive course provides extensive hands-on experience in animal cell propagation, sub-culturing, transfection with transgenes, clonal cell isolation, cryopreservation, inducible transgene expression, and a variety of biochemical assays. Lecture and laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CHE 320 and CHE 320L (both with a grade of "C" or better) and BIO 198

CHE 490 Molecular Basis of Cancer

Molecular Basis of Cancer (MBoC) is a laboratory-intensive course that provides extensive hands-on experience in chemically treating human cancer cell lines and performing a variety of biochemical assays and molecular analysis techniques of the biological molecules isolated from these cells. MBoC is intended to serve as an undergraduate classroom research experience (CURE). This CURE course includes lectures on the molecular techniques utilized and background on molecular oncology topics including oncogenes, signal transduction, DNA replication and repair, cell growth metabolism, apoptosis, as well as cancer of breast, colon, lung and prostate organ sites.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CHE 320 and CHE 320L (each with a grade of “C” or better); CHE 470 is also preferred.

CHE 498 Special Topics in Forensic Science

A lecture course in an applied forensic science discipline offered at the discretion of the forensic science faculty. Subject may be chosen from across forensic science but will typically involve forensic DNA analysis or forensic microscopy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

consent of instructor.

CHE 499 Special Topics in Chemistry

A lecture and/or laboratory course offered at the discretion of the chemistry faculty. Subject may be chosen from theoretical and/or practical applications in biochemistry, analytical, inorganic, physical or organic chemistry.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(NS)

Prerequisites

consent of instructor

CHI 101 Elementary Chinese I

CHI 101 (or equivalent skills) is a beginning Chinese language course with an emphasis on Chinese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Chinese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. This course is only open to students who have successfully completed one year or less of Chinese in secondary school within the previous eight years, and no university Chinese. Students cannot take CHI 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

CHI 102 Elementary Chinese II

Beginning Chinese language course with an emphasis on Chinese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Chinese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. CHI 101 (or equivalent skills) is a prerequisite for CHI 102. Students cannot take CHI 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

CHI 201 Intermediate Chinese I

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of Chinese culture and everyday Chinese, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or two or more years of high school Chinese, or equivalent skills. Students cannot take CHI 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

CHI 202 Intermediate Chinese II

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of Chinese culture and everyday Chinese, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 201 or equivalent skills. Students cannot take CHI 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

CHI 251 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CHI 351 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

CHI 451 Topics in Chinese

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

COM 212 Social Justice Documentary Editing

During this course, students will edit and distribute the film they shot during COM 212A: Social Justice Documentary Abroad. Student production teams will work under the careful guidance of their professor as they complete their films and create an outreach campaign to get the film seen by its target audience. There are no language or production prerequisites for this course. If not used for student’s major, can fulfill the Non-Western and International/Global Awareness (NW/IG) components of their Baccalaureate Experience Requirements. Offered every other spring.
Credit Hours: 2
(IG) (NW)

COM 212A Social Justice Documentary Abroad

This faculty-led travel course takes students abroad over winter term to make documentary films about non-profit organizations and social justice entrepreneurs. Destinations vary and past versions have included Ecuador, Morocco, and Thailand. While in-country, student production teams will conduct background research, write an outline, create a shot list, conduct interviews, and capture b-roll footage on location. There are no language or production prerequisites for this course. If not used for student’s major, can fulfill the Non-Western and International/Global Awareness (NW/IG) components of their Baccalaureate Experience Requirements.
Credit Hours: 2
(IG)(NW)

COM 222 Media Aesthetics and Creativity

In this class, students will be asked to explore their own creative processes and develop identities as creative thinkers and producers of media. Students will research theories about creativity; explore aesthetic principles relating to two-dimensional, interactive and time-based media; and experiment with traditional and experimental narrative techniques. The focus will be on developing creative concepts in pre-production phases (e.g., sketching, storyboarding, storytelling, writing treatments and artist statements, experimenting with electronic media). Students will work both individually and in groups; research and synthesize substantive ideas from outside influences; and effectively present ideas in oral, visual and written forms.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 224 Media and Society

Studies the fundamentals of communication theory to provide a foundation for understanding how the media work, how they influence us, how we can analyze them and how we can effectively use them. Students can apply these critical skills to their roles as responsible consumers and communication professionals. May be used to fulfill Social Science (SS) requirements if not used for the major. 

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

COM 225 Media Writing

An introduction to the principles and practices of writing for major types of mass communication media, with an emphasis on content, engagement, organization, conciseness and clarity. Students learn various styles of writing for print media, social media, broadcast media, the Web, advertising and public relations. This course also discusses the ethical and legal implications of writing for the media.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

COM 226 Introduction to Scriptwriting for Motion Pictures and Television

Students learn and practice the principles behind the art and craft of scriptwriting for short, single-camera "motion picture" format, and multi-camera, live audience television (such as situation comedies). May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

COM 227 Media in the Americas

Media in the Americas travels abroad to engage with Latin American media producers, regulators, scholars, and audiences. Students will experience first-hand how media policies, institutions, and technologies intersect with the politics and processes of media production, distribution, and consumption. If not used for student's major, this course can be counted towards fulfilling the Social Science (SS) and Non-Western and International/Global Awareness (NW/IG) requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience requirement.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)(IG)(NW)

COM 232 Visual Literacy

It is one of the great ironies of contemporary existence that we are beset, informed, controlled and constructed by images, yet we receive almost no formal training in understanding and creating visual communication. Visual Literacy addresses this issue through interdisciplinary study of the terminology and theory of visual communication, with special emphasis on the relationship of visuality and cultural practice. Considering ideas from art history, photography, film, mass media and cultural studies, students are asked to analyze visual rhetoric, begin to see critically, articulate meaning and author visual rhetoric of their own. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

COM 234 Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 236 UTTV Student Television

Produce broadcast news packages for UTTV: Spartan News, the University of Tampa’s student-run campus news channel. Students work in teams to research newsworthy stories and then use smartphone production kits to conduct on-camera interviews with experts and citizens, shoot b-roll on location, and write and record stand-ups and voice-overs before editing, revising, and posting their short videos to UTTV's social media feeds.
Credit Hours: 2 or 4
(HFA)

COM 242 Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship teaches digital media production as a means of identity exploration, ethical formation, and civic engagement. Through sound and image capture, editing, and distribution, students will learn to better recognize and more effectively advocate solutions to social problems and thereby develop the necessary skills to go from casual users of contemporary technologies to digital rhetoricians practicing active, engaged citizenship.

This is a CORE foundation course for all communication majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 250 WUTT Student Radio

Produce radio for WUTT: Spartan Radio, the University of Tampa’s student-run radio station (1080am, RadioFX, and TunedIn Radio). Students learn about radio regulations, marketing, licensing, DJing, interviewing guests, news, and sports while producing live, on-air radio shows both from the WUTT studio and on location during campus events.

Credit Hours: 2 or 4

COM 260 American Cinema

A basic introduction to film studies. Surveys the history of American narrative film with an emphasis on the cultural impact of film in society. May be used to fulfill the Art/Aesthetics (A) and Humanities and Fine Arts (HFA) requirements if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

COM 261 World Cinema

An examination of world cinema movements. May be used to fulfill the Art/Aesthetics (A), the Humanities and Fine Arts (HFA), and International/Global Awareness (IG) and Non-Western (NW) requirements if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW)

COM 283 Principles of Advertising

This course introduces students to the historical, cultural, economic, and social aspects of advertising. Students will discusses advertising’s relationship to marketing as well as its role in traditional and new media landscapes. This course also provides an overview of advertising management, advertising planning, advertising creativity and concepts, global advertising, and laws affecting advertising.

Credit Hours: 4

COM 284 Principles of Public Relations

This is an introductory course to public relations communication. The primary objectives of this course are to help students recognize the basic concepts and principles of public relations, to help them gain an understanding of the social importance of public relations in our community and organizations, and to help students personalize these concepts to their professional career interests.
Credit Hours: 4

COM 300 The Documentary Tradition

Survey course on the visual documentary tradition. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

COM 232 or consent of instructor.

COM 301 Introduction to Organizational Communication

This course introduces students to theory, research and applied practice in the study of organizational communication. Students will explore the role human communication plays in structuring, maintaining and changing organizations, and they will explore specific issues within the study of organizational communication including socialization, decision-making, conflict, stress and burnout, cultural diversity and external communication.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 302 Digital Media and Design for Communication

Students will develop critical perspectives on media consumption and creation while learning intermediate skills in design and imagining for visual communication in print, web, social media, and time-based media.  The course focuses on conceptual thinking and problem-solving in the development and production of digital media projects.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 110 or FMX 210; plus at least one of the following: COM 222, COM 224, COM 225, COM 232, COM 283; or consent of instructor.

COM 303 Studio Television I

Emphasizes formal aspects of studio video-production operations, including camera switching, lighting, sound and accessory equipment and remote-location production for integration into a studio program. This course provides production support for WUTV programming. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the communication major. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

COM 225 or COM 226 and one of the following: COM 242, JOU 221, or FMX 241.

COM 315 Web Design

This studio course introduces students to Web design techniques, technologies and theories, including HTML, CSS and Web design software. Almost all work is performed at a computer. Laboratory fee required.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 110, FMX 210, JOU 221 or consent of instructor.

COM 323 Digital Communication and Society

This course explores the social, political, economic, and cultural effects of emerging communication technologies.  Areas covered include the design and affordances of new technologies, how they are used by consumers and organizations, and how they are addressed by laws, policies, industries, and powerful social and cultural institutions. 

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 325 Writing for Broadcast News

This course covers the elements of broadcast news writing and production, including the structure of radio and television news and feature stories, research and interviewing techniques, "package" production and ethical considerations. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 225 or JOU 101

COM 327 Communication and Law

Communication and Law is the study of concepts, policies, laws and court decisions that affect communication in our society. Through text, scholarly and popular articles, sound and video recordings, court decisions, lectures and class participation, we explore critical legal principles of civilized democratic society and the range of laws that protect or restrain communication within it. In addition to examining such principles and laws for their own merit (or lack of it), the course provides a practical basis upon which students who seek to become communications professionals can identify legal issues that will influence their professional conduct.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224 or JOU 101

COM 332 Television Criticism

This is a survey of traditions of television criticism. The class covers key areas of television research and criticism, including narrative, aesthetic, production-oriented, economic, audience-centered, and ideological approaches to TV. The class will address questions related to TV as a technology, the broadcast and post-network eras of TV, the globalization of media programming, as well as a wide range of TV genres and their conventions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 333 Studio TV II

Live stream multi-camera video productions straight to social media. Students will produce a bi-monthly entertainment and information talk show that combines pre-recorded segments with live hosts, guest interviews, and in-studio demonstrations. Students are responsible for pitching stories, booking talent, writing scripts, and operating equipment. This course is modeled on Daytime, a nationally syndicated program produced in Tampa. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 303 or consent of instructor.

COM 334 Information and the New World Order

Examines the cultural, political, economic and ethical issues surrounding a complex, international communication movement known as the New World Information Order. Explores all aspects of the topic, with an emphasis on threats to the national sovereignty of developing countries, the bias of international news agencies and cultural imperialism. May be used to fulfill Third World requirements. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 335 Survey of Independent Video and Film

Students study and view tapes and films produced as part of the non-commercial independent movement. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

COM 232 or permission of the instructor.

COM 340 Screenwriting I

Covers the elements of writing feature film scripts including character development, dialogue and dramatic structure. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or COM 240.

COM 344 Special Topics

Credit Hours: 1-4

COM 346 Writing for Interactive Media

This course explores practice and theory of writing for interactive media, including hypertext and hypermedia, narrative games, critical games, and location-based media. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

One of the following: COM 225, COM 226, WRI 200, WRI 220, or FMX 240

COM 348 Writing the Situation Comedy

This course is an introduction to the mechanics of writing for television. From idea through final draft, students learn the process of developing scripts for television. The structural demands of commercial television and cable are explored. The student obtains a grounding in the historical development of marketable TV genres. The selling and buying of a script are analyzed, as well as strategies for creating a teleplay by oneself or with a staff of writers. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 226, FMX 240, or consent of instructor.

COM 350 Strategic Social Media

Students will learn how to use social media for strategic purposes, develop effective content, and measure success through analytics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 110 or FMX 210; and one of the following courses: COM 224, COM 283, COM 284, JOU 101

COM 354 Internship in Communication

This variable credit internship course is designed for Communication, Media, and Culture (COM) majors and advertising and public relations (AD/PR) majors. Key assignments include learning objectives, orientation seminar, informational interview, reports, and evaluations. Cannot be used to meet the 300-or-above-level requirement in either the COM or AD/PR major and may not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Credits (1-4) vary according to the number of hours worked at the internship host site.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, minimum GPA of 3.0 in major and consent of instructor.

COM 360 Film Directors

A search for the defining characteristics of a director's works, including issues of thematic motifs and visual style. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 260 or COM 261 or consent of instructor.

COM 361 Film Genres

This course will be an investigation into the thematic, theoretical, technical and structural concepts that contribute to our understanding of film genre. Students, through weekly informal writing as well as significant research-based formal papers, will sharpen their analytical, critical and research skills. Specifically, they will employ the methodology of critical inquiry and utilize appropriate vocabulary and processes to engage, through analysis, research, writing and discussion, in the dialogues of our discipline. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 260 or COM 261 or consent of instructor

COM 365 Critical Analysis of Media Events

The course is designed to introduce intermediate research methodologies to a student's critical analysis of large-scale media events. It involves the practical analysis of a media event, including circumstances, details, historical perspective and reactions by journalists, officials and the public. Archival coverage, documentaries, feature films, print articles and Internet sites relating to a singular or series of events will encompass a majority of the analysis. Particular attention will be given to events with international implications. Students will review the previous exposure of related topics in an effort to compare the attention given to a subject in a comparison of "before and after." May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

COM 370 Women, Film and Popular Culture

Focuses on the politics of representing women, particularly in film, television, advertising, popular literature and the popular press. The critical background includes texts on political economy, semiotics, feminist theory and cultural studies. The student completes a major research project during the course. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the humanities, but not for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

COM 232 or consent of the instructor.

COM 375 Critical Media Practice

This course familiarizes students with key theories, techniques, and media forms that will enable them to produce creative, well-researched and thought-provoking projects that embody critical media practice.  Each student will select and examine an issue of social importance, and research media platforms and rhetorical approaches suitable for that issue. Combining scholarship with media skills, the student will create a final media project. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 242

COM 383 Advertising Creative Direction

This lab course involves strategic concept development, copywriting, and media production, as well as ethical considerations related to these practices.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 283, plus either ART 110 or FMX 210

COM 384 Writing for Public Relations

This course involves training in theory, form and style for writing public relations materials for all stages and types of public relations campaigns. This course is designed to provide students with a broad range of public relations writing skills utilized in the industry.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, COM 225 or COM 284, or consent of instructor.

COM 388 Multicultural and Prosocial Strategic Communication

“For-profit” brands and companies have crossed-over to the traditionally “non-profit” territory, using their platforms in advertising and public relations (ADPR) to discuss social issues so as to promote social good and to achieve commercial success. This emerging market of prosocial consumers lead to changes in the practice of doing social good in ADPR. This demands our future ADPR practitioners to have the diversity/multicultural literacy that guides them to make appropriate and conscious decisions when applying multicultural and prosocial strategies. In this course, we will cover prosocial strategic decision-making, multicultural targeting/messages/markets, consumer diversity psychology, critical social issues, and related practices in ADPR.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224

COM 390 Ethnicity in Film and Literature (Honors)

For Honors Program students only. This course is an exploration of the concept of "ethnicity" and how it may be expressed through literature and film. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

COM 392 Independent Study in Communication

Research or creative project under the auspices of a communication instructor.  Students may take a maximum of 8 credit hours of independent study to fulfill the requirements of the major.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, COM 224, COM 225 or COM 226, and COM 232 and minimum GPA of 3.0, or consent of instructor

COM 401 Intercultural Communication

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the socio-cultural dynamics that affect the communication process. Students focus on their own cultural world view as they are exposed to the cultural dynamics and characteristics of other societies. Emphasis is placed upon the nonverbal and oral/visual aspects of communication content, structure and context. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

COM 425 Information Technology and Human Values

Raises fundamental questions about the relationship between science and the humanities. Analyzes the role of technology in modern life with special emphasis on the impact of new information technologies. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 426 Public Opinion, the Media and Power

Examines public opinion from a variety of perspectives, providing students with the ability to be intelligent consumers of public opinion research and effective users of public opinion research tools. Explores the interaction between the media and public opinion, as well as public opinion's effects on contemporary society and politics.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor.

COM 435 Women Directors: Theory and Criticism

Examines women directors worldwide. The course will focus on the theoretical, critical, historical, cultural and aesthetic basis of films made by international, mainstream, documentary and the avant-garde women film directors of New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, the African and Asian diasporas, and North and South America. Students will submit a series of written critical responses and complete a major project related to course material. May be counted in the humanities if not counted in the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201; or one of COM 232, COM 260 or COM 261; or one course in women's studies; or consent of instructor.

COM 436 Communication and Media Ethics

This course studies critical contexts of public communications to bring students an understanding of forces that shape media and representation, and relationships between mass communication and the public.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224.

COM 440 Screenwriting II

Advanced explorations of feature film scriptwriting and analysis. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COM 340 or consent of instructor.

COM 443 Communication and Cultural Studies

Students explore the role of communication in the social construction of culture. Emphasis is on acquiring knowledge of culture as an evolving process of codifications, and examining dominant and marginal cultural meaning systems in science, history and the arts. May be used to fulfill general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing or consent of instructor.

COM 445 The Image and the Reality

Explores the relationship between myth and cinema. Also looks at the politics of representation as it relates to race, gender and ethnicity. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements in the humanities if not used for the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and one of the following courses: COM 260, COM 261, COM 300, COM 308, COM 335, COM 360, COM 370 or COM 465, or consent of instructor.

COM 446 Advanced Topics in Communication

Credit Hours: 4

COM 450 Experimental Cinema: History and Theory

This course examines experimental, avant-garde cinema worldwide. It focuses on the theoretical, critical, historical, cultural and aesthetic basis of experimental and avant-garde films made by national and international directors. Students submit a series of written critical responses and complete a major project related to course material. May be counted in the humanities if not counted in the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 232, COM 260 or COM 261, or consent of instructor.

COM 455 Film Theory and Criticism

The course explores worldwide film theory and criticism from its roots to the present through lectures and screenings of international, global and non-western films.  Classical and contemporary theorists include Sergie Eisenstein, Andre Bazin, Gilles Deleuze, Walter Benjamin, Laura Mulvey, Lev Manovich and more. Issues of representation, the cinematic apparatus and semiotics including psychoanalytic film theory will be covered.  Students submit a series of written critical/theoretical responses and complete a conference style abstract and paper related to course material.  May be counted in the Humanities if not counted in the major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

Prerequisites

Any one of the following: COM 232, COM 260, COM 261, or any 300- or 400-level course in the "Media, Culture and Society" course offerings, or instructor consent.

COM 465 Senior Seminar in Cinema Studies

Seminar for seniors completing a thesis paper in cinema studies as the requirement for graduation in film and media arts. Each student pursues a cinema studies thesis project, in written form, of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences at the University. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, and any of the following: COM 300, COM 335, COM 360, COM 365, COM 370 or COM 445, or consent of instructor.

COM 466 International Advertising

The course is designed to help students integrate knowledge of advertising theory and practice within an international context. Instructor and students will meet occasionally over the spring semester for orientation and introduction to course material and spend two weeks abroad in May expanding the study and application of international advertising topics/concepts. In addition, the travel portion of the course will give students the opportunity to learn about and experience, first hand, advertising as a product and shaper of culture and the advertising industry’s role in a globalized economy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 283

COM 467 Advanced Film Analysis

Students will conduct deep analysis of films, delving into close readings of form and content, including character, dialogue, plot, mise-en-scene, camerawork & cinematography, editing and sound (diegetic and non-diegetic).  At the end of the course students will have an enhanced understanding of how multiple elements combine to create compelling stories and opportunities for interpretation in complex, primarily narrative, films.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Any two of the following COM courses: COM 335, COM 340, COM 360, COM 361, COM 370, COMH 390, or permission of instructor.

COM 470 Communication Research Methods

This course introduces students of communication to the core concepts and common practices of both quantitative and qualitative communication research. Students will be exposed to a variety of theoretical perspectives on the nature, practice, use and meaning of research in the field of communication. Particular emphasis will be placed on research concepts and methods appropriate to the practice of advertising and public relations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 224, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COM 475 Seminar in Critical Media Practice

The course emphasizes interpretation, discussion, and practice, building upon theoretical and practical knowledge students have acquired over the course of their study in critical media practice. Using traditional and emerging media technologies, students will produce projects over the course of the semester to convey critical perspectives on phenomena with social, cultural, economic, and/or political implications. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 375

COM 483 Advertising Campaigns

This course teaches strategic development of advertising campaigns and involves research, branding, copywriting, design and digital production. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ART 305 or COM 302, COM 383, and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COM 484 Public Relations Campaigns

This course focuses on a systematic process of public relations, including research, strategic planning, communication tactics and evaluation. Through an extensive public relations campaign project, students will understand and practice the multifaceted and strategic nature of public relations. The course involves case studies, group problem-solving, writing, production and client relations work.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 302 or ART 305, COM 384 and senior standing, or permission of instructor.

COM 490 Communication Major Portfolio Review

The Communication Major Portfolio Review is required for all communication majors, to be taken during their senior year. The course asks students to select and submit major works for review and assessment.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing, Communication Majors Only.

COM 499 Senior Project

Students must apply for acceptance the semester before their anticipated enrollment. Each year, a select number of students are able to choose a senior project option in order to fulfill the 400-level requirement of the communication major. In this independent course, a student or group of students pursue a research or production objective of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences as communication majors at the University.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing.

CRM 101 Introduction to Criminology

A study of deviant behavior as it relates to the definition of crime, crime statistics, theories of crime causation, crime typologies and victims of crime. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

CRM 102 Introduction to Criminal Justice

A study of the components of the criminal justice system from its early history through its evolution in the United States. Identifies various subsystems and their roles, expectations and interrelationships.
NOTE: This course does not satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 200 Law Enforcement

A study of the elements of law enforcement agencies as subsystems of the criminal justice system, the history and philosophy of law enforcement, and the relationship between law enforcement and the community.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 102.

CRM 206 Criminal Investigation

A study of the fundamentals of investigation including crime scene search, collection and preservation of physical evidence, interview and interrogation techniques, use of scientific aids and modus operandi.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 102

CRM 210 Ethics in Justice

An examination of the field of justice with emphases on decision-making, ethical thinking, codes of ethics and use of discretion throughout the justice system.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 212 Juvenile Delinquency

An examination of definitions of delinquent behavior, theories of delinquency and the adjudication process for juveniles. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 215 Crime Control Policy in the United States

Analysis of ideologies, assumptions, and performance of crime control policies. This course addresses the creation, real world implementation, as well as the various costs and benefits of current American crime control policy. This will be accomplished by examining the roots of formalized, rational social control through the criminal justice system, exploring contemporary issues, determining policy involvement of primary criminal justice system actors, while discussing their effectiveness and efficiency, and finally exploring special issues and topics that are at the heart of American crime control.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 240 Research Methods

An introduction to the quantitative and qualitative methodologies of the social sciences, including overviews of philosophy of science and research ethics, research design issues such as sampling and measurement, and methods of data collection (i.e., survey, experimental and evaluation research). Additionally, students will gain experience in reviewing scholarly literature, designing a research project in criminal justice/criminology, and writing for an academic audience utilizing the APA format. Through those goals, students will become both consumers and producers of research.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101

CRM 245 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal Justice

This course serves as an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and the computer analysis of criminology and criminal justice data. Course content includes basic procedures of hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis and the analysis of continuous and binary dependent variables. Emphasis is placed on the examination of research problems and issues in the field of criminology and criminal justice. This is primarily a lecture course, with some in-class and out of class lab work.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 240

CRM 248 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

A comparative study of the United States criminal justice system with those of other countries. Countries will vary. This course may be repeated for credit when countries change.

Credit Hours: 2

CRM 248A Comparative Criminal Justice Systems/Travel Course

A comparative study of the United States criminal justice system with those of other countries through personal observation of agencies of the countries visited and personal interaction with agency personnel. Countries visited will vary. This course may be repeated for credit when countries change.
Credit Hours: 2

CRM 249 Human Trafficking and Child Exploitation

This course will examine the many forms of human trafficking and child exploitation, the plight of victims, and domestic and global approaches for control of human trafficking and child exploitation.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 290 Special Summer Studies

Special course offered each year during the summer session. Course descriptions are published annually in a separate bulletin.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 300 Victimology

An examination of the extent and nature of victimization, theories of victimization, the victims' rights movement and consideration of several major kinds of victimization.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102

CRM 307 Crime Scene Investigation

An examination of scientific techniques used to develop forensic evidence discovered at a crime scene offered in a practical laboratory setting.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 102

CRM 310 Abnormal Behavior and Criminality

An overview of abnormal behavior as it relates to the criminal justice system. Emphasis placed on personality disorders, psychoses, sexual predators and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 311 Criminal Law and Procedure

This course provides an in-depth examination of criminal law and procedure, including issues related to the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments as well as substantive criminal law, liability and defenses.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 102

CRM 313 Corrections

An introduction to the American correctional system emphasizing the history of corrections, the prison experience and correctional clientele. May be used to satisfy general distribution requirements if not used in the criminology major.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

Prerequisites

CRM 102 and junior or senior standing

CRM 321 Comparative Criminology

A comparison of diverse types of criminal justice systems utilized by other countries and cultures with the United States criminal justice system.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 323 Correctional Law

A study of substantive and procedural law pertaining to the convicted criminal offender, including an examination of federal court decisions affecting correctional personnel and the penal process.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 324 Criminological Theory

This course will introduce the student to theoretical approaches to the explanations of crime.  This introduction will allow the student to appreciate and secure a basic understanding of the complex factors that are related to crime as well as the historical development of such approaches.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102 and junior or senior standing

CRM 400 Crime and Punishment: Current Controversies

An in-depth examination of current controversial issues of crime and punishment in the United States.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 401 Internship in Criminology

A meaningful field experience through placement in agencies of the criminal justice system. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Students may take a maximum of 16 credit hours while at UT. Internship credit may not be used to satisfy requirements for the major or the minor.

Credit Hours: 4-16

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.8 (3.2 for federal internships)

CRM 403 Drugs, Deviance and Crime

An in-depth analysis of the nature and extent of drug use within American society, and its relationship to crime and deviance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing

CRM 406 Violence in America

A study of the broad range of violence in society, examining historical and contemporary forms of violence. Topics explored include gun crime, serial murders and terrorism.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 or CRM 102 and junior or senior standing.

CRM 409 White Collar and Elite Crime

This course will explore the full range of white collar and elite crimes that are described in the criminological literature. The seriousness of these crimes will be examined in addition to the motivation, techniques, public impact, investigation and the prosecution of offenders and their punishment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102 and CRM 200 and junior or senior standing

CRM 421 Special Issues in Criminal Justice

A forum for focusing on special issues in criminal justice, taught by visiting instructors or regular faculty. Topics covered may change each semester. May be repeated for credit if the topic changes.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 422 Terrorism

This course will examine the origins and development of modern terrorism, from its origins during the Cold War to the present.  Through lectures, case studies, and class discussions this course will investigate general and specific elements relevant to understanding the phenomenon, including definition, national and international terrorism, global and regional factors, and terrorism’s relationship with rebellion and insurgency.  This course will examine terrorist organizations to understand the ideologies, cultures, structures, and causative factors behind major movements.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102 and CRM 200

CRM 427 Death Penalty

An examination of historical, contemporary and international perspectives on the death penalty, and ramifications for victims' families, offenders, the criminal justice system and society as a whole.

Credit Hours: 4

CRM 432 Race, Class, Gender and Crime

This course will address how racism, classism and sexism operate and intersect in both criminological theories and in the criminal legal system. This course explores theories used to explain crime and covers victimization, offending and work in terms of race, class and gender. The section on offending will address theories, types of offending, systemic responses to offending and prisons.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101 and CRM 102

CRM 433 Complexities of Drug Trafficking

This course examines the issues associated with international drug trafficking and counter-drug law policies/practices. It explores these issues within the context of the various political, geographical and socio-economic factors that influence international drug trafficking and counter-drug policies/practices.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CRM 101, CRM 102 and CRM 200

CRM 450 Independent Study

A series of directed readings and short research projects on topics of interest to the student, determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-5

Prerequisites

Senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.0.

CRM 451 Senior Thesis

Requires a substantive research and writing project.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, a minimum GPA of 3.25, membership in the Honors Program or approval of department chair.

CRM 601 Proseminar in Criminal Justice Issues

Survey of current research, critical issues in the administration of justice, and criminological theory. Designed to acquaint students with recent developments in the disciplines of criminology and criminal justice.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 603 Criminological Theory

Examines criminological theories with emphasis on the origins and applications of relevant theoretical approaches to crime and criminally deviant behavior. Overview of the major paradigms focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior with special attention given to the social, political and intellectual milieu within which each perspective arose. The course will include a discussion of criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective focusing upon such issues as theory construction, theoretical integration and the formal evaluation of theory.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 605 Criminal Justice Policy and Program Evaluation

This course explores the principles, techniques, and practices of program evaluation providing basic and advanced methods of evaluation research in a real-world environment. The course will devote particular attention to the criteria for assessing policy outcomes and the idiosyncrasies of working with and within the criminal justice system. The relationship between sound scientific evaluation techniques and effectiveness of criminal justice policy is also emphasized.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 607 Research Design and Methods

Analytical strategies and methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative research and their applications to problems of crime and criminal justice. Includes definition of research problems, research design, sampling, measurement, data collection, interviewing, and participant observation and ethical concerns.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 609 Statistics for Criminal Justice Research

This course develops proficiency in quantitative and qualitative data analysis techniques using computerized statistical programs such as SPSS. Statistical theory and research design issues with interpretation of descriptive and graphical techniques; probability and sampling theory; the normal curve and statistical inference; Central Limit Theorem; Chi-Square, T and F distributions; ANOVA; MANOVA; linear regression; multivariate regression; and factor analysis will be discussed.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 611 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice

This course will examine the ethics and moral philosophy in criminal justice including the role of natural law, constitutional law, code of ethics and philosophical principles. The origins of ethical standards the effect of these standards on the administration of justice, and issues of ethical leadership will be addressed. Strong emphasis will be put on examining the roles of justice in a free society and the practical implications of justice to practitioners of police, courts and corrections.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 613 Policing and Public Policy

Analysis of the development of public policy and criminal justice planning used to solve problems encountered in policing. Problem identification that lead to public policy making, strategic management of law enforcement policy, and the role of police executives as agents of change. Historical and contemporary issues in policing that require policy changes will be explored.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 615 Corrections and Public Policy

Analysis of the history, culture, and structure of correctional systems and current issues facing correctional administrators. Problem identification that leads to public policy making, strategic management of corrections policy, and the role of corrections executives as agent of change will be explored.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 617 Justice, Law and Public Policy

This course involves the analysis of the development of law and public policy in the criminal justice system, the different contexts within which these laws and policies are developed and implemented, and their overall effectiveness over time. Policy development and legislative processes are explored, along with the process of strategic planning.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 619 Victimology

The study of interrelationships between crime, criminals, victims, and the criminal justice system. Examines patterns and trends in victimization. Identifies the categories of people facing the greatest risks and assesses victim-blaming arguments that invoke facilitation, precipitation and provocation. Analyzes the handling of crime victims by the criminal justice system and explores issues related to victim’s rights, restorative justice, as well as the psychological, financial, and medical needs and problems of the victim.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 621 White Collar Crime

Defines white collar crime and the implications associated with enforcement of laws related to white collar criminality and prosecution of such offenses and sentencing of offenders. Examines theoretical explanations for white collar crime and questions of corporate liability. Economic, social, and political costs of corporate and white collar crime will be compared to street crime. Various forms of white collar crime will be examined and illustrated through case studies and research including estimates of cost, victim and offender profiles, and legal issues. Global frauds committed by transnational corporations will be explored.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 623 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Examines the diverse types of criminal justice systems throughout the world; analyzes the relationship between crime rates and differential criminal justice systems, as well as socioeconomic development indicators. In-depth analysis of major legal traditions across the world including common law, civil law, socialist law, and Islamic law with the impact of each on approaches to law enforcement, criminal law & procedure, and corrections.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 649 Independent Study in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Provides an opportunity for students to collaborate independently with a faculty member on a scholarly research project that is of interest to the student. Upon completion of the experience, results of research findings will be presented to department faculty and criminology and criminal justice majors. Course is open to students with a GPA of 3.0 or above and at least twenty earned credit hours of graduate work including any two of the following courses: CRM 605, CRM 607, and CRM 609.
Credit Hours: 4

CRM 650 Thesis

Use of research strategies; principles of research writing and procedures for initiating, executing, and completing a master's thesis. Preparation and approval of a prospectus followed by completion and defense of the thesis will be accomplished.
Credit Hours: 1-4

CSC 101 The Science of Computing I

An introduction to computing. Topics include problem solving, algorithm analysis and development, computer programming in Python, data structures, computer organization and architecture, and the object-oriented paradigm.
Credit Hours: 4

CSC 102 The Science of Computing II

More in-depth coverage of computing. Topics include problem solving, algorithm analysis and development, object-oriented programming in Python, high-level data structures, computer organization and architecture, and various applications of computing.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 101 The Science of Computing I (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 201 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

The storage and manipulation of basic data structures such as arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and graphs. Emphasis is placed on practical applications of these data structures.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 102 The Science of Computing II (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 210 Computer Organization and Architecture

Architecture and organization of computer systems. Computer organization topics include data representation, digital logic, Boolean algebra, minimization techniques. Computer architecture topics include the CPU, instruction set architectures, memory hierarchy and management, input/output systems, alternative architectures, performance measurement and analysis.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 102 The Science of Computing II (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 220 Operating Systems and Systems Programming

An introduction to systems programming (in the context of Linux and C/C++) and operating systems. Topics include include linking, writing scripts, performing system calls, managing memory, and using concurrency; process management, storage management, device management, performance, and security.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 201 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 230 Software Design and Engineering

Design, construction, and maintenance of large software systems. Project planning, requirements analysis, software design methodologies, software implementation and testing, maintenance.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 201 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 301 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms

Advanced data structures and algorithm design and analysis. Topics include analysis techniques, advanced searching and sorting, advanced data structures (e.g., specialized trees, graphs), algorithm design techniques, and NP-completeness.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 230 Software Design and Engineering (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 310 Ethics and Impact of Computing

An examination of the ethical, social, and legal implications of computers, computing, communications, and other digital technologies. Emphasis is placed on writing and professional presentations (including debates). This course includes a significant amount of writing through several standalone essays and a major paper that is developed in an iterative process with frequent feedback.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

CSC 230 Software Design and Engineering (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 320 Theory of Computation

An overview of formal languages, the abstract models of computing capable of recognizing those languages, and the grammars used to generate them.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 301 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms and MAT 270 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (with grades of "C" or better)

CSC 330 Introduction to Computer Network Security

Overview of cyber security. Provides students with practical cyber security experience based on theoretical foundations. Topics include: cryptography, computer network defense, covert channels, reverse engineering, steganography, access control, web site exploitation, and other relevant and current topics in security.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 201 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 340 Database Management Systems

The theory, design, and implementation of relational database management systems. Topics include effective storage, security, and applied applications of legacy storage. Emphasis on the practical steps towards the creation of effective database management systems and the implementation of a simple database.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 201 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 350 Web Programming and Development

A comprehensive overview of Website development. Includes both server- and client-side installation, configuration, and programming; database integration; and an overview of security implications and considerations.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 230 Software Design and Engineering (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 401 Senior Capstone I

This course allows students to integrate what they have learned throughout the curriculum in an applied, real world setting. Students work in teams on a major project, applying software engineering principles along the way. The course also emphasizes professional presentations and technical reports at various points in the project. This is the first half of the senior capstone experience, where teams will begin their work on a major project.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Senior status and CSC 301 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 402 Senior Capstone II

This course allows students to integrate what they have learned throughout the curriculum in an applied, real world setting. Students work in teams on a major project, applying software engineering principles along the way. The course also emphasizes professional presentations and technical reports at various points in the project. This is the second half of the senior capstone experience, where teams will finish their work on a major project and present their results.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

CSC 401 Senior Capstone I (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 410 Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

An overview of AI, including history, impact, implications, and the potential of artificial intelligence. Machine learning: perceptrons, multi-layer networks, and deep learning. Classical AI: game playing and search, propositional logic, first order logic, inference. Knowledge representation.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 301 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 420 Programming Languages and Compilers

Techniques for specifying the syntax and semantics of programming languages, including language concepts, execution environments, comparative analysis of programming languages. Principles of compiler design, including lexical analysis, syntax analysis, error detection and recovery.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

CSC 301 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms (with a grade of "C" or better)

CSC 450 Independent Study in Computer Science

Independent project developed under the guidance of a Computer Science faculty member. Students can apply by consulting with and submitting a project proposal to a Computer Science faculty member for 1-4 credits.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior status, minimum GPA of 3.0, and consent of instructor

CSC 499 Special Topics in Computer Science

A special topics course that allows faculty members to explore topics in computer science. May be repeated for additional credit, with a maximum of 8 credits total.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor

CYB 610 Cloud Systems Security

Introduction to the important concepts pertaining to securing cloud-based information technology infrastructure.  Covers architectural and design requirements of cloud systems.  Includes data, platform and application security topics.  Cloud operations and legal and compliance issues are examined.  Experiential labs and assignments using a large cloud service provider is integrated in the course.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251, ITM 280 and ITM 350.

CYB 620 Risk Assessment & Contingency Planning

An overview of the processes and considerations required to properly prepare organizations for significant disruptions to operations and IT infrastructures.  A comprehensive risk management framework will be covered to prepare students to conduct both enterprise and IT risk assessments.  Students will then learn how to design, implement and test contingency plans including business impact analyses, business continuity plans, and disaster recovery plans.  To apply knowledge obtained in the course, students will participate in case discussions, simulations, and projects.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251, ITM 280 and ITM 350.

CYB 630 Incident Response Management

Introduction to incident response management and digital forensics.  The course examines the skills and knowledge needed to conduct formal investigations and manage incident response teams.  Attention is given to system breaches, advanced persistent threats, and anti-forensic practices.  The course covers the skills needed to collect and analyze data from Windows and Linux systems.  Experiential labs and assignments using forensic tools is integrated in the course.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251, ITM 280 and ITM 350.

CYB 640 Secure Software Design

This course covers a broad range of topics relating to processes and procedures for developing secure software systems and common vulnerabilities found in software applications.  Taking a holistic approach to application security, the course discusses common technical vulnerabilities found in software, procedures for mitigating such vulnerabilities, and general procedures to ensure software is developed in a secure manner.  Content is based on the Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP) curriculum and is supplemented by hands-on experience in finding and remediating vulnerabilities in software solutions.
Credit Hours: 4

CYB 650 Security Governance & Leadership

The course covers the strategic role of cybersecurity managers within an organization. Students will learn how to implement various governance frameworks and security concepts in a business environment.  Students develop leadership skills to be more effective managers including Chief Information Security Officers of organizations.  The course will prepare students how to design, operate, maintain, and assess holistic information security programs. Moreover, students learn how to provide effective information security consulting to organizations.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251, ITM 280 and ITM 350.

CYB 660 Penetration Testing

A course covering offensive security and hacking techniques.  The course takes a hands-on approach to penetration testing and vulnerability scanning in a lab environment.  Topics include scripting, target reconnaissance, scanning, exploitation and post-exploitation.  Open source tools are used throughout the course.  Ethics and legal considerations are emphasized.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251, ITM 280 and ITM 350.

CYB 670 Cybersecurity Research Seminar

Taking this course will expose students to a range of historic and current research in cybersecurity to understand problems of interest to the field and methods used to address them. Students will learn how to conduct high quality research for both academic and practitioner purposes. Students will utilize state-of-the-art software to conduct data analysis and will gain a better understanding of how to interpret the results.
Credit Hours: 4

CYB 675 Cybersecurity Graduate Thesis

Qualified students working in class meetings and individually with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. The thesis must be a substantial piece of work demonstrating the use of research methods and presentation of research results. Students are expected to present their work to their peers and participate in research events organized by the university. This course is a six-credit hour thesis and is expected to take two semesters to complete.
Credit Hours: 6

Prerequisites

CYB 670 and instructor permission

CYB 695 Special Topics in Cybersecurity

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in cybersecurity and information systems.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

CYB 699 Independent Study in Cybersecurity

A course offered at the discretion of Cybersecurity faculty. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.
Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering

DAN 100 Introduction to Dance

A studio/performance-oriented, course that explores, dance vocabulary, dance technique and dance history in various dance disciplines and familiarizes students with little or no dance experience with basic movement concepts and styles.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 102 Applied Dance Fundamentals I

For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only.  This studio/performance multimodal course focuses on introducing the student to healthy, well-informed engagement as a practicing dance educator.  Material covered includes instruction and practice in overall self-care; an introduction to creative movement and, dance vocabulary; the concept of multiple intelligences; and introduction to brain-compatible dance pedagogy; and an introduction to the National Dance Standards.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

DAN 110 Ballroom Dance I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on development of basic skills of ballroom dance, the art of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques, including improvisation and creativity.  Emphasis is on standard ballroom dances, including waltz, rumba, mambo/salsa, tango, swing, and hustle.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 141 Beginning Jazz Dance I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of jazz techniques and includes strengthening, stretching, basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. Required for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 142 Beginning Modern Dance I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of modern dance technique, and includes strengthening, stretching, basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 144 Beginning Tap Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on basics of tap dance technique and includes basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. Required for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 145 Dance Partnering for the Stage

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on development of basic skills of working with a partner in class as well as onstage. Explores the fundamentals of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques as well as an introduction to basic lifts and dynamics of mutual support. Includes some basic ballroom forms as well as partner improvisation. Required for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 149 Beginning Ballet I

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on fundamentals of classical ballet techniques and includes basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. Required for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 151 Beginning Hip Hop, Urban and Funk

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on the fundamentals of hip hop and funk technique and includes basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 191 West African Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on development and exploration of West African dance techniques and tradition and includes basic movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity.  May be repeated once. 

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 197 Beginning Jazz Dance II

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on the further development of jazz techniques and includes strengthening, stretching, more advanced movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. Required for a major in Musical Theatre.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 141 or consent of instructor.

DAN 198 Beginning Modern Dance II

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on the further development of modern dance techniques, and includes strengthening, stretching, more advanced movement combinations, improvisations, postural awareness and creativity. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 142 or consent of instructor.

DAN 199 Beginning Ballet II

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on further development of classical ballet techniques and incorporates strengthening, stretching, more advanced movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness and creativity. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 149 or permission of instructor.

DAN 200 Dance in World Cultures

An examination of non-Western dance forms, including classical, ceremonial and folk/traditional, in their historical and cultural contexts. This course is enhanced by observing video and live performances.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

DAN 201 Dance History

A historical overview of 3,000 years of dance as an art form that has become a unique means of aesthetically expressing human emotions. Enhances study through viewing of videotapes and live performances.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

DAN 202 Applied Dance Fundamentals II

This studio/performance multimodal course builds on concepts and practices from Applied Dance Fundamentals I.  Includes the 5-part lesson plan and dance concepts of brain-compatible teaching methods and teaching philosophy. Required for Dance Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours: 2
(A)

Prerequisites

DAN 102

DAN 210 Ballroom Dance II

A studio/performance-oriented course focuses on development of basic skills of Latin ballroom dance, the art of two bodies moving as one through the use of lead and follow techniques, including improvisation and creativity. Emphasis is on Latin dance forms, including salsa, samba, bachata, rumba and merengue. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 231 Dance Happening Repertory

A seven week studio/performance-oriented course for credit that includes choreographing, performing or assisting with the presentation of the Dance Happening. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 232 Spring Dance Concert Repertory

A studio/performance-oriented course for credit that includes performing in, or assisting with the technical production of the Spring Dance Concert. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 0-1
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 241 Intermediate Jazz Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on working towards mastery of jazz technique, and includes strengthening, stretching, complex movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. Fulfills jazz dance requirement for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 197 or consent of instructor.

DAN 242 Intermediate Modern Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on working toward mastery of modern dance techniques and includes strengthening, stretching, complex movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 198 or consent of instructor.

DAN 244 Intermediate Tap Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on working towards mastery of tap techniques, and  includes strengthening, stretching, complex movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 144 or permission of instructor.

DAN 246 Musical Theatre Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on mastery of modern and jazz dance technique as it pertains to musical theater dance/performance and includes strengthening, stretching, complex movement combinations, postural awareness, and creativity.  Required for a major in Musical Theatre. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

DAN 249 Intermediate Ballet

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on working towards mastery of classical ballet techniques and includes strengthening, stretching, complex movement combinations, improvisation, postural awareness, and creativity.  May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 199 or consent of instructor.

DAN 261 Stretching and Relaxation

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on development and reinforcement of positive lifestyle habits based on body awareness through a systematic program of stretching and relaxation techniques. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 2
(HFA/ST)

DAN 269 Dance Improvisation

A studio/performance-oriented course that explores creative movement skills and practices to build confidence, as well as techniques to prepare for building and choreographing dances. Emphases are on stretching boundaries of movement through improvisation, and practicing ways in which movement can be developed and manipulated toward choreography.

Credit Hours: 1
(A) (HFA/ST))

DAN 270 Composition and Choreography

A studio/performance-oriented course. An exploration of methods of building and structuring dances, beginning with movement, phrasing and patterns, and culminating in choreography projects. May be repeated once.

Credit Hours: 1
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 269.

DAN 302 Applied Dance Fundamentals III

This studio/performance multimodal course builds on concepts and practices from Applied Dance Fundamentals II.  Focuses on brain-compatible teaching practice in established dance technique classes.  Required for Dance Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

DAN 202

DAN 320 Dance Anatomy, Kinesiology and Injury Prevention

Emphasis is on basic kinesiology principles and terminology as applied to dance training and technique with a focus on muscular-skeletal anatomy and function.  Includes assessment of core strength, muscular strength, balance, flexibility, and skeletal alignment in the context of a typical dance class.  Familiarizes students with common dance injuries, their causes, and basic methods of care and rehabilitation.  All of these areas will be applied to creating a safe and effective dance class.  Required for Dance Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours: 3
(HFA)

Prerequisites

DAN 102, DAN 242 or DAN 342, DAN 249 or DAN 349; or permission of instructor

DAN 330 Special Topics in Dance

Special Topics in Dance will offer instruction and experiences in dance-related courses such as specialized dance techniques, dance theory and pedagogy. May be repeated once.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(A) (HFA)

DAN 342 Advanced Contemporary Dance

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on complex contemporary dance techniques while exploring creativity and individual movement styles.  May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 242 or permission of instructor.

DAN 349 Advanced Ballet

A studio/performance-oriented course that focuses on mastery of advanced level ballet technique and includes complex movement combinations, improvisation, and creativity.  May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 3
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

DAN 249 or audition.

DAN 380 Teaching Methods for Dance

This course is designed to meet the needs of students to better understand the developmental considerations and the scope and sequence of dance curricular design and teaching methods appropriate to a wide range of ages and groups. National Dance Standards and application of assessment methods also will be utilized.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only. DAN 202 or permission of instructor.

DAN 410 Applied Dance Internship

An intensive study involving the application of theoretical, philosophical, and pedagogical principles of dance education for the targeted population. Application for internship must be approved at least one semester prior to enrollment for the course.  Lectures and seminars about curriculums and instruction issues will be presented at the University.  Field experience placements will be based on elementary, secondary, or other community settings available at the time. 

Credit Hours: 0-4

Prerequisites

An elective course for Applied Dance Majors only. DAN 380 and senior status.

DAN 450 Senior Capstone Project

This capstone course presents an opportunity to integrate skills and experiences into a final culminating project.  Sample topics range from creating a business plan for opening a dance studio to designing a program for a community-based dance program to constructing a plan and curriculum for movement-based learning in the classroom.  There will be an emphasis on the practical application of the project. 

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

For Applied Dance Majors only. Senior status.

DAN 480 Teaching Methods for Community and Diverse Populations

This course is designed to help students to understand community-based art, and how to create--through research, writing, and practice--movement-oriented programs and relationships with community centers and organizations that include age considerations, curricular choices, and teaching methods appropriate to diverse populations.  Focus includes working with a variety of populations, which may include the mentally ill, older adults, people with disabilities, people in prisons, and people in hospitals and healthcare settings.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

DAN 380. For Applied Dance Majors and Minors only.

ECO 204 Principles of Microeconomics

An economic analysis of the interactions between households, businesses and the government regarding the allocation of goods, services and resources. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, production and cost determination, and resource pricing.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

MAT 150 competency recommended (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ECO 205 Principles of Macroeconomics

An introduction to aggregate economic analysis; use of the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model for the determination of output, employment and prices; use of the production possibilities curve analysis to illustrate opportunity cost and to show gains from trade applying the concept of comparative advantage; structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System; and conduct of monetary policy.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

MAT 150 competency recommended (all COB majors are required to take MAT 225).

ECO 300 Labor Economics

Labor economics examines the organization, functioning and outcomes of labor markets; the decisions of prospective and present labor market participants; and the public policies relating to the employment and payment of labor resources.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204 and ECO 205.

ECO 310 Environmental Economics and Management

The course teaches students to use economic concepts to critically evaluate social, political and business decisions regarding environmental resource use, environmental regulation and environmental degradation. Students will gain insight into how to respond as business decision-makers to environmental regulations and to increased global competition for scarce resources.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204.

ECO 315 International Economic Development

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction and overview of development economics. The course will focus on the economies of countries other than the United States, explore the interaction between the developed and the less-developed economies of the world, and examine international trade and environmental issues in developing countries.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204 and ECO 205.

ECO 320 Intermediate Microeconomics

This course analyzes consumer choice theory; the theory of production; competitive, oligopolistic and monopolistic market structures; and behavioral economics.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

ECO 321 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

This course is designed to analyze the domestic and international impacts of public policy on GDP, employment, inflation, the trade deficit and budget surplus, the international flow of capital, foreign exchange rate variations and international competitiveness.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

ECO 340 Game Theory

Game theory is the study of behavior in the context of strategic interdependence. It is critical to understanding behavior and outcomes when an individual's welfare depends on both their own choices and the choices of others. This course introduces the core concepts of game theory, including modeling strategic interdependence, dominant, dominated, and rationalizable strategies, best replies, Nash equilibria in pure, continuous and mixed strategies, repeated games, extensive-form games and subgame perfection, imperfect and asymmetric information, auctions, voting, bargaining, mechanism design, and evolutionary game theory. Applications include topics in economics, business, politics, sports, and life.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204, MAT 225 (or equivalent), and QMB 210 (or equivalent).

ECO 355 Economic History

This course will guide students to better understand historical events by utilizing their knowledge of economic methods. We will analytically apply economic theory and other mathematical methods to the study of history. The goal will be to understand why major changes in our socioeconomic environment have taken place over the passage of human history. For example, we will learn why certain civilizations conquered others, why certain regions are wealthier than others, and we will study the determinants of human prosperity in order to be able to understand how we have become so rich relative to our ancestors.  
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 204 and ECO 205

ECO 360 Health Economics

This course provides the core microeconomic theories needed to understand the health care markets in both the developed and developing world. Topics will include basic microeconomic models, demand for health care, supply of health care, insurance markets, and country-specific health care systems. The content of this course will help you evaluate health policy debates from an economic framework and interpret empirical evidence in health economics. 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204

ECO 420 Public Choice and the Economics of Politics

Public Choice is the study of the economics of politics using applied microeconomics. It examines decision making within democratic political structures. The course examines the economics of voting, bureaucracy, political economy, and constitutional design, from the perspective of private individuals, elected officials, and special interest groups. The tools of the course are used to analyze contemporary policy issues including voting rights, political entrepreneurship, foreign aid/intervention, and taxation policy. Students are required to undertake individualized research projects, applying the core materials from the course to their own areas of interest.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

Prerequisites

ECO 320.

ECO 421 Mathematical Economics

The purpose of this course is to learn modeling techniques and apply them to current issues in modern economic research. Students will learn how to specify economic problems in terms of a mathematical model, solve them and interpret the results. Computational software programs are used in the course to solve these models and plot the results.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

MAT 225 (or equivalent) and ECO 320 or ECO 321.

ECO 430 International Economics and Finance

This course covers the core concepts of international trade and international finance. The first half of the semester is devoted to international trade, including the basis for trade, gains from trade, trade policy and factor mobility. The second half of the semester is dedicated to international macroeconomics-finance, including balance of payments, foreign exchange rates and international capital flows. There will be a continual focus on current events throughout the semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 320 or ECO 321.

ECO 432 Economics of Emerging Markets

This course will examine major economic and financial issues related to emerging markets, with a particular emphasis on the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). The following topics will be considered: economic liberalization programs undertaken by emerging markets in recent decades, growth drivers in the emerging markets, financial sector challenges facing key emerging markets, and monetary policy challenges faced by emerging markets.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 435 Forecasting

To learn the theory and practice of economic and business forecasting.  Students begin with an in depth analysis of relevant statistical tools and regression techniques.  Students apply these tools to develop forecasting models of data that contain trends and seasonality.  ARIMA models are developed to study cyclical behavior.  By the end of the course, students are able to combine these tools to build forecasts of data that contain trends, seasonality, and cyclical behavior.  Throughout the course, the software program E-views is used to create forecasts of real world examples from business and economics.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 320 and ECO 321.

ECO 442 Monetary Economics

This course will provide an advanced treatment of key topics in the field of monetary economics.  The course aims to instill in students a deep understanding of the economic role of money and banking.  Models of money demand (Baumol-Tobin model, etc.), along with a thorough analysis of factors influencing money supply, will be considered.  Structural aspects of major central banks will be discussed, and, sophisticated insights into domestic and international monetary policy transmission mechanisms will be highlighted.  Economic modeling of currency crises will be discussed.  Key aspects of the international monetary system will be stressed as well.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 460 Econometrics

The course introduces basic econometric techniques that are of value to economics and business majors. The emphasis will be on understanding the linear regression model, including some key extensions and relevant applications. Besides basic fundamentals of regression analysis, the course will cover panel data models, instrumental variables, causality, time series and forecasting. Students will be required to undertake a forecasting exercise as part of the requirements for completion of the course.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

Either ECO 320 or ECO 321, and MAT 225 (or equivalent).

Corequisites

BAC 100.

ECO 461 Seminar in Economics

This course is designed to provide upper-level economics majors with a broad overview of key topics in economics. Areas of emphasis include U.S. and global economic conditions, monetary policy, economic growth and international economics. This is an applications course, relating the theoretical framework of economics to real-world economic developments. Students who successfully complete the course will have a good grasp of some of the fundamental economic issues and developments currently affecting the U.S. and global economies.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

ECO 321.

ECO 490 Economics Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8
(SS)

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing, ECO 320 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

ECO 495 Special Topics in Economics

A course offered at the discretion of the economics department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ECO 499 Independent Study in Economics

A readings or independent study course taken for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA and consent of the department chair and associate dean.

ECO 500 Foundational Economics for Managers

For graduate students only. This is an introductory course in macroeconomics and microeconomics for graduate business students. It studies inflation, unemployment and growth. It develops the theory of how markets work, with special attention to how prices are set in different market structures. Topics include opportunity cost; comparative advantage; supply, demand and prices; elasticity; production and cost; aggregate demand and aggregate supply; monetary and fiscal policy; and trade and exchange rates.

Credit Hours: 4

ECO 605 Economics of Global Inequality and Poverty

For graduate students only. This course covers current topics in income inequality and poverty within both developed and developing countries. For both inequality and poverty, students will study the various methods of economic measurement and identify recent dynamic trends. Empirical evidence will be used to scrutinize and explore current theoretical arguments aimed at explaining the trends. The course will analyze contemporary policies at both the country level and within global institutions (IMF, World Bank, bilateral aid programs) aimed at alleviating poverty and lessening inequality, and examine the linkages among inequality, poverty, growth, education technology and globalization.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 610 Environmental Economics and Management

For graduate students only. The course teaches students to use economic concepts to critically evaluate social, political and business decisions regarding environmental resource use, environmental regulation and environmental degradation. Students will gain insight into how to respond, as business decision-makers, to environmental regulations and to increased global competition for scarce resources.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500 or permission of instructor.

ECO 611 Econometrics

This course provides a survey of econometric methods useful for solving problems within business analytics. By combining econometric techniques with real-world data, students learn to model relevant microeconomic and macroeconomic phenomena ranging from a firms sales forecast and cost function to economy-wide consumption and unemployment. Inferences from the models and their implications on business decisions are drawn from model testing. Each week begins with a Power Point lecture and short reading, which are then followed by on-line labs using data to address real-world problems with econometric software. Students are assessed through quizzes, labs, homework and two exams. 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500. For graduate students only.

ECO 622 Global Macroeconomy

For graduate students only. This course introduces students to the global economic environment within which all modern business firms operate. The external factors considered, which directly or indirectly impact business decision-making and operations, include: domestic and foreign interest rates, exchange rate policies, foreign investment, overseas economic conditions, and international trade and capital flows. A primary objective of the course is to introduce students to major contemporary economic issues that are of international significance.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 632 Economics of Emerging Markets

For graduate students only. The course will examine major economic and financial issues related to emerging markets, with a particular emphasis on the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). The following topics will be considered: Economic liberalization program undertaken by emerging markets in recent decades; Growth drivers in the emerging markets; Financial sector challenges facing key emerging markets; and, monetary policy challenges faced by emerging markets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500.

ECO 640 The Economics of Organizations

For graduate students only. The Economics of Organizations uses the business-related tenets of economics to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. After introducing intermediate microeconomic theory, the course uses economic intuition to address cost issues ranging from outsourcing to the addition of new product lines, agency issues from explicit contract theory to the multi-task principle and team production, and imperfect competition issues ranging from Bertrand pricing to the assessment of Cournot strategic interactions. The international dimension is integrated throughout the course in establishing the competitive organizational form for the firm given the market in which it competes.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 500, MKT 500.

ECO 689 Contemporary Global Economic Issues

The course aims to provide business students with a broad overview of key topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The following aspects will be emphasized in the course: drivers of long-term economic growth and development; challenges posed by natural resource abundance; international business cycle fluctuations; cross-border interdependence and spillover; causes and consequences of global imbalances; and key aspects of international finance -  exchange rates, currency crises, and global monetary system. This course will emphasize applications - usage of basic frameworks of economics to analyze and understand real economic developments.

Credit Hours: 4

ECO 695 Special Topics in Economics

A course offered at the discretion of the ECO department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ECO 699 Independent Study in Economics

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in economics.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

EDL 601 Instructional Leadership

The primary focus of this course is instructional leadership as a collaborative practice of systemic improvement: the work of continuous inquiry, action and reflection enacted by distributed leadership trams, with the goal of improvement in the interdependent systems that support students’ academic success. Students will create instructional plans, explore professional development methods, generate a focus on student and professional learning in the school, identify faculty instructional proficiency needs, including standards-based content, research-based pedagogy, data analysis for instructional planning and improvement, and the use of instructional technology. Students will implement professional learning that enables faculty to deliver differentiated instruction and learn to engage faculty in effective individual and collaborative professional learning.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 602 Organizational Leadership, Safety and Decision-Making

This course will prepare students for the role they will hold as a school or district leader. Activities presented in the course will help students learn how to reflect on their practice of instructional leadership while also preparing them for obstacles they may face when dealing with organizational change. Students will learn the various leadership models to help them with rationale decision-making strategies while also realizing the proactive efforts to ensure a safe and secure learning environment.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 603 Human Resources: Recruitment, Development and Retention

Students will internalize the implications of the authority and total responsibility placed on school administrators. Emphasis will be placed on the students’ ability to recognize recruiting and selecting high performing teaching applicants and how to nurture and retain effective personnel through development and mentoring. In addition, students will demonstrate their ability to understand adult learning strategies to connect to professional growth plans. Further, students will display a thorough understanding of how to empower others to achieve personal, professional and organizational goals and how to set high expectations and standards to ensure that all students are engaged in active learning.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 604 Curriculum and Achievement

This course will provide an understanding of how curriculum is developed and implemented based on research and informed through current educational reform and policies. Students will explore strategies to align curriculum, instruction and monitoring student progress for diverse populations in inclusive, diverse, democratic and global environments. Students will also explore strategies to monitor student progress and promote continuous improvement to meet the cultural and developmental issues related to student achievement gaps. Students will analyze various conceptions of curriculum standards, reform movements in education, principles of curriculum planning, past and present curriculum trends and the interaction of curriculum with instruction generalized across educational settings. The correlation between curriculum and student achievement will be explored to understand the relationship between school leadership, pedagogy and student achievement.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 605 School Budgeting and Finance

The primary focus of this course is on the development of school and district budgets and budget forecasting, with consideration of the impact of local, state and federal funding laws on budget development processes. Students will 1) examine the cyclical nature of budget development and how school budgets are collaboratively constructed; 2) compare and contrast expenditures of like districts; 3) analyze a budget; 4) review various models for implementing a budget and project how the budget should be implemented and coordinated to align with the educational vision; and 5) forecast future fiscal needs based on variables such as enrollment trends, population projections, state reimbursements for student attendances and housing pattern changes.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 606 Educational Leadership Internship

The Educational Leadership Internship presents an opportunity for students to become immersed in the field of leadership practice and to appreciate the importance of instructional leadership in the creation of a positive and safe learning environment. The internship combines opportunities to study effective leadership firsthand, develop and practice instructional leadership skills and be mentored for a career as a school principal. The entire internship experience requires approximately 480 hours (12-15 hours per week over a full year) of supervised fieldwork in a public school. The combined internships are worth 3 credit hours and are earned 1 credit hour per semester (fall, spring and summer semesters). The internship is accompanied by a hybrid/blended (50% face-to-face, 50% online) seminar which is designed to meet on campus and online asynchronously throughout the internship experience. Permission from the participating school administrator is required.
Credit Hours: 1

EDL 607 School Law/Community Relations

This course will examine case law as it relates to schools, including impact and practice. Educational leaders will study how the legal process deals with controversial issues related to schooling that play a central role in our culture. Students will critically assess the impact and interactions of federal and state constitutions, statutes and regulations on the operation of schools. They will learn about procedural due process considerations and the constitutional rights of personnel and students balanced against the duties of the school. This course will also comprehensively examine the internal and external elements of school and community relations by exploring the knowledge, dispositions, and skills needed by educational leaders in order to understand and respond to diverse community systems, interests and needs. School and community relations include effective collaboration with families and community members, utilizing community resources to benefit students and families, and establishing solid partnerships with key school and community stakeholders.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 608 Data-Driven Leadership

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical applications of data-driven decision making and planning for educational leaders. Beginning with the a truncated review of purposes and applications of various statistical methods utilized in academic, legislative and district-level research, the course then acquaints candidates with various ways of framing data-based questions, interpreting data and designing action research studies.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 610 Communication and Technology for Leaders

This course offers a theoretical, conceptual and operational analysis of information systems used for decision making, communication and problem solving in learning organizations. An integral part of the course involves developing the technical and analytical skills necessary to manage school-based technologies and information systems, with an emphasis on those systems that are designed to make it possible for organizations to transform curricula delivery as well as knowledge-based systems. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the human dimensions of communication within information systems in which the organization exists.
Credit Hours: 3

EDL 612 Problem-Solving and Visionary Leadership

This course will provide an understanding of how visionary leadership collaboratively involves the school community in creating and sustaining shared school values, vision, mission and goals. Students will explore strategies, case studies and experiential activities focused on problem solving and visionary leadership.
Credit Hours: 3

EDU 200 Foundations of American Education

An introduction to the contemporary issues and trends in public education from historical, sociological and philosophical perspectives. Open to all students. Can be used to satisfy an education minor.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 206 Human Development and Learning

The course introduces the topic of human development, integrating basic concepts of physical, intellectual, cognitive, psychological, social and emotional development of children, youth and adults at each major life stage, adopting a developmental psychology perspective. Theoretical viewpoints and recent research are considered with respect to the practical application of psychosocial theory emphasizing the interaction of human development and learning. Open to all students.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 207 Philosophy of Education and Teacher Learner Relationships

Students will investigate primary source data for philosophical orientations to teaching that include progressivism, perennialism, essentialism, social reconstructivism and existentialism. Students will apply that data in the process of responding to contemporary teaching/learning scenarios and in developing their own teaching philosophy. Students will also explore teacher-learner relationships and their impact on the quality of learning encounters. Can be used to satisfy an education minor.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 211 Pre-Education Practicum

This course is designed to provide pre-education students with the opportunity to conduct careful and systematic field-based observations tied to coursework and to engage in seminar discussions regarding those experiences. Seminars will focus on the Danielson Framework and what the descriptors mean in practice. During the Pre-Education Practicum, students will complete eight essential research-based tasks required of those doing observations and fieldwork in school and classroom settings. Candidates will: 1) observe, 2) notice, 3) notate, 4) predict, 5) generate, 6) analyze, 7) critique and 8) reflect. Employing the use of these eight tasks to guide classroom observation efforts promotes the critical analysis of classroom life and facilitates the development of a realistic perspective of the realities of teaching. This is a pass/fail course.
Credit Hours: 2

EDU 212 Human Exceptionalities

This introductory-level course adopts a developmental psychology perspective with an emphasis on the new neuroscience of the exceptional brain. The course presents the types of disability in concert with the nature and needs of children and youth with disability. The course considers the intellectual, cognitive, psychological, developmental, physical, social, emotional and learning characteristics of children and youth with special needs, including gifted and talented children and youth. Children's literature is also used to explore the psychosocial aspects of disability. Can be used to satisfy the education minor.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 300 Teaching Language Arts in the Secondary Schools (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary English education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 302 Assessment and Continuous Improvement (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge of classroom assessment techniques needed to allow for continuous improvement for students and self. The course includes knowledge related to the creation of traditional and alternative testing techniques, the review of student assessment data, the assessment of teaching impact for reflecting on personal teaching experiences and the communication of student progress to stakeholders.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 305 Classroom Management and Critical Thinking (ESOL-infused course)

This course investigates theories and strategies enabling teachers to manage student behavior and solve classroom problems. Provides intervention and management techniques for teachers and teacher candidates using principles of applied behavior analysis. Examines frameworks for creating a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction and effective communication among members of the learning community. Areas of emphasis include structuring the classroom for success, planning for instruction, managing materials and equipment, and assessing and managing student and group behavior. The course emphasizes acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies that measure higher-order thinking skills and identifies strategies, materials and technologies that expand students' thinking abilities.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 306 Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed for the teacher candidate to understand the principles of scientifically based reading research as the foundation of comprehensive instruction that synchronizes and scaffolds each of the major components of the reading process toward student mastery. Teacher candidates will gain substantive knowledge of language structure and function and cognition for each of the five major components of the reading process, including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension and integration of major reading components. Students develop and analyze instructional strategies that promote understanding across all academic disciplines. At the completion of this course, teacher candidates will have a greater understanding of the reading process and will be able to apply this knowledge to maximize instructional effectiveness for students from varying academic backgrounds and diverse cultures. This course requires students to brainstorm, research, present information and engage in draft writing, revise writing and peer editing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 308 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary social studies education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 309 Practicum (with Seminar) I (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates the opportunity to actively spend time in age appropriate classrooms with experienced teachers. During this experience, students will work with small groups of students, teach at least two lessons, critique a video of themselves teaching, receive feedback from the classroom teacher on their teaching, interview teachers about their use of technology, observe students when they participate in specials (PE, music, etc).

Credit Hours: 1

EDU 310 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary biology education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 311 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (ESOL-infused course)

This is a specialized methods course for secondary mathematics education majors. Topics include teaching methods and processes, evaluation procedures and curriculum development specific to secondary schools. Involves students in teaching simulations. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 312 Communication and ESOL Applications

For elementary education majors. This course provides a framework for synthesizing the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement and the 11 ESOL competencies in order to prepare pre-professional teachers with effective linguistic and cultural classroom-based practices. The focus of this course is on ESOL methods for comprehensible instruction, ESOL materials and curriculum, and ESOL assessment procedures for English language learners (ELLs). The final exam serves as a comprehensive overview of the ESOL components infused in the education program. An ESOL field experience is required for all students (EDU 319).

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 315 Teaching Literature and Language Arts in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

An examination of the language arts, the cognitive and literacy development of children, methods of instruction in the communication processes, the needs of the diverse learner, and the integration of language arts across the curriculum. A focus is the use of children's literature in teaching by examining genres, student responses and a balanced literacy program.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 316 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

A comprehensive survey of the basic methods of teaching reading in the elementary school. Examines the methods, materials and basic skills of teaching reading, with a focus on skill development in the intermediate classroom. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 317 Diversity and Ethics (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to conduct investigations of ethics and learner diversity, including linguistic diversity with an emphasis on developing anti-bias strategies, curriculum and learning environments, as well as corresponding interaction between teacher and learner. The course provides research-based coverage of diversity and ethics issues while emphasizing contemporary topics such as creating a climate of openness, inquiry and support by practicing classroom strategies of acceptance, tolerance, resolution and mediation. Candidates will become proficient in the areas of diversity and ethics as specified in the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically-based research instructional practices to ensure positive impact on student learning in the classroom.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 318 Teaching Reading Through Diagnostic Assessment and Instruction (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for diagnosis and correction of mild to moderate reading difficulties with an emphasis on reading instruction guided by assessment. The physical, physiological, cognitive, language, emotional and socio-cultural correlates of reading disabilities are examined to help candidates understand the nature and causes of reading problems in grades K-6. Candidates will gain facility in the selection and use of formal and informal instruments for the early detection and correction of reading difficulties. The diagnostic-prescriptive model will be applied to help candidates acquire expertise in the analysis of children's reading diagnostic data and the implementation of developmentally appropriate instructional methods that address the needs of diverse student populations. Candidates will become proficient in planning and implementing reading instruction as specified in the Florida Reading Endorsement Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically based reading research instructional practices in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension to ensure positive impact on student learning in the elementary classroom. Field hours required (Practicum II).

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 319 ESOL Practicum (with Seminar) II

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to participate in more than 45 hours of ESOL field experience. Candidates will plan and implement ESOL-relevant instruction in one-to-one, small-group and large-group settings. This course introduces the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement in the following five content areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication and understanding, applied linguistics, and testing and evaluation of ESOL.

Credit Hours: 1

EDU 320 ESOL Observational Practicum

This course is designed to provide Professional Education Minors with the opportunity to conduct field-based observations in a secondary school and engage in seminar discussions regarding those experiences with a specific focus on English Language Learners (ELLs). During EDU 320 ESOL Observational Practicum, candidates will complete eight essential research-based tasks through observations and fieldwork in classroom settings. Candidates will 1) observe, 2) notice, 3) notate, 4) predict, 5) generate, 6) analyze, 7) critique, and 8) reflect. The eight (8) tasks will guide classroom observations and critical analysis of classroom life and facilitate the development of a realistic perspective of teaching.
Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

EDU 358

EDU 325 Secondary Classroom Assessment

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge of classroom assessment techniques needed to allow for continuous improvement for students and self.  The course specifically includes knowledge related to the creation of traditional and alternative testing techniques, the review of student assessment data, the assessment of teaching impact for reflecting on personal teaching experiences and the communication of student progress to stakeholders. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 329 Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Elementary School

Involves study and practice in elementary physical education methods. Examines and evaluates subject matter, methods and source materials for health programs. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program; intended major in physical education.

EDU 334 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

This course provides elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for teaching social studies in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, implementing, and evaluating social studies instruction as specified in the Competencies and Skills Required for Teacher Certification in Florida: Elementary Education for Social Studies. Candidates will acquire knowledge of how to develop and implement scientifically-based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: history, geography, government and civics, economics, and assessment in social studies. Field hours required.
Credit Hours: 3

EDU 335 Secondary Classroom Management

This course investigates theories and strategies enabling secondary teachers to manage student behavior and solve classroom problems.  Provides intervention and management techniques for teachers and teacher candidates using principles of applied behavior analysis at the secondary level.  Examines frameworks for creating a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction and effective communication among members of the learning community in the 6-12 classroom.  Areas of emphasis include structuring the classroom for success, planning for instruction, managing materials and equipment, and assessing and managing secondary student and group behavior.  The course emphasizes acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies that measure higher order thinking skills in the 6-12 classroom and students’ thinking abilities.  This course requires students to brainstorm, free-write, research, draft writing, revise writing, present information, and peer-edit. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

EDU 336 Instructional Laboratory I

Instructional Laboratory I will offer students the chance to provide learning experiences in specialized contemporary and education-related topics such as social-emotional learning, growth mindset, differentiation, data-led instruction, backward design, inclusive instruction, instructional leadership, exploratory practice, innovation, and content professional development. Instructional Laboratory I provides students with the opportunity to explore contemporary subject matter in education more thoroughly than is possible in a formal class.
Credit Hours: 1

EDU 345 Methods of Secondary Instruction

The Methods of Secondary Instruction course discusses how to teach effectively in today’s secondary schools.  This course develops an understanding of various learning modes, learning styles, multiple intelligence, questioning techniques, and other instructional strategies to engage students and be effective in today’s secondary school classroom.  This course demonstrates how to use effective lesson plan design as well as various assessment techniques.  The course is designed to provide teacher education candidates with an opportunity to study, reflect, question, become knowledgeable about, and develop skills in instructional methods while applying and practicing these methods in a collaborative and constructive setting.  Major topics include characteristics of effective and intentional teaching; student diversity, social justice and how understanding students influences learning; planning for instruction; creating effective lessons using a variety of approaches & technologies; classroom management; assessment of student learning; and professional development. For secondary education majors only.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 354 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages I-Secondary (TESOL I)

Required for all secondary majors, this ESOL methods course introduces the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement in the following five content areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication and understanding, applied linguistics, and testing and evaluation of ESOL. The final exam serves as a comprehensive overview of the ESOL components infused in the education program. An ESOL field experience is required for all students (EDU 319).

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 358 Understanding TESOL

This survey course introduces the 5 Florida ESOL Domains and the 12 ESOL Performance Standards in the following five content areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication and understanding, applied linguistics, testing and evaluation of ESOL. This course will enable the participant to understand and respond to the diverse linguistic, cultural, and educational needs of English Language Learners (ELL) in secondary 6-12 content area classes.
Credit Hours: 3

Corequisites

EDU 320

EDU 377 Elementary Physical Education Curriculum and Practicum

This course provides an in-depth coverage of the various curricular models and developmentally appropriate teaching methods common at the elementary level in physical education. Students will be placed at a school to observe and teach physical education under the supervision of a licensed physical education teacher. Field study required.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 380 Professional Development Clinical

This course is a clinical tutorial-based course that will provide students with additional, individualized and alternative curricula knowledge, skills and experiences to further develop the performance of teacher education candidates within the department of education.

Credit Hours: 0-3

EDU 400 Teaching Science and Social Studies in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

This writing-intensive course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for the teaching of science and social studies content in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, writing, implementing and evaluating science and social studies instruction as specified in the Florida Elementary Education Subject Area Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to write and implement scientifically based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: history; geography; government and civics; economics; assessment in science and social studies; knowledge of matter; knowledge of forces, motion and energy; knowledge of Earth and space science; knowledge of life science; knowledge of the nature of science; and knowledge of the relationship of science and technology. In order to improve their writing skills, class participants will spend time with students in school and teach them how to write social science-based and science-based texts. Field hours required. This course requires students to brainstorm, free-write, research, rewrite, present information and peer-edit. A significant aspect of this course is teaching students about writing and learning through teaching writing, as well as learning through writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 402 Teaching Art, Music and PE in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

A specialized elementary music, art and physical education methods course. Features demonstrations with class participation. Implements a variety of strategies that facilitate active learning with music, art, movement and drama.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 403 Technology in Education II (ESOL-infused course)

The focus of this course is the design, development and evaluation of learning experiences using the Internet. Instructional design and development applied to multimedia instruction. Instructional strategies for higher-order learning, including problem solving. Alternative design and development methodologies. Essential multimedia production tools and techniques. Students form design and development teams to create an engaging online-based learning experience. Students create and evaluate learning activities using the Web; creation of personal learning portal.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 408 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

This course is designed to provide elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for the teaching of mathematics content in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, implementing and evaluating mathematics instruction as specified in the Florida Elementary Education Subject Area Competencies. Thus they will acquire knowledge of how to implement scientifically based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: knowledge of numbers and operations, knowledge of geometry and measurement, knowledge of algebra, knowledge of data analysis, and knowledge of instruction and assessment in mathematics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 409 Practicum (with Seminar) III

Pre-internship for elementary education and secondary education majors. An intensive study involving the application of theoretical, philosophical and pedagogical principals for grades K-12. Required is a 120-hour minimum field experience for which extensive, fully planned lessons are developed and implemented in the classroom. Lectures and seminars about curriculum and instruction issues are presented at the University. Field experience placements are assigned by the Department of Education.

Credit Hours: 2-4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 410 Final Internship Seminar IV

A course taken concurrently with Teaching Practicum IV: Final Internship. Topics include reflective inquiry, classroom management, the diverse classroom, lesson and unit planning, ethics and continued professional growth. Students will develop a professional portfolio as part of their evaluation.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Completion of prior required course work.

Corequisites

EDU 413

EDU 413 Final Internship Practicum IV

A full semester of 14 weeks provides practical application and practice in a classroom under the direction of a certified teacher. Seminars and lectures on campus are required throughout the semester. The internship is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Students enrolling are advised that the internship is a full-time endeavor. Interns are advised against outside employment and may not enroll in additional courses concurrently without permission of the Clinical Education Committee.

Credit Hours: 10

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior required course work.

Corequisites

EDU 410

EDU 416 Final Internship International Practicum

Taken concurrently with EDU 413 Practicum IV: Final Internship and EDU 410. Topics include reflective inquiry, classroom management, the diverse classroom, lesson and unit planning, ethics, and continued professional growth. Upon successful completion of a ten week internship (EDU 413), the remaining weeks of the internship will be completed in Northern Ireland. Seminars and lectures on campus are required throughout the first seven semester weeks. The internship is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 0-2

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior course work.

Corequisites

EDU 410

EDU 418 Reading Practicum

This is a practicum course taken in conjunction with EDU 413 Final Internship Practicum IV for elementary education majors.  Programs seeking the Reading Endorsement through the Florida Department of Education are required to include a reading practicum as part of the final capstone teaching experience.  Through this culminating practicum, teacher candidates will demonstrate knowledge of the components of reading, as well as assessment and data analysis, to implement a comprehensive research-based reading plan of instruction from all students. Teacher candidates will engage in the systematic problem solving process.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Completion of all prior required course work.

EDU 425 Teaching Middle School and Secondary Physical Education

A study and practice in methods pertinent to middle school and secondary physical education. Field hours required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Admission to teacher education program.

EDU 434 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (ESOL-infused course)

This course provides elementary education teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for teaching science in the elementary school curriculum. Candidates will become proficient in planning, implementing, and evaluating science instruction as specified in the Competencies and Skills Required for Teacher Certification in Florida: Elementary Education for Science. Candidates will acquire knowledge of how to develop and implement scientifically-based instructional practices in the following curricular areas: knowledge of matter, knowledge of forces, motion, and energy, knowledge of Earth and space science, knowledge of life science, and knowledge of the nature of science and knowledge of the relationship of science and technology. Field hours required.
Credit Hours: 3

EDU 436 Instructional Laboratory II

Instructional Laboratory II will place teachers in position to understand the critical role they play in creating a climate of continuous, systemic improvement in schools through the establishment of professional learning communities and the concurrent development of teacher leadership AND their own professional learning. Participants will participate in mock professional learning communities while engaging in curriculum content learning, teacher leadership, school effectiveness, and site-based accountability. Knowledge gained in the university classroom will be applied in site-based activities, including problem-based learning activities, case studies, and/or exploratory enquiry. Students will develop a product representing their growth in understanding of teaching, learning and development.
Credit Hours: 1

EDU 450 Independent Study in Education

The course consists of directed readings and research projects on a topic of interest to the student. Content covered must be different from that included in current courses in the major. Independent studies may be taken with any full-time professor in education programs and require consent of the department chair. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EDU 481 Comprehensive Subject Area Competency and Skills (SACS)

This course is a capstone exam that provides a framework for students to synthesize the subject area competencies and skills (SACS). A final comprehensive exam serves as an overview of subject area components infused in the education program.

Credit Hours: 0

EDU 489 Special Topics in Education

Provides in-service and teachers in training with fully accredited education coursework that satisfies Florida Department of Education certification and continuing education certification requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EDU 601 Curriculum Theory

This course introduces students to the study of curriculum theory. Students explore the nature of curriculum theory, differentiate curriculum theory from curriculum planning, place the study of curriculum theory within the larger history of the American school curriculum, and explore a variety of models of curriculum theory including alternative models.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 605 Professional Ethics, School Law, Safety and Classroom Management

For graduate students only. This course provides a reflective look at current research and a variety of teaching strategies for the diverse classroom with a particular emphasis on adolescent behaviors in the classroom context and effective options for classroom management. The Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession in Florida will be discussed. This practical view of life in the middle and secondary classroom will feature procedures for school safety and salient information on school law.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 608 Cross-Cultural Diversity

This course is designed for students and teachers who want to explore frameworks, materials and strategies that will help them translate the rationale for diversity education into effective educational practice with learners of any age, level or background. Accordingly, the course focuses on approaches to curriculum consonant with a diverse perspective.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 610 Instructional Methods

For graduate students only. This course presents mathematics instruction or science instruction as one multifaceted and dynamic experiential learning module that responds to real-world problems and issues. Emphasis is on strategies for exploring mathematics or science in local, state, national and international community environments. Teacher candidates whose emphasis is mathematics 6-12 or middle grades mathematics 5-9 are enrolled in the section co-taught by mathematics and education faculty. Teacher candidates whose emphasis is biology 6-12, chemistry 6-12, physics 6-12 or middle grades science 5-9 are enrolled in the section co-taught by science faculty and education faculty.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 611 Human Development and Social Dimensions of Learning

For graduate students only. This course addresses all social dimensions of learning, including decisions regarding social aspects of classrooms, schools and other types of learning environments that teachers face, and the powerful impact these decisions have on educational climate. Students will develop an understanding of the influence of social factors on teaching and learning, and that social dimensions impact equal access, school progress and performance, and completion of academic programs.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 612 Pedagogy and Innovation in Education: Models in Teaching

Technology and innovation are key resources for education and school reform initiatives. They not only provide an avenue to access 21st-century learning and teaching practices, but also define and shape the way schools operate. Managed properly, technological innovations are a primary source of competitive advantage for school systems; they also enhance the educational well-being of a nation and anchor its global know-how. The challenge of how best to manage technology and innovation has expanded beyond its traditional home in departments like instructional technology or media centers, to the point where it now permeates nearly every aspect of teaching and learning in modern schools. Schools are increasingly turning to technological innovations to enable new forums of engaging with knowledge; to change the way we think of teacher-learner roles; to improve quality and school/home/community communication patterns; and to create and retain student motivation. In addition, teachers now face an accelerating pace of innovation in the technologies supporting and changing the processes involved in school management, assessment and instruction. This course will explore the strategic role of technology and innovation in the survival and success of schools and schooling. The course will have a strong emphasis on state-of-the-art technologies in the selection of case examples.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 613 Research in Education

This course is an introduction to epistemology and historical, experimental, descriptive and survey research as it relates to seeking solutions to problems within the field of education. Classic educational research, research techniques, the analysis of research results and the uses of research are explored. This course guides classroom teachers through the process of reviewing, evaluating, conducting and disseminating educational research, and is designed to help teachers evaluate research findings and their applications to classroom practice.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 616 Social Change and School Reform

This course provides a reflective (and reflexive) overview of the educational policy-making process at local, state and national levels, and of the ethical principles that can influence such policy making.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 617 Technology for Education and Leadership

Effectively using technology across all functions of a school system is, in itself, significant systemic reform. There is a wealth of evidence showing that facilitating change in schools, and especially maintaining that change, depends heavily on capable leadership. It is imperative, therefore, that we in higher education focus on leadership for technology in schools if we are to optimize its benefits in learning, teaching and school operations.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 619 Children's Literature in the Reading Program

This graduate level course is designed to provide candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for effectively integrating children's literature into a balanced reading program. Course content provides a survey of literature for children from preschool through grade 6 with an emphasis on applying the principles of valuation to selected books from a wide variety of genres. Candidates will explore the positive correlation between children's literature and reading achievement and will learn how to apply their knowledge of literature to help children grow in their language and reading abilities.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 621 Exceptional Student Learning: Inclusive Classrooms

This course traces the historical development of special education and inclusive classrooms through landmark legislation and litigation, parent advocacy and national economic and social needs. The provisions of federal and state special education mandates, judicial interpretations and Florida state guidelines regulating the delivery of educational services to persons with handicaps also will be addressed.

Credit Hours: 1 or 3

EDU 622 Applied Philosophy for Curricular Design and Implementation

This course is an introduction to the philosophical field of epistemology and how it applies to education and learning. While the course is strongly grounded in philosophy, an emphasis will be placed on the application and relationship of epistemology to students, teachers and learning.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 624 Public School Law and Professional Ethics

This course examines the numerous school law and legal issues that affect the public school system. Educators will become knowledgeable about the various social and political issues that are manifested in school systems. It will provide educators with a general understanding of how various legal issues have been decided. Specific legal principles relating to church/state issues, tort liability, teachers’ responsibilities, students’ rights, and administrative concerns such as contracts and collective bargaining will be covered. Students will be required to apply these legal principles to analyze actual case scenarios. Topics included: (1) Students: Rights and responsibilities; discipline; First Amendment issues; special education issues; general education issues. (2) School personnel/employees: Discipline; hiring, termination, discharge; certified, non-certified and administrators; union issues. (3) Board of education/administration: School finances; board elections; role of the board; role of the administration; procurement issues; bond issues; construction issues. (4) State Department of Education: Role of FLDOE. The course will review federal and state law decisions which effect the daily operations of the Florida public schools.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 626 Socio-Emotional Learning and Teaching

This course is designed to examine social emotional learning and teaching and to explore how pro-social centered education impacts various aspects of school climate and culture. In this course students will examine the who, what, where, why and how of the significance of emotions and social skills and why teaching and learning these skills matters profoundly. The course will examine the following questions about pro-social education initiatives: Can students be taught pro-social behaviors, such as, being kinder to one another? How would teachers implement teaching pro-social skills in the classroom? Would such instruction "stick"? Influence behavior? Rub off on teachers? What might a pro-social education program look like? Can such instruction be formalized without becoming dogmatic or political? How does social context play into social and emotional learning? Does explicit instruction in pro-social behavior positively affect the behavior of children? How might such outcomes be measured? Is there a positive correlation between pro-social behavior and overall achievement in schools where traits like kindness and empathy are explicitly taught? Can such a program be replicated?

Credit Hours: 2-4

EDU 635 Assessment in the Secondary School Curriculum

For graduate students only. This course is a study of secondary school curriculum and instruction as a specialized part of the total schooling system. The study of this curriculum is intended to examine historical, societal and organizational issues with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of curricular content and on the nature of the students being served in middle and secondary schools.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 640 Teaching English as a Second Language: TESOL

This course provides an overview of the five areas pertinent to teaching English language learners (ELLs) in order to a) promote an understanding of first and second language acquisition processes; b) facilitate the development of culturally and linguistically appropriate instructional and assessment skills; and c) present effective means for modifying curricula. The five areas are 1) applied linguistics and second language acquisition; 2) cross-cultural communication and understanding; 3) methods in teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESOL); 4) curriculum and materials development; and 5) testing and evaluation of ESOL. This course meets the 60-hour ESOL education requirement for Category II teachers and administrators as determined by the Florida Department of Education.

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 670 Special Topics in Education

Credit Hours: 3

EDU 680 Professional Development Clinical

This is a clinical tutorial-based course that will provide students with additional, individualized and alternative curricula knowledge, skills and experiences to further develop the performance of teacher education candidates within the department of education.

Credit Hours: 0-3

EDU 682 Grant Writing in Education

Developing effective grant writing skills is essential to acquiring competitive funding from government agencies and private foundations. Writing a successful grant proposal is a blend of art and science. It requires content knowledge, writing proficiency, strong research skills, creativity, organizational ability, patience and a great deal of luck. This course will provide students with the background necessary to develop a competitive funding proposal endeavor.

Credit Hours: 4

EDU 695 Independent Study in Education

The course consists of directed readings and research projects on a topic of interest to the student. Content covered must be different from that included in current courses in the major. Independent studies may be taken with any full-time professor in education programs and require consent of the department chair. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

Credit Hours: 1-4

EMBA 801 Personal Branding I: Developing Communication and Interpersonal Skills

This course is designed to sharpen communication and interpersonal skills through class activities, writing, presentations and simulations. It focuses on perfecting speaking, writing, visual and interpersonal communication skills necessary for students' careers as business leaders.
Credit Hours: 2

EMBA 802 Developing Cross-cultural Competencies and Career Management Strategies

This course examines the challenges associated with managing business enterprises whose operations stretch across national boundaries. Through extensive readings and case analyses, students obtain a fundamental understanding of the strategic, operational and behavioral aspects of managing across cultures. Students will further develop their leadership skills and interpersonal skills and will work with community leaders to advance their personal brand and marketability. Through a variety of career development experiences students will learn critical components involved in strategic career management and progression including self-assessment, creating and managing one’s professional brand, personal marketability, business communication, networking and leveraging available job-search and internship resources. (prerequisites: all courses in the EMBA program, except EMBA 850 and EMBA 855)

Credit Hours: 2

EMBA 803 Accounting for Managers

This is a basic financial accounting course for managers who do not have an accounting background.  The course is aimed at teaching the fundamentals of creating, reading, and interpreting financial accounting statements as prepared under US GAAP.
Credit Hours: 1

EMBA 804 Analytics for Managers

This course is a review of basic data analytics concepts essential for decision modeling and analysis in business environments.  It is designed to prepare students for taking EMBA 825, Modeling and Analysis for Executive Decision Making.  Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.  The course is divided into four modules, each of which is succeeded by an on-line post-test.  Students will be able to keep taking these tests for one week after the conclusion of the course.  We use lectures, videos, exercises and appropriate software to illustrate all concepts.
Credit Hours: 1

EMBA 805 Managing Innovation Strategically

This course focuses on the role of innovation in the 21st-century organization. It addresses the need for a systematic approach to building innovation capabilities and the challenges of integrating the many facets of innovation management. Leading innovators and building innovative organizations are covered from a theoretical and applied approach. Topics addressed include fundamental theories of innovation, developing innovation strategy, innovation as a business process, the role of the innovation context including leadership and organization, culture and values, people and skills, and processes and tools, and assessing and improving innovation performance. Both classroom and alternative instructional methods may be employed.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 806 Finance for Managers

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the organization and practices of corporate finance, and a basic understanding of the quantitative tools used by financial managers with relevant applications.
Credit Hours: 1

EMBA 807 Economics for Managers

This course is a foundational economics course for managers who either do not have a formal economics background, or have not studied economics for several years. The course is designed to rapidly acquaint, or re-acquaint, the student with foundational economic concepts and tools, and provide an introduction to the “economic way of thinking”.
Credit Hours: 1

EMBA 810 Dynamic Leadership

This course examines leadership, which is defined as "the ability to influence others in the absence of positional power," through interactive, experiential learning. Students develop an understanding of leadership and gain insight into their own personal leadership styles. The course addresses group dynamics, team building, problem solving, conflict resolution, the interrelationship of trust and power, and ethical behavior in the workplace. Assignments and topics will be coordinated with EMBA 805, which is offered during the same semester.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 820 Accounting for Strategic Management

This course provides a pragmatic study of selected financial and management accounting concepts, methods and practices relating to financial analysis, cost assignment, cost management, performance management and decision analysis. The central focus of this course is how accounting information helps managers identify strategies and make decisions to produce a sustainable competitive advantage.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 825 Modeling and Analysis for Executive Decision Making

This course provides an overview of statistical and mathematical models for effective decision making. Tools used daily by managers, business analysts and consultants are utilized to solve problems in operations, finance, accounting, marketing, human resources, policy making, economics, etc. Topics include regression analysis, statistical process control, linear optimization, time-series forecasting and decision making under uncertainty and risk. The course is taught using lectures, cases and appropriate software packages.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 830 Strategic Information Systems Management

Modern organizations face rapidly changing environments and require information systems that can quickly adapt to support business operations. Given rapidly evolving information technologies, many organizations struggle with obtaining strategic benefits from information systems. This course explores contemporary issues related to the strategic use of information systems and technology to manage and enhance organizational operations. Topics such as the value of IT investments, IT-business alignment, enterprise systems/ERP, operational analytics, and cybersecurity are covered in a discussion-oriented and case-based approach to prepare business leaders to extract strategic value from investments in information systems.
Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 835 Marketing Strategy and Value Creation

Introduces students to strategic decision-making tools for planning, promoting, pricing and distributing products and services to targeted markets, with a goal of delivering high levels of customer value. Strategic marketing management techniques that lead toward the formation of exceptional firms are applied with the use of analytical practices. The course will use current events readings, cases, simulations, discussions and formal strategic plans.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 840 Economics for Business Leaders

The goal of the course is to provide business leaders with an economic framework for making decisions. The course begins by exploring the efficiency of the market-based system and an examination of how repugnance, price controls and taxation affect that system. We examine why business institutions exist and how their boundaries are determined; explore how design architecture influences individual decision making; and study how incentives and monitoring alter employee behavior. Models for optimally pricing in commodity markets, entrepreneurial markets and markets with dominant rivals are developed. Lastly, tools for mitigating systemic risk within financial institutions are investigated.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 845 Financial Management and Strategy

This course focuses on the core concepts of financial decision making: maximizing wealth, cash flow, net present value and the existence of risk and return tradeoffs in most corporate decisions. The course also explores the implications of various financial strategies within the dynamic global financial environment. Accounting concepts learned in EMBA 820 are applied using models that are realistic and robust. Students compute prices and returns on corporate securities and the weighted average cost of capital for a firm and evaluate long term capital investment projects using capital budgeting techniques. Students also learn about capital structure theory and financing strategies firms choose to optimize their mix of debt and equity.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 850 Global Strategic Management I

This course asks the student to adopt a strategic perspective for the entire organization, with all its highly interdependent elements and dimensions, as it operates within a dynamic, global environment. The course lays the foundation for the international travel course and requires the application of conceptual models, tools and skills unique to the practice of strategic leadership and competitive global business strategies. Through readings and case studies, students will apply the concepts, tools and skills they have gained from previous coursework to real-world organizational problems, and begin preparations for the International Experience course project.

Credit Hours: 4

EMBA 855 Global Strategic Management II

This course is integrated with EMBA 850. Students are required to apply research skills in gathering data from a broad range of sources in order to develop quality external and internal environmental analyses. The analyses are tailored to a client and targeted country. The course includes 9- or 10-day travel study component, in addition to scheduled class meetings.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 601 Introduction to Instructional Design

This course introduces participants to the systems approach to instructional design. The major components of instructional development models will be presented. This course provides introductory information and application of skills and techniques necessary in the analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of instruction (often referred to as the ADDIE framework). This course will consider these issues at both the curriculum (macro) and lesson (micro) level.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 602 Theories of Learning and Cognition for Instruction

The course is designed to provide you with the distinctions and concepts necessary to apply various theories of learning, cognition and instruction to traditional and distance learning settings. These theories are tools that educators, administrators, instructors, counselors, parents and many others can use to make their endeavors more productive and useful. This course will introduce and illustrate the proper use of these tools in providing insights into defining and solving problems. The emphasis will always be on the use of these theories to solve realistic and relevant problems drawn from your own personal experience or from cases we will study.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 603 Inquiry and Measurement

This is a foundational course that addresses inquiry and measurement concepts at a level appropriate for master’s degree students. Through this course students will learn concepts and acquire skills that will help them make data-based decisions related to learning and human performance.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 605 Introduction to Distance Learning

This course examines the uses of distance learning in education and training environments as distance systems are increasingly used for teaching and learning. Distance education will be investigated as an instructional method in terms of delivery, development and implementation. Students will design a distributed learning system that uses emerging technologies that support distance delivery.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 606 Design of Online Collaborative Learning

In this course students will learn, explore, and apply some of the latest web technologies, research findings, principles, and instructional design techniques to design and develop collaborative learning activities and assignments in on-line environments.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 607 Introduction to Instructional Games and Simulations

This course addresses instructional games and simulation concepts at a level appropriate for master’s students. This course offers theoretical concepts and an introduction to the design, production, utilization, and evaluation of educational games and simulations. Students will design an educational game and/or an educational simulation related to learning and human performance.
Credit Hours: 4

EME 610 Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology

This course is designed for students who intend to become professionals in the field of instructional design and technology. Professionals in any field should be able to do more than just perform the skills associated with it; they should also know something about the field’s history, its current status and the trends and issues likely to impact it. The purpose of this course is to help you become conversant in these areas. This course may be offered face-to-face or in hybrid mode.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 611 Principles of Learner Motivation

This course focuses on theories and concepts of human motivation. Students explore what motivates students to learn, and examine strategies, techniques and interventions that promote and sustain learner motivation. This course may be offered face-to-face or in hybrid mode.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 612 Media for Instruction

This course covers different forms of media used for instruction, about how they can be produced and disseminated, and about the technologies that help and hinder the process of understanding. This course will explore how media, text, and technology intersect and will benefit students who anticipate authoring or sharing instructional media and texts as well as those who anticipate using or managing materials authored by others in an instructional context. We will focus on issues related to the open learning movement, through which technology is used to make instructional media and texts available to a wide audience. This course is delivered in hybrid mode.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 613 Open Learning Environments in the 21st Century

The field of educational technology has been heavily impacted by this new reality; the promise of open source and the reverberations of open content have forced colleges and universities to reconsider the ways in which they invest in technology for education. Whereas openness is a new business model, bringing with it new fears and new opportunities, it is also a chance for faculty to take their work to a new audience. Open education allow for innovation in how educators prepare to teach, how learners negotiate knowledge from the information they are encountering, and how courses can have an impact on the broader field of study. To break open the practice of open education and what it means moving into the 21st century, concepts of Openness as Transparent Practice, Open Curricula, Open Learners and Open Accreditation shall be deconstructed.

Credit Hours: 3

EME 620 Introduction to Systematic Instructional Design

The purpose of this course is to enable students to employ systematic instructional design procedures. As a result, students who successfully complete this course should be able to design a unit of instruction by using systematic instructional design procedures. The focus of this course is the application of instructional design principles to create instructional content that can be delivered to a target group of learners.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 630 Development of Multimedia Instruction

Development of Multimedia Instruction is a course for students who are already familiar with basic instructional systems design principles and who are prepared to practice them in a Web-based environment. The course focuses on the design, development, implementation/distribution and assessment of multimedia-based learning experiences.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 640 Introduction to Program Evaluation

This course introduces the conceptual issues and practical guidelines for conducting a program evaluation. This course will define and discuss the concepts and explore the theoretical basis of the diverse models and alternative approaches to program evaluation.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 641 Management of Instructional Development

This course is designed to help students understand and comprehend project management principles, while engaging in the practice of project management. In this course students will be provided the appropriate scaffolding and instruction in order to gain the basic skills necessary to successfully lead a project team.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 642 Management of Change

This course is designed for students to be able to introduce an instructional or non-instructional change initiative in an organizational environment and plan implementing that change and monitoring its progress based on their understanding of the systemic functions of the organization. These activities will take place in the context of human performance technology and with the purpose of improving organizational performance based on a systemic analysis of the organization. This course may be delivered in hybrid or online mode.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 644 Performance Systems Analysis

This course is designed to provide the foundational information and activities to develop the skills necessary to be successful in completing performance systems analysis in a variety of settings. While the class will focus on a narrow domain, the skills learned in the course can be applied in a variety of domains.

Credit Hours: 4

EME 650 Field Internship in Instructional Design and Technology

This field internship is designed to provide on-the-job experience in developing instructional design and technology competencies. Students will apply the skills and knowledge learned during their instructional design and technology program to a real-world workplace.

Credit Hours: 0

EME 660 Seminar in Instructional Design

Discuss advanced topics in instructional design (ID), such as new ID models and innovative approaches to ID research. Invited specialists present lectures and lead discussions on current topics and projects. The student will discuss and contribute to each of these topics.

Credit Hours: 2

EME 661 Advanced Seminar in Instructional Design

Discuss advanced topics in instructional design (ID), such as new ID models and innovative approaches to ID research. Invited specialists present lectures and lead discussion on current topics and projects. The students will discuss and contribute to each of these topics. Additionally, this course will cover ethics, contract negotiations, professional development, networking, stakeholder interactions, interviewing skills, instructional development and advanced presentation skills. This course will require the completion of a field internship and/or an advanced instructional design project for a field-based stakeholder as well as a comprehensive exam (professional portfolio).

Credit Hours: 2

ENG 205 Advanced English Grammar

Explores attitudes toward language and examines the way English works: its history, its regional and social varieties and its grammar. Includes a thorough review of the conventions of usage governing standard American written English. Satisfies a requirement for the secondary English education major.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

ENG 260 Topics in English

An investigation of topics in English. May include issues in rhetoric, composition, English language, digital humanities, disability studies or other topics not covered by the core curriculum. May be repeated for credit if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (W)

ENG 305 Research and Writing in the Discipline

This advanced composition course introduces students to scholarly writing in the humanities. Students will study journal articles as models of professional communication in the field. Students will also practice using discipline-specific resources, such as archives, bibliographies, and databases. Writing assignments will include a variety of exploratory research projects, including a literature review.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)(W)

Prerequisites

LIT 120, AWR 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 330 Language and Rhetoric

This course explores socio-linguistic, -historical, and -political dimensions of the English language by examining how both written and spoken discourse function as sequences of signs and symbols, as markers of community membership, as means of persuasion, and as sources of knowledge and power. Students will be introduced to theoretical and empirical studies of how language evolves and is employed effectively in various cultural contexts, with attention given to the analysis of literary and non-literary texts, as well as everyday social interactions. 
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

ENG 305, AWR 101, and AWR 201

ENG 343 Approaches to TESOL and Teaching Second and Foreign Languages

This course focuses on methods and approaches to teaching second and foreign languages. It incorporates theories of second/foreign language teaching and learning as well as essential concepts from applied linguistics. This course is intended for non-education majors who may pursue graduate studies in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), applied linguistics or foreign languages, or for students who may have interest in teaching/tutoring English to non-native speakers in the U.S. or abroad.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 370 Printing, Publishing and Book Arts

The primary aims of the class are to introduce students to the aesthetic, cultural and material dimensions of the reading experience, to enhance their understanding of how physical and visual presentations shape a reader's perceptions, and to introduce the craft and art of the physical book.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201.

ENG 443 The Supervised Practicum in TESOL

Students will be observing, tutoring and/or teaching English as a second language at a local language school. Taken as an independent study, this is the final course required to complete the TESOL Certificate. (This course is not to be confused with Florida State Teacher Certification offered by the Education department. There is no connection between the two programs.) A TESOL Certificate is a minimum requirement to teach English internationally and at certain locations in the U.S.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENG 205 and ENG 343

ENG 490 English Studies: Career Internship for English Majors

Open only to juniors and seniors. Internship to acquaint English majors with careers and professions and to show them how their special skills can be used in these environments. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credit hours, 4 of which may count toward the English major. Students must apply for the internship one semester in advance. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-10

Prerequisites

3.0 or higher GPA and consent of faculty advisor and department chair.

ENG 491 Senior Portfolio

The senior portfolio course is required for all English and Writing majors in the last semester of their senior year. The course assesses student attainment of stated outcomes and offers preparation for career development, including employment or graduate and professional schools.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior status, final year.

ENS 112 Environmental Science

An interdisciplinary study concerned with the historical, ecological, social, political and economic ramifications of the global environmental crisis. Addresses issues such as demographics, energy, pollution, natural resources and environmental policy. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NS)

ENS 113 Environmental Science Study Abroad

An interdisciplinary study concerned with the historical, ecological, social, political and economic ramifications of the global environmental crisis. Addresses issues such as demographics, energy, pollution, natural resources and environmental policy. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. ENS 113 is a study abroad course requiring international travel.
Credit Hours: 2-4
(IG) (NS)

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

ENS 113A Environmental Science Study Abroad Travel

An interdisciplinary study concerned with the historical, ecological, social, political and economic ramifications of the global environmental crisis. Addresses issues such as demographics, energy, pollution, natural resources and environmental policy. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. ENS 113A is a study abroad course requiring international travel.
Credit Hours: 2-4
(IG) (NS)

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

ENS 122 Global Sustainability

This course examines how humans utilize resources in a variety of subject areas and how resources are or could be consumed in a sustainable manner. Topics covered include: energy production, agriculture, harvesting, transportation, biodiversity, and ecological services. These subjects will be discussed from social, cultural, political, ecological, and economic perspectives with an emphasis on comparative sustainability between different locations on the planet. This course requires two weeks of international travel after the semester.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NS)

ENS 132 Biogeography and Biomes

Explores the question, "How did species of plants and animals end up where they are?" The course focuses on the ways that millions of years of geological, oceanographic and climatic processes have directed the evolution of the earth's inhabitants. Topics include the general features of the earth's major biomes, the unique biotic features of the earth's major geographic regions, and the ways in which the study of biogeography has played an important role in the history of science. This course also examines the ways that our own species has been affected by, and continues to influence, the distribution of the planet's species. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NS)

ENS 137 Sustainability in Cities

An experiential learning course focused on sustainability issues and solutions in urban areas around the world. Main topics include water, waste, energy, transportation and food. Includes cross-cultural comparison of lifestyles and resource usage, and site visits to relevant local facilities are included. Satisfies general distribution requirements. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience but is not applicable toward a biology or marine science major or minor. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(IG) (NS)

ENS 150 Physical Geology

A broad survey of the geological processes at work on and within the earth. Topics include the origin and composition of rocks, as well as the origin, location and characteristics of volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain belts, within the framework of plate tectonics. Also covers the modification of the earth's surface by wind, rivers, glaciers, groundwater, waves and currents, and the evolution of continents and ocean basins. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

Prerequisites

ENS 150L

Corequisites

MAR 150L

ENS 235 Geographic Information Systems

Teaches students the applications of geographic information systems technology to a variety of biological issues including delimiting species and habitat distribution, identifying landscape-level relationships between abiotic and biotic factors and their spatial effects on populations; identifying potential effects of human activity on natural areas and populations; and developing management and regulatory policies including defining potential protected areas.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (SS) (Category III)

ENS 242 Environmental Science and Policy

Covers many of the most threatening environmental problems facing society. When possible, these issues are discussed at local, national and global levels to demonstrate how policy and cultural differences impact the various threats to the environment and to the human population. Environmental threats are discussed both in the context of their impact on natural ecosystems and their potential threat to human health and economic growth.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG) (NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

BIO 242L

ENS 242L Environmental Science and Policy Discussion

Covers many of the most threatening environmental problems facing society. When possible, these issues are discussed at local, national and global levels to demonstrate how policy and cultural differences impact the various threats to the environment and to the human population. Environmental threats are discussed both in the context of their impact on natural ecosystems and their potential threat to human health and economic growth.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum

Corequisites

BIO 242

ENS 307 Environmental Microbiology

This course will provide an advanced understanding of environmental microbiology. The course focuses on understanding the role environmental microbiology has on our daily lives, microbial community structure and communication, growth, reproduction, metabolism, gene expression, and diversity of microorganisms, mechanical and chemical environmental mechanisms to control microbial growth, industrial applications of microbiology.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category I)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

ENS 307L

ENS 307L Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

This course will provide an advanced understanding of environmental microbiology. The course focuses on understanding the role environmental microbiology has on our daily lives, microbial community structure and communication, growth, reproduction, metabolism, gene expression, and diversity of microorganisms, mechanical and chemical environmental mechanisms to control microbial growth, industrial applications of microbiology
Credit Hours: 0
(NS) (Category I).

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

Corequisites

ENS 307

ENS 349 Water, Wetlands and Wildlife

This lecture course covers the struggle between rapid human population growth, the availability of clean water, and the health of aquatic and wetland systems and the wildlife within. Covers a broad range of topics from three major themes: 1) water resource use and water pollution impacts and policy; 2) wetlands biology, impacts, legislation, jurisdictional determination and policy; and 3) the biology, impacts, assessment and conservation of aquatic and semi-aquatic wildlife. International case studies will augment a focus on water issues in the U.S.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum.

ENS 401 Sustainability Capstone Seminar

Sustainability is an inherently interdisciplinary field despite the fact that its constituent sub-disciplines are often taught in isolation. The purpose of this seminar is to encourage synthesis of sustainability knowledge across major disciplines (i.e., natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities), which will be developed through student-led discussion of relevant literature and team-based projects. Through these projects, students will identify a sustainability issue in the local community, develop economic and environmental impact assessments, create a solution proposal, and present their findings to the local community. This course is a required component of the Minor degree in Sustainability.

Credit Hours: 1

ENT 320 Introduction to Entrepreneurship/Feasibility

This course requires students to develop a feasibility study for a new business venture. The study will be utilized throughout courses in the major and will form the basis of the business plan in ENT 487. In addition to a historical review of entrepreneurship, students assess the value of a concept and explore opportunity recognition, innovation and creativity, pro forma financial statement development, the legal structures of business, risk analysis and types of entrepreneurial ventures.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

COB requirements for taking 300-level courses, AWR 101, AWR 201.

ENT 330 Creativity and Innovative Problem Solving

This course introduces students to the principles and techniques of creativity and opportunity recognition that are critical to an entrepreneurial mindset.  Students will learn a wide variety of creative problem solving and theory building skills and have the opportunity to apply those to the development of an innovation or invention.  Students will also learn how to identify and reduce self-imposed limitations to creativity and opportunity recognition.  In addition, business modeling techniques are presented as a method for evaluating creative ideas.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 or MGT 330 and all prerequisites for either ENT 320 or MGT 330

ENT 360 New Venture Finance

Major sources of funding for new ventures - including family and friends funding, angels, venture capitalists, informal investors, banks, investment banks, suppliers, buyers and the government - are reviewed and evaluated in this course. Some topics for this course include debt and equity capital markets, valuation, bootstrapping, joint ventures, strategic alliances, private placements, IPOs and management buyouts. Student will create pro formas and develop a funding plan for a new venture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 , FIN 310 and all prerequisites for ENT 320 and for FIN 310.

Corequisites

ENT 487.

ENT 380 Introduction to Hospitality Management

This course provides an overview of the trends and developments as well as the fundamental management functions in the hospitality industry. Students will gain an understanding of the primary segments of industry, including lodging, restaurants, theme parks, clubs and event management.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 or MGT 330 and all prerequisites for either ENT 320 or MGT 330.

ENT 390 Managing the Family Business

This course begins with an overview of the basic business principles as they apply to multi-generational businesses. The course covers the vital importance of family businesses to communities and national economies, and the unique problems and opportunities they face. A systems perspective is used to understand the dynamics among family members, the ownership and the management of the business. The course uses speakers, case studies and assessment tools to develop understanding and strategies for managing those dynamics. It is designed for majors and non-majors either from or interested in family businesses.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 or MGT 330 and all prerequisites for either ENT 320 or MGT 330.

ENT 420 Managing the Start Up Venture

This course addresses the principles of organizational architecture, group behavior and performance, interpersonal influence, leadership and motivation in entrepreneurial settings. This course is a writing intensive course, requiring students to develop written organizational model articulating the startups organizational design, human resources management, leadership and organizational behavior in the context of a new, small firm. For many entrepreneurs, the most pressing questions (aside from those about financing) are about how to locate and recruit talented people, and how to manage and keep them, and how to build a high-growth, long-term, sustainable firm.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Prerequisite - ENT 320, MGT 330, and all prerequisites for ENT 320 and MGT 330.

ENT 487 Business Plan Development

This course draws on a broad range of business disciplines including management, marketing, finance and accounting to develop the business plan. Critical elements of the plan include industry/market analysis, clear opportunity and concept definition, target market analysis, a comprehensive human resource plan, financial pro forma analysis, as well as statements of sources and uses of funds, and an assessment of critical risks. Semester-long work on the business plan culminates with a business plan competition.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ENT 320 and all prerequisites for ENT 320.

Corequisites

ENT 360

ENT 490 Entrepreneurship Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May be used to satisfy up to 4 credit hours of entrepreneurship electives. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320, junior or senior standing and at least a 2.75 cumulative GPA or a 3.0 in COB courses.

ENT 495 Seminar in Entrepreneurship

Topics vary and focus on emerging ideas and the latest research in areas of entrepreneurship that are not covered by the current curriculum. Sample topics include creativity and problem-solving, innovation and technology entrepreneurship, legal issues for entrepreneurs, corporate entrepreneurship, real estate venturing and social entrepreneurship.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 320 and all prerequisites for ENT 320 or permission of instructor.

ENT 610 Preparing for the Entrepreneurial Journey

Entrepreneurship is the art of business. Think of the business plan and the business operation as your canvas. Entrepreneurship takes creativity, innovation and perseverance. Entrepreneurship is a way of thinking and acting. In this course, you will acquire a greater understanding of the entrepreneurial process — a process of opportunity recognition, resource marshalling and team building driven by communication, creativity and leadership. You will work on YOUR business concept.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Acceptance into the MS in ENT program

ENT 620 Creativity and Innovation for Entrepreneurs

This course is part of the M.S. in Entrepreneurship and introduces students to the principles and techniques of ideation, creativity and opportunity recognition that are critical to an entrepreneurial mindset. Students will learn a wide variety of creative problem solving and theory building skills and have the opportunity to apply those to the development of a new concept and venture. Students will also learn how to identify and reduce self-imposed limitations to creativity and opportunity recognition. In addition, business modeling techniques are introduced as a method for evaluating creative ideas.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610

ENT 630 Selecting and Developing a Business Model

Creating new businesses, capturing new markets and enhancing organizational effectiveness occur through improving productivity or innovation, or both. New discoveries, new technologies, competition and globalization compel both entrepreneurs and existing firms to foster innovation and agility. This course explores successful frameworks, strategies, funding techniques, business models, risks and barriers for introducing breakthrough products and services. Topics include business model innovation, design-driven innovation and leadership. The focus is on the selection of appropriate business models.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610 and ENT 620

ENT 640 New Venture Finance

This course uses a combination of of case discussions and lectures to study entrepreneurial finance. The course is targeted toward budding entrepreneurs. The course begins with an overview of financial statements. A thorough examination of forecasting revenues and expenses are used to create pro forma financial statements. The course then shifts to financing operations of startups with limited resources. External sources of financing to fund growth are introduced, and the tax implications of all financial decisions are evaluated. The course concludes with a discussion of exit strategies available to harvest the investment in the startup.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610, ENT 620 and ENT 630. This course also has an on-line component that must be completed before taking the class.

ENT 650 Entrepreneurial Marketing

In this course we will explore how marketing and entrepreneurship affect and are affected by one another. We will examine concepts from each of these two areas to determine how they apply to and how they can aid the practice of the other. We will look at the role of marketing in entrepreneurial ventures and the role of entrepreneurship in marketing efforts of all firms. Attention will be devoted to understanding why marketers resist entrepreneurship, as well as the common mistakes entrepreneurs make when it comes to marketing.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610, ENT 620, and ENT 630. The course has an on-line component that must be completed before taking the class.

ENT 660 Risk Mitigation and Legal Issues for Entrepreneurs

This course broadly surveys the legal issues affecting entrepreneurial ventures, including: selecting and working with an attorney, business entity selection, corporate governance, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, operational liabilities, insurance, debtor-creditor relations, bankruptcy, human resources and buying and selling a business.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610, ENT 620, and ENT 630

ENT 675 Leading and Managing New Ventures

This is not a survey course in entrepreneurship or in leadership. Instead, this course addresses the principles of organizational architecture, group behavior and performance, interpersonal influence, leadership and motivation in entrepreneurial settings. A primary goal is to develop your competencies in organizational design, human resources management, leadership and organizational behavior in the context of a new, small firm.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610, ENT 620, and ENT 630

ENT 680 Communicating with Investors and Partners

This course treats entrepreneurship as a form of strategy. In today’s competitive environment, size of company does not correspond to entrepreneurship. On the one hand, companies like Microsoft, General Electric and Southwest Airlines have kept excellent cultures of entrepreneurship despite decades of phenomenal growth. On the other, large companies usually find their most aggressive competitors to be startups. Regardless of the type of company you will work in, it is critical to have a strong working knowledge of entrepreneurial strategies. You will work on your project in this course.


Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ENT 610, ENT 620, and ENT 630

ENT 689 Entrepreneurship in a Global Economy

This course provides an understanding of the principles of entrepreneurship and new venture creation in a global marketplace. In additional to examining the role of entrepreneurship in the global economy, the course will focus on developing skills that are fundamental to recognizing and developing a business opportunity.  Students will examine key features of an international business deal as well as legal, financial, and cultural considerations that impact an international business opportunity. Utilizing these skills, students will prepare a feasibility analysis for an international business concept.
Credit Hours: 4

ENT 695 Seminar in Entrepreneurship

For graduate students only. Topics vary and will focus on emerging ideas and the latest research in areas of entrepreneurship that are not covered by the current curriculum. Though not limited to these, example topics include creativity and problem-solving, innovation and technology entrepreneurship, legal issues for entrepreneurs, corporate entrepreneurship, real estate venturing and social entrepreneurship.

Credit Hours: 4

ESC 105 Biokinetics and Conditioning

Involves testing, designing and implementing a personal physical fitness program. Emphasis is on developing and implementing personal fitness programs that include cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 110 Introduction to Exercise Science and Sport Studies

An introduction to the exercise science profession, including the objectives, structure, history, philosophy and biological aspects of physical education and their field applications.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 150 Comprehensive First Aid/CPR/AED

This course provides the knowledge and practical skills necessary to help sustain life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until advanced medical personnel arrive. Students develop an awareness of safety and emergency response planning in the worksite and community. Topics include CPR with AED training, prevention of infectious disease transmission, trauma care, sudden illness care, environmental hazards care and emergency response planning. American Red Cross Certifications in Adult/Child/Infant CPR with AED and Responding to Emergencies First Aid may be earned. Lab fees for certification required.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 151 Swimming

Develops fundamental skills and methods for teaching swimming and water safety.

Credit Hours: 1

ESC 200 Methods of Teaching Tennis

Covers methods and procedures for teaching tennis. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 1

ESC 202 Outdoor Education

An interdisciplinary approach to education in the outdoors, combining lectures, observations, field investigations and practical experiences in camping, canoeing, fish and wildlife management, environmental control and other concomitants of the outdoors. Two hours may be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 4

ESC 240 Lifetime Sports

Covers methods of teaching the recreational sports of archery, badminton and golf. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 280 Adult Fitness

A comprehensive discussion of corporate fitness that stresses fitness testing, prescriptive fitness programs and the role of fitness centers in the corporate/community structure.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 296 Independent Study in Exercise Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.
Credit Hours: 1-8

ESC 299 Special Topics in Exercise Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. Subjects may focus on exercise science topics of current interest in the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.
Credit Hours: 3-4

ESC 301 Sport and Exercise Psychology

This is an elective course that will appeal to students who are interested in learning about human behavior during sports and exercise. It examines what motivates us, frightens us, angers us and affects our performance of physical activity or sport. Strategies for improving competitive skills, dealing with competitive pressure, maximizing performance and promoting emotional and cognitive health and well-being will be explored. In particular, this course will appeal to students majoring in human performance, athletic training, sport management, physical education, and allied health.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 312 Dance/Rhythmics

A course that prepares students for teaching creative rhythmics, aerobic dance, folk and square dance, line and social dance to participants of all ages.

Credit Hours: 3
(A)

ESC 320 Coaching and Teaching of Football and Wrestling

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants, as well as officiating in football and wrestling, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 321 Coaching and Teaching of Baseball, Basketball and Softball

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants, as well as officiating in baseball, basketball and softball, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 322 Coaching and Teaching of Volleyball and Track and Field

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants of volleyball and track and field, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 323 Coaching and Teaching of Soccer and Field Hockey

Focusing on developing and testing skills in participants of soccer and field hockey, and examining the psychology of coaching. May be used toward professional activities requirement of Exercise and Recreation Leadership concentration.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 329 Coaching Team and Individual Sports

A comprehensive approach to coaching athletics, including planning, values, psychology, roles and goals.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 330 Human Development and Motor Learning

A study of human development and motor learning throughout the life cycle, with emphasis on physical growth, the effects of exercise, fundamental motor patterns and developmental skill acquisition.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better.

ESC 340 Applied Kinesiology

A study of bone-muscle relationships and problems of analysis in human motion as related to the muscular skills in body mechanics and athletics.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better.

ESC 371 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries

Familiarization with the field of athletic training and the basic techniques, principles and theories underlying the prevention and care of a variety of athletic injuries and conditions.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better and ESC 340. Pre- or corequisities: ESC 150 or HSC 250.

ESC 372 Principles of Exercise Leadership

This course will provide ESC adult fitness and teaching majors with the proper form, mechanics and cues to perform and present fundamental movement skills safely. In addition, majors will learn proper execution. They will also identify and analyze movement errors, and develop appropriate correction and cueing. The basics of assessment, presentation, observation and correction will be applied as students work with individuals and lead groups with the intent of developing motor and fitness skills and routines.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

HSC 100 and HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better.

ESC 380 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Studies trends in exercise habits, exercise evaluations and the process for clients developing a total wellness approach to living. Students will learn to apply principles of developing a fitness program. Lab fees for personal trainer certification examination required. Current First Aid/CPR certification required for certification examination.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better (ESC 340 recommended).

ESC 391 Environmental Exercise Physiology and Outdoor Recreation in New Zealand

This on-campus component meets for 7 weeks in the semester prior to international departure; it is linked to a travel course (ESC 391A). Enrollment and successful completion of the on-campus component (ESC 391) is required for travel abroad. Content includes exploration of how environmental stressors impact human physiological processes during physical activity, comparison of national agendas for health and physical activity between the US and NZ as well as professional issues related physical activity leadership, and prevention and mitigation of risk during participation in physical activity.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Instructor Permission.

ESC 391A Environmental Exercise Physiology and Outdoor Recreation in New Zealand – Travel Abroad

This is the study abroad compliment to ESC 391. Successful completion of the on-campus component (ESC 391) is required for enrollment in the study-abroad component. Through travel to the host country and with a focus on experiential learning, students examine the physiological contribution to participation in outdoor recreational activities. Ample opportunities to interact with academics, practitioners and students are provided during workshops and seminars in a human performance facilities at the partner institution. Exploration of the host country's culture, history, and landscape is provided during and participation in typical outdoor adventure activities.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

(1) Successful completion of ESC 391 (didactic) (2) Valid First Aid, CPR/AED certifications (3) Physical and medical capacity/fitness to engage in outdoor adventure activities such as trekking, kayaking, etc. (4) Instructor Permission

ESC 400 Physical Education and Fitness for Special Populations

Examines the special physical education and physical fitness needs of individuals with chronic or functional handicaps.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

ESC 405 Community Physical Activity Programs

Through didactic and service-learning, students gain hands-on experience in physical activity programming; this includes health and physical fitness assessment, program design, and implementation. Community partnerships are utilized for client recruitment; the client population may change each offering. Students, under the supervision of a faculty member, work directly with a community partner and a client/athlete during the course. Client sessions occur during the scheduled class period, but may be held off campus. Students may be required to submit a background check or proof of vaccinations prior to enrollment.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

(1) Suggested Pre- or Co-req Courses: ESC 380, ESC 400, ESC 460 (2) Valid adult CPR/AED certification (3) Background check and Proof of vaccinations may be required (4) Instructor Permission

ESC 411 Recreation Leadership and Administration

A study of the organizational patterns and administrative processes involved in leisure-oriented organizations.

Credit Hours: 2

ESC 414 Sports and Society

An analysis of sports from a sociological perspective. Investigates sport theory from historical to modern contexts. Includes a critical appraisal of the expanding literature on the origins, functions and effects of sports in society.

Credit Hours: 3

ESC 450 Tests and Measurement

Open only to junior and senior exercise science majors whose concentration is teaching physical education, and exercise science students whose concentration is adult fitness. A study of the available tests, measurement and assessment procedures for the physical education or fitness instructor.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 105 and ESC 110 or HSC 200

ESC 460 Physiology of Exercise

Develops knowledge and understanding of the function and limitations of the organism during exercise.

Credit Hours: 3
(W)

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better.

ESC 470 Field Work in Recreation

An instructional program that includes supervised pre-professional practice in approved recreational service agencies. Involves observation and participation in planning, conducting and evaluating at the face-to-face supervisory and executive levels of leadership. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Credit Hours: 4-6

Prerequisites

Completion of 6 credit hours of professional courses and departmental approval.

ESC 480 Internship in Human Performance

Offers practical experience in health and fitness center programming. Admission by application to the department chair. Students must provide proof of current CPR certification, and may be required to provide individual liability insurance. Graded on a pass/fail basis. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 2-12

Prerequisites

Senior academic status and departmental approval.

ESC 485 Undergraduate Research in Human Performance

This course is an experiential education course that focuses on conducting undergraduate research in human performance and working along with a faculty member.  The students will be engaged in project conception, background literature study, methodology, data collection, analyzing results, and possible presentation of research to larger community.  At least 2 hours a week is required for each credit hour.
Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

ESC 491 Senior Seminar in Exercise Science

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced understanding of how to read, present, and interpret data involved in exercise science research. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

ESC 380 and senior status

ESC 496 Independent Study in Exercise Science

Independent Study in Exercise Science - A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.
Credit Hours: 1-8

ESC 499 Special Topics in Physical Education

A seminar and/or independent study incorporating special issues in the field of physical education. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior standing.

ESC 605 Dimensions of Strength Training

This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of advanced dimensions and theory of strength and conditioning.  It will cover multiple components of strength and conditioning and how they relate to human performance. The course will analyze acute training variables (exercise choice, order, intensity, volume) on a per training session basis and how they fit within the scope of a training year and career (periodization).

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission.

ESC 607 Exercise and Nutrition Science Theory

This is a seminar style course in which students investigate and report on nutrition theories underlying sport nutrition and how it relates to human performance. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission.

ESC 615 Physiology and Energetics of Exercise

This course covers, in depth, theories on the physiological responses to exercise in untrained, trained, and athletic populations.  It provides students with an advanced understanding of the role  physiological responses to exercise training.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission.

ESC 617 Current Perspectives in Exercise Science

This is an interactive course in which students investigate applications used in exercise science by experts in the field and report on the scientific efficacy and application of these practices.  The course also involves application of theory using various case studies throughout the semester. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission.

ESC 625 Exercise and Nutrition Laboratory Techniques

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a hands on advanced understanding of how to utilize laboratory techniques associated with nutrition and exercise science.  Including but not limited to body composition analysis, ultrasonography, isokinetic, isotonic, and isometric force testing.  Strength and power assessment, as well as a review of important exercise techniques.  

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Must be a graduate student in the Masters of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program or by instructor permission.

ESC 696 Independent Study in Exercise Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. Eligible students are in the Masters of Exercise and Nutrition Science program. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.
Credit Hours: 1-8

FIN 250 Personal Finance

This course is intended to help students understand and apply basic principles of good financial management in their personal financial decisions. Topics include personal budgeting, tax planning, managing cash and credit, making sound insurance decisions, investments and retirement planning. Not counted as a finance elective for the minor or the major.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent

FIN 310 Financial Management

This course focuses on financial analysis and decision-making for corporations including the legal and ethical obligations of financial managers. Students use accounting information to assess a firm's performance. Time value of money and incremental discounted cash flow techniques are used to value stocks, bonds, and potential corporate investments. Students calculate the weighted average cost of capital and are learn to apply short-term financial management tools. The risk-return trade-off is introduced using a statistical framework and the Capital Asset Pricing Model. MS-Excel and a financial calculator are required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 with a "C" or better, AWR 201, ACC 202 and ACC 203, ECO 204 and ECO 205, QMB 210. A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in at at least 22 hours of 100- and 200-level required COB courses.

Corequisites

BAC 100.

FIN 319 Applied Finance and Accounting using Enterprise Resource Systems

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the financial and accounting features of SAP as a solution for enterprise resource planning. The cross functional nature of business processes requires an integrated view of the company. The integration between finance and other business functions are analyzed within the context of the enterprise resource system. The configuration, data and critical transactions required by financial management are demonstrated in the course.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and a minimum GPA of 2.25 in at least 22 credit hours in required 100- and 200-level required COB courses.

FIN 410 Intermediate Financial Management

An in-depth study of financial decision-making primarily in the corporate environment. This course builds and expands on the skills developed in the managerial finance course. Topics include financial statement analysis, the capital budgeting process, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, working capital management and short- and long-term financial planning. The course will include both theory and practice, and students will make extensive use of Excel.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and MAT 225

FIN 415 Applied Investment Management

This course provides an opportunity for students to blend the theory of investments with the practical demands of hands-on investment management. Hands-on management of a real portfolio achieves the practical objectives. Periodically, security analysts and portfolio managers are invited as guest speakers to share practical insights on the investment management process. Bloomberg training is available.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 440 and GPA of 3.0 or greater

FIN 425 International Financial Management

The course examines the role of the multinational firm as a catalyst and facilitator of international business. Examines and explores the management of international financial risk, foreign exchange, corporate financing from a global perspective, direct foreign investment decisions and international portfolio allocation.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and MAT 225.

FIN 440 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

This is a course in the theory and the practice of investment management. The course includes analysis of specific securities as well as asset allocation and portfolio management strategies. The focus of the course is on professional money management, especially equity portfolio management. Successful investment managers learn to take an ethical, client-centered approach to investment decision making, while making use of financial models and datasets and navigating a highly regulated and competitive business environment.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310.

FIN 450 Risk Management for Business

Students will evaluate a variety of types of risk that impact a company's financial performance. Students will develop a comprehensive risk management strategy for a firm that incorporates derivative securities, insurance, and other risk management tools. Formal and informal written assignments will be used to enhance the students' understanding of the impact of risk management strategies on a firm's individual performance and on the economic environment. The course requires extensive use of Excel at the intermediate level for evaluating the financial implications of decisions
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

FIN 410 and COB lower core.

FIN 470 Financial Markets, Institutions, and Money

A survey of the global financial environment, including major financial institutions, securities markets and other financial markets. Topics include money and banking, the determination of interest rates, monetary policy, market efficiency, investment banking, hedging, risk management and derivatives. The course emphasizes current and recent economic trends and financial innovations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310.

FIN 480 Financial Models

This course will provide applied skills in designing and building financial models. The course will span several financial topics all of which will be worked on within Excel framework. The primary focus of the course is to relate the theory of finance to practical and usable spreadsheet models that will assist a financial manager with a firm’s investment and financing decisions.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 & FIN 410

FIN 490 Finance Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

FIN 310, junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

FIN 491 Advanced Financial Management

Senior seminar course for finance majors. An advanced, in-depth course in finance with heavy use of cases that explore timely topics in-depth, such as forecasting and financial modeling, financial statement analysis and working- capital management. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 310 and FIN 410.

FIN 495 Special Topics in Finance

A course offered at the discretion of the finance department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

FIN 499 Independent Study in Finance

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA and consent of the department chair and associate dean.

FIN 500 Foundations of Finance

Covers the basic tools and applications used in financial management. Includes time value of money, valuation, project evaluation, risk-return analysis and capital structure. Students will solve a variety of problems using financial calculator and spreadsheet programs.

Credit Hours: 2

FIN 611 Financial Management and Strategy

For graduate students only. This course is concerned with the theory and the practice of managerial finance, especially in the context of the publicly held corporation in a competitive global environment. The course includes analysis of current and historical financial position and short-term financial decisions. The course emphasizes long-term strategic decisions such as major investments, acquisitions and capital structure decisions. The principles of cost-benefit analysis, value creation, risk and return, and time value of money are demonstrated in a variety of business case examples. The course includes an introduction to portfolio theory, international finance and financial derivatives. Includes curriculum from the CFA® program.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500, ECO 500, FIN 500, and QMB 500.

FIN 616 Corporate Finance and Valuation

This course will show students how to value a publicly held company using valuation techniques including Free Cash Flow, Market Comparable and Economic Profit Analyses. This course uses a combination of case study learning and currently available information to establish the methodology and execution of the various valuation techniques. Students will use these valuation techniques to value a publicly held company. Students will be required to deal with and get comfortable with the uncertainty in the corporate valuation field. Students will be required to research a public company and make decisions concerning capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 or FIN 626.

FIN 617 Analytics in Finance

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the latest techniques and methodologies used in the analysis of financial data. Students will become familiar with several types of finance datasets such as Bloomberg, CRSP and Compustat, be able to manage and work with large datasets, understand the issues faced by an analyst with respect to selection bias and endogeneity in applied finance and propose possible solutions for the same. In the Analytics in Finance course students will learn and apply discipline-specific statistical and econometric techniques. Specifically, student will perform and communicate empirical analysis by examining a specific research question.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 500 and QMB 500.

FIN 626 Financial Analysis for Management

This course uses mathematical and statistical models and current financial data to analyze various topics in corporate finance, bridging the gap between theory and practice.  Topics covered include analysis of financial performance and forecasting, capital budgeting, investment decisions, working capital management, external financing, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, and real option analysis. Students use various tools to analyze cash flows, net present value, risk and return, and valuation using real business data. Students will also investigate advanced corporate finance topics such as corporate restructuring, agency problems, asymmetric information, and executive compensation policies. Includes curriculum from the CFA® Program. 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500, ECO 500, QMB 500 and FIN 500

FIN 630 International Finance

Course applies no-arbitrage theory to multinational financial management. Topics include international financial markets, international parity conditions, hedging foreign cash flows, arbitrage portfolios, international capital budgeting, international portfolio allocation and international cost of capital. Includes curriculum from the CFA® program.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 or FIN 626.

FIN 640 Investment Portfolio Management

Encompasses portfolio management at both introductory and intermediate levels. Topic areas include: quantitative analysis, the portfolio management process and investor policy statements, portfolio construction and types of securities, portfolio performance measures and the option strategies for equity portfolios. The course also includes detailed analysis of fixed income securities, macroeconomics, industries and individual firms. Includes curriculum from the CFA® program.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 500, ECO 500, FIN 500, and QMB 500.

FIN 645 Advanced Portfolio Management

This course deals with the theory and practice of portfolio management and investment analysis at an advanced level. The emphasis is on strategic investment management topics and applications including portfolio optimization, performance attribution techniques, fixed income analysis and portfolio risk management. Students will learn to critically evaluate and implement existing and recently developed portfolio management models. Includes curriculum from the CFA® program.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 640.

FIN 650 Venture Capital and Alternative Investments

This course describes the common types of alternative investments, methods for their valuation, advanced data analytic techniques, unique risks and opportunities associated with them, and the relationships that alternatives have to more traditional investments. Includes curriculum from the CFA® Program.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 or FIN 626.

FIN 660 Applied Corporate Finance

Applied Corporate Finance is designed to provide an in-depth examination of important financial management concepts integrated with SAP. Using a balanced approach of theory and application, this class focuses on the analytical techniques involved in financial planning and decision-making in the firm. Primary emphasis is placed on the importance of strategic investment and financing choices and the logic behind these critical decisions made by the financial manager. An introduction to the financial accounting features of SAP as a solution for enterprise resource planning is provided, along with using SAP to generate information used to make financial decisions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 or FIN 626.

FIN 670 Financial Markets and Derivatives

This course is concerned with the creation, pricing and trading of financial assets and derivative securities and the financial markets those securities are traded in. Topics include financial intermediation, the determination of interest rates, banking, monetary policy, investment banking, and market efficiency. Students learn to use financial models to analyze the characteristics and valuation of securities based on interest rates and other market rates for a variety of financial assets including derivative securities. The course emphasizes current trends in financial markets and financial innovations. Includes curriculum from the CFA® Program.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FIN 611 or FIN 626.

FIN 689 Global Finance

Global finance introduces the key financial techniques of exchange rate forecasting, capital budgeting, capital structure, risk management, and portfolio theory all from a global perspective. The course is aimed for graduate students seeking a thorough introduction to finance topics which are extended using experiential educational techniques. Appropriate software including Monte Carlo simulation and enterprise resource planning systems are applied to enhance the technical capabilities of future financial leaders in a global marketplace.
Credit Hours: 4

FIN 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval by the Graduate Office, the college internship coordinator and the associate dean.

FIN 695 Special Topics in Finance

A course offered at the discretion of the finance department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

FIN 699 Independent Study in Finance

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in finance.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

FMX 201 World Animation

A critical and analytical study of the history of animation, from the earliest experiments in countries around the world to modern day computer and videogame animation in Western and non-Western contexts. The course content may consist of lectures, screenings, and discussions, as well as the production of simple animation projects in response to course material. Course readings go in depth to provide an understanding of animation from Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, the United States and Canada, each in its own context. May be counted in the Humanities if not credited to the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (HFA) (NW)

FMX 207 Digital Drawing

A studio production course that provides an introduction and investigation into digital drawing techniques, principals, concepts and styles. This course involves the correlation between digital drawing and themes. Emphasis is on studying digital drawing styles and techniques. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

FMX 210 Digital Media

A studio production course that introduces electronic and digital tools for use in diverse media projects. Covers the history, evolution and theory of relevant technology in order to provide context for the hardware and software used in the class. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

FMX 211 Media Arts: History and Theory

A survey of media in art, including theatre, architecture, sculpture, painting, film, video, sound/music, photography, performance, games and computing and an exploration of how these art forms have been changed by technologies that are digital, networked, immersive, biotechnical and interactive. Within this context the course explores the use of technology as both a medium and a tool. Recent developments in media arts are examined in relationship to historic art movements with an emphasis on the history of art and its critical interpretation.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

FMX 213 3D Printing and Modeling

A studio production course that explores 3D computer modeling and creation of physical reproductions of the 3D models using 3D printers. Includes an investigation into the theory and concepts  of additive manufacturing and design. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST) (IG)

FMX 217 3D Animation I

A studio production course that gives an introduction to three-dimensional computer animation, exploring the basic techniques of modeling and animation. The course also includes necessary aspects of texture mapping, deformation, motion control, lighting, cameras and rendering. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

FMX 238 2D Animation I

A studio production course that teaches the technique of animation as a visual medium, and enables students (regardless of major) to design, script, write, direct and communicate concepts through animation. Emphasizes art, history, movement, audio design and writing. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used in the major. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

FMX 240 Screenwriting Fundamentals

An introduction to the practice and principles behind the art and craft of screenwriting. Class includes writing exercises, pitching sessions, script readings, and screenings and film analysis of dramatic narrative films, animation and emergent media. Students complete a series of writing assignments, write short screenplays with Final Draft software, and multiple drafts leading to complete short format screenplays. Students learn about major screenwriters and the art, structure and aesthetics of various types of films and emergent media.  This is a writing intensive course, may be used to fulfill the requirements for and the humanities, if not used in the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

FMX 241 Sound, Image and Motion

A studio production course that teaches introduction to hands-on digital film production and post-production. Each student will complete a short documentary, narrative and experimental film. Technical instruction will include level-one instruction on non-linear digital editing software and an introduction to HD cameras. Students will be introduced to portable equipment at the cage (including cameras, tripods, audio recording tools and more) and production facilities, including the black box studio space. Class will be comprised of technical demonstrations, in-class shoots and critiques of student work. Basic history, theory and aesthetics of related media are presented.

May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

FMX 298 Professional Seminar

A studio production course, students develop professional online portfolios, as assigned, to include: 1) work completed within their majors at UT; 2) work from other institutions in transferred courses; 3) bios, project statements, resumes and cover letters. Final portfolios will be submitted for FMX 398 Junior Portfolio Review to be reviewed by FMX faculty. Class will include brainstorming sessions to solve technical and conceptual problems with the support of fellow students, invited faculty and guest professionals. To be taken with FMX 398 after completion of 44 credits. For Animation, Digital Arts, New Media, or BFA Film and Media Arts programs.

Credit Hours: 2
(HFA)

Prerequisites

FMX 210 or FMX 241, and 44 or more earned credits, with at least one of the following: FMX 217, FMX 238, FMX 310, FMX 312, FMX 313, FMX 314, COM 339, or FMX 463; or consent of instructor.

FMX 310 Creative Coding

A studio production course that is a continued exploration of graphic and time based tools with emphasis on the creative usage of programming languages. The class will be centered around the interactive manipulation of traditional and experimental time based media and graphics. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 210

FMX 311 Online Production

A studio production course that is an advanced Web design and production class addressing the history and culture of the Internet and exploring the Web as a domain for publication and expression for online producers. Special emphasis is placed on defining the differences between client-side and server-side creations, and how these affect the content and presentation of the information on the Web. It also emphasizes the evolution of multimedia into hypermedia through the use of client/server tools, Web services, programming languages and databases. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 210

FMX 312 Narrative Production

A studio production course that offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore narrative filmmaking using digital technologies in a combined theory and practice approach. Each student completes a series of short digital films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of narrative film. Technical instruction includes digital cinematography, lighting, sound and editing. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of the narrative film. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or FMX 240 and FMX 241 or FMX 313.

FMX 313 Documentary Production

A studio production course that offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore documentary filmmaking using digital technologies in a combined theory and practice approach. Each student completes one or more short digital films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of the documentary film. Technical instruction includes digital cinematography, lighting, sound and editing. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of documentary film and video. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the majors. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 241

FMX 314 Experimental Filmmaking

A studio production course that offers students a hands-on opportunity to explore experimental filmmaking in a combined theory and practice approach. Each student completes one or more short films relating to the history, theory and aesthetics of the experimental film. Technical instruction includes cinematography, camera operation, lighting, editing and sound. Class includes screenings and discussions on the history and theory of experimental cinema. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities, if not in the majors. Laboratory fee required.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 241 or FMX 313

FMX 315 3D Sculpting

An advanced studio production course that further develops skills in 3D printing skills with a focus in 3D sculpting. Applications in 3D sculpting will be studied in depth to create different types of highly detailed 3D models, from hard surface objects to fantastic creatures and characters. Industry standard software and techniques will be used during class. Retopology, exporting and portfolio/demo reel creation will also be a component of the course. Laboratory fee required.,

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 217

FMX 317 3D Animation II

A studio production course that investigates three-dimensional computer animation, including advanced techniques of modeling and animation. This course also includes necessary aspects of texture mapping, character rigging, motion control, animation principles, digital lighting, virtual camera principles, particle effects, dynamics and rendering. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 217

FMX 320 Animation for Interactivity and Games

An advanced studio production course that investigates and develops skills and knowledge in, 3D computer modeling for game graphics, game asset and animation clip development, coding for interactive content and game engines, and content for virtual and augmented reality. The course will also cover character rigging, surface texturing and digital lighting as it applies to games and interactivity. The integration of content into game engines and the distribution of content along with multiplayer experiences will be covered. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 217

FMX 321 Motion Capture

An advanced studio production course that investigates and develops skills in, simple script writing, directing, choreography, and animation in the area of motion capture for film, games, computer simulations, and interactive media. Computer character design and computer character rigging will be a component to facilitate original creative outcomes. This course offers the opportunity for students to offer professional services to the community in the form of motion capture data. It also seeks to prepare students to work with dancers, performers, athletes, and actors in their animation, VFX and game development careers. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 217

FMX 322 Visual Effects

A studio production course that introduces students to digital visual effects (VFX) for film, animation, new media and television. Through hands-on creative VFX assignments students will gain basic skills, including: compositing, keying, matchmoving, rotoscoping, camera projection and basic 3D animation. Students will learn how visual effects have evolved globally, and are used in the gamut of productions from cutting edge music videos to groundbreaking films and documentaries. Students will create portfolios of their own work through the exploration of contemporary VFX techniques used within the professional and independent industry. This course may be counted in the Humanities if not credited in the major. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 241

FMX 324 Cinematography

A studio production course that covers the aesthetics and techniques of motion picture cinematography through hands-on demos and assignments. Instruction includes camera operation with in-class workshops utilizing  Canon DSLR, RED Scarlet and Blackmagic cameras, inter-changeable lenses, filters, lighting, diffusion screens, car-mounts and support systems. Underwater cinematography, macro cinematography, time lapse, and other specialized techniques will be covered. Through this course students will creatively explore the principles of cinematography including, composition, exploring the X and Z axis, use of light, color theory, depth of field, and more. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 241

FMX 328 Sound in Media

A studio production course that will encourage experimentation and innovation in sound design for motion pictures, animation, and new media. Instruction and assignments will include techniques in location and studio recording, audio post-production, including ADR, sound effects editing, and mixing that can be applied to a wide array of media - from films, to mobile applications, to audio installation. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 241

FMX 331 The Creative Triangle

A studio production course that explores the roles in the creative decision-making processes of the director, cinematographer and production designer.  It emphasizes the technical, administrative and communication skills that provide the means for successful realization of drama, television, documentary and new media projects.  The aim is to develop a wide range of skills necessary for effective performance in these roles in the context of complex creative collaboration.  Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Any of the following: FMX 312, FMX 313, FMX 314.

FMX 338 2D Animation II

A studio production course that professionalizes the implementation and production of animation techniques, including the use of computers. Advanced projects deal with specific problems and exercises in drawing, storyboard and script/visual analysis. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 238 or consent of instructor.

FMX 339 Game Design and Production

A studio production course in creative digital interactive game design and production. Each student will pitch a unique game concept, develop storyboards, prototypes, and layouts, explore user interfaces, interactivity and application architecture, and create the game through industry standard programming languages and mobile platforms. Classes will be comprised of hands-on workshops on UX/UI design concepts, software and coding, critiques of students works in-process, and the basic theory and history behind successful games. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 310 Creative Coding or ITM 251 Application Development or COM 315 Web Design

FMX 340 Screenwriting Development

Covers the elements of developing and writing scripts for feature films, animation projects, and other long form media, including character development, dialogue, and dramatic structure. This is a writing intensive course, and may be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities, if not used in the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or FMX 240

FMX 341 Screenwriting Shorts

A writing intensive workshop course designed to generate and refine short-form script-writing for narrative filmmaking, animation, and other short-form narrative media. Students will analyze short narratives in cinema, literature, and other media, and explore structure, character, situational drama and conflict, and cinematic modes of the short form story on screen through workshops of original stories, revised screenplays, and stories adapted for screens from previously-written material. This is a writing intensive course, and may be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities, if not used in the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

COM 226 or FMX 240

FMX 342 Producing Motion Pictures and Digital Media

A studio production course that teaches producing of professional Hollywood style and independent episodic, serial, and long form, and/or interactive digital media productions. Students acquire skills in production budgets, package development, assignment of production roles, script breakdown, shooting schedules, call sheets, location permits, guilds and unions contracts, marketing and sales presentations and including distribution plans for potential projects.  Relevant producing software is taught and utilized. Laboratory fee required

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

class='sc-courselink' href='/en/Current/catalog/Course-Descriptions/FMX-Film-Animation-and-New-Media/200/FMX-240'>FMX 240 or FMX 241, or consent of instructor.

FMX 343 Advanced Post-Production

A studio production course that teaches advanced creative and technical possibilities of motion picture editing using the University's advanced digital editing facilities. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FMX 241, or consent of the instructor.

FMX 363 Webisode Production and Distribution

A studio production course that introduces students to the necessary software, and methodology used for writing, shooting and editing the web series for distribution.  Students will write a web series, shoot, edit, and distribute the pilot episode of their web series.  May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

One of the following: class='sc-courselink' href='/en/Current/catalog/Course-Descriptions/FMX-Film-Animation-and-New-Media/200/FMX-240'>FMX 240 and FMX 241 or consent of instructor.

FMX 374 Internship in FMX

Inquiry based on experience working in the related field.  May be repeated for credit.  Students gain experiential credit for working within the field in a variety of available positions.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Sophomore standing or higher with GPA 3.0

FMX 381 Digital Imaging

A studio production course that simultaneously explores digital based photography and digital manipulation of imagery. Relevant history, theory and aesthetics of related media are presented, along with discussions of the societal impact that digital imaging has introduced. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 210 or FMX 241

FMX 382 Global Perspectives in Film and New Media

This unique course integrates a film, animation and new media seminar with a workshop component. It provides the opportunity for in-depth discussion and inquiry in to film, animation and new media in relationship to a variety of theoretical, cultural and historical topics covering artists, museums and exhibits world-wide. Students respond to course material through social media, blogs and personal research in digital format related to topics covered in the class. Varying subjects of study cover Europe, Asia, Oceania and the Americas.
Credit Hours: 2,4
(IG) (HFA)

FMX 382A Global Perspectives in Film and New Media Travel Course

This travel course is open to all students interested in learning and exploring historical movements and current trends in Film, Animation and New Media. Focusing on experiential learning, students will visit cities, museums, institutions and events that are relevant to the fields of Film, Interactive Media, Animation and New Technologies. Varying destinations include Europe, Asia, Oceania and the Americas.
Credit Hours: 2
(IG) (HFA) (T)

Prerequisites

FMX 382 Global Perspectives in Film and New Media

FMX 385 Special Topics in FMX

A course offered at the discretion of the FMX department.  Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, or topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.  May be repeated for credit, if the topic is different.

Credit Hours: 4

FMX 392 Independent Study in FMX

Independent project developed under the guidance of a Film, Animation, and New Media Instructor.  Students will apply by submitting a project proposal to an FMX professor for 1-4 credits.  May be repeated for variable credits of 1-4 hours per course.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior standing and minimum GPA of 3.0, and consent of instructor.

FMX 398 Junior Portfolio Review

The Junior Portfolio Review is for students in one of the following: BFA in Film and Media Arts, BFA in Animation, BFA in Digital Arts, BFA in New Media, or BA in New Media Production programs only. The review of on-line portfolios developed within the Professional Seminar, will be made by made by at least two FMX faculty members, and / or guest evaluators. It is a zero-credit course taken concurrent with Professional Seminar, during the second semester sophomore year (after completing 44 credits, before 60 credit hours in the major). The review provides feedback and identifies areas of improvement.

Credit Hours: 0
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: FMX 298. Earned 44 credits, or more. Or permission of instructor.

FMX 410 Special Topics in Digital and New Media

A studio production course that allows faculty and/or professionally oriented students to intensively explore topics in digital & new media.  May be repeated for additional credit, with a maximum of 6 credits total.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FMX 417 Special Topics in Animation

A studio production course that allows faculty and/or professionally oriented students to select and intensively explore topics in animation.  May be repeated for additional credit, with a maximum of 6 credits total.

Credit Hours: 1-6
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FMX 430 Spatial Computing

This studio production course offers a hands-on approach to exploring the methods through which humans communicate with computers and interact with physical and virtual spaces. Students will create works that explore self-expression and interaction with analog and virtual interfaces, in tangible, digital, or expanded realities. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 310, or permission of the instructor.

FMX 440 Screenwriting Features

Screenwriting Features will deepen students’ understanding of the craft of screenwriting by deep analysis of structure and form of feature screenplays and other long-form screenwriting, and by planning and executing a narrative feature length screenplay. This is a writing intensive course, and may be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities, if not used in the major.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

FMX 340

FMX 460 Senior Seminar in Film and Digital Production

A studio production capstone course for seniors to complete a thesis film production as the requirement for graduation in the film and media arts degree programs.  Pre-production and production of the senior thesis project will be completed by the end of the semester.  Students pursue production projects of sufficient breadth and depth as to crystallize their experiences at the University.  Should be taken two semesters prior to graduation (fall semester, for spring graduation; spring semester for fall graduation). Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing in the Film and Media Arts major and any one of the following: FMX 312, FMX 313, or FMX 314, or consent of instructor.

FMX 463 Multimedia Installation

A studio production course that introduces students to contemporary multimedia installation through both the study of the cutting-edge practitioners within the field and through the production of related projects. Modes of production covered include digital video projection, audio installation, mixed, virtual and augmented reality, and hybrid combinations of the above. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 241 or permission of the instructor.

FMX 492 Independent Study in FMX

Independent project developed under the guidance of a Film, Animation and New Media instructor.  Students will apply by submitting a project proposal to a FMX professor for 1-4 credits. May be repeated for variable credits of 1-4 hours per course.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.0, or consent of instructor.

FMX 499 Senior Project in FMX

A studio production mandatory capstone course for Animation or New Media majors. Each student will create a creative thesis project in their major area that demonstrates the depth and breadth of their learning, leading to exhibition of this work.  This course is required to be taken in students' final semester in the program, and that they exhibit and present their thesis work during the scheduled showcase. Laboratory fee required.

Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA/ST)

Prerequisites

FMX 398 and senior standing in Animation or New Media major, after completion of 106 credits, or consent of instructor.

FRE 101 Elementary French I

Beginning French with an emphasis on French culture, as well as understanding and speaking French in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. This course is only open to students who have successfully completed one year of French or less in secondary school, within the previous eight years, and no university French. Students cannot take FRE 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

FRE 102 Elementary French II

Beginning French with an emphasis on French culture, as well as understanding and speaking French in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 101 (or equivalent skills) is a prerequisite for FRE 102. May be taken after FRE 105 with instructor permission. Students cannot take FRE 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

FRE 105 Elementary French Review

Review of French for students who have studied the language in high school for at least two years. Emphasis on accelerated grammar and on speaking. Listening comprehension, reading and writing are included.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. May not be taken after FRE 101. Students cannot take FRE 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

FRE 151 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 201 Intermediate French I

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of French culture and everyday French, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 102 or/and FRE 105, three or more years of high school French, or equivalent skills required for FRE 201. Students cannot take FRE 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

FRE 202 Intermediate French II

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of French culture and everyday French, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of French. FRE 201 or equivalent skills required for FRE 202. Students cannot take FRE 101, 102, 105, 201, or 202 concurrently.

FRE 251 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 271 UT in Paris

The students will study the history of France through the development of Paris throughout the centuries. The city will be presented in a chronological fashion, by studying its monuments and lesser-known landmarks (these are oftentimes archaeological remains Parisians walk by every day without noticing them). These landmarks will be discussed in class and visited in Paris.

Emphasis will be put on how Parisians interact with their history every day, framing their mindset in the process. Students will be able to experience these interactions in Paris and therefore better comprehend the French way of life. The course will be conducted entirely in French. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills

FRE 300 Advanced French I

Emphases in Advanced French I are on oral expression, reading and vocabulary building.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to students who received their secondary education in the French language. FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French or equivalent skills.

FRE 301 Advanced French II

Emphases in Advanced French II are on writing, vocabulary building and grammar.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to students who received their secondary education in the French language. FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French or equivalent skills.

FRE 308 French Pop Culture

This course explores the current state of French pop culture by studying various pieces including novels, comic books, television shows, songs and films.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 310 Diplomatic French

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of French in a diplomatic setting. Emphasis is made on writing, as well as listening and speaking skills through the use of specialized vocabulary, simulations and paired activities.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills

FRE 311 Commercial French

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of French in a business setting. It provides a basis from which students will learn about culturally appropriate business practices in France and in the Francophone world.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 320 French Cinema

A broad survey of French cinema from the silent era through the present covering the history and evolution of French filmmaking through the viewing and analysis of its masterworks.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent, or four or more years of high school French, or equivalent skills.

FRE 322 Literature of the Francophonie

An introduction to the literature of La Francophonie through the close reading of texts by authors from Canada, Africa and the Antilles.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 331 Introduction to French Literature

A reading and discussion of selections by master writers of French literature.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 332 The French Language in Contact

An examination of the evolution of the French language in the Hexagone and in the French diaspora (North America, Africa, Haiti, etc). In particular the themes of regional and social variation, standardization and bilingualism will be explored.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills.

FRE 351 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRE 371 UT in Paris

The students will study the history of France through the development of Paris throughout the centuries. The city will be presented in a chronological fashion, by studying its monuments and lesser-known landmarks (these are oftentimes archaeological remains Parisians walk by every day without noticing them). These landmarks will be discussed in class and visited in Paris.

Emphasis will be put on how Parisians interact with their history every day, framing their mindset in the process. Students will be able to experience these interactions in Paris and therefore better comprehend the French way of life.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

FRE 202 or equivalent skills

FRE 421 French Culture and Civilization

An integrated picture of the political, economic, social, geographical and cultural forces that have shaped France and the Francophone world.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

One 300-level French course or equivalent skills.

FRE 451 Topics in French

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

FRT 250 French Literature in English Translation

A study of great themes and values expressed by selected authors and movements in French literature. Course and readings are in English.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

FSC 130 Survey of Forensic Sciences

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the most common disciplines in forensic science topics in forensic science that will be covered in more depth in higher-level courses. Topics may include: legal underpinnings of forensic science, crime scene investigation, fingermarks/fingerprints, firearms evidence, trace evidence (glass, fibers, and hair), seized drugs, forensic toxicology, forensic pathology, forensic serology, forensic DNA analysis, ignitable liquids, and explosives. Expert forensic practitioners will act as guest lecturers in their respective disciplines. Lecture only.
Credit Hours: 3

FSC 230 Fire Debris and Firearms

An introduction to the principles of and forensic evidence relevant to arson, explosives, and firearms. The first half of the course focuses on the science of fire and explosives as well as methods for the analysis of relevant evidence. The second half of the course provides the principles of firearms and methods used for characterization of firearms evidence.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 154 and CHE 155L (both with a grade of “C” or better)

FSC 340 Microscopic Examination of Firearms Evidence

This course is designed to provide hands-on experience in firearms evidence examination, with a focus on microscopic methods. The course will explore common types of firearms evidence such as cartridge casings, bullets, bullet fragments, shot pellets, and gunshot residues. Students will compare fired bullets and cartridges with unknown samples, primarily using comparison microscopy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

FSC 230

FSC 461 Forensic Science Seminar

Provides experience in reviewing the scientific literature, scientific writing, and presentation. The products of the course are a manuscript and presentation reviewing the scientific literature in a topic of forensic science. The course culminates in students presenting their work for the faculty and/or forensic practitioners.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

FSC 130, CHE 234, CHE 235L, and CHE 310 (each with a grade of “C” or better).

GEO 102 World Regional Geography

This course provides an overview of the landforms, climate, ecology, populations, economy, politics, and cultures of the regions of the world. Through attention to particular regions and their inter-relations, we will examine global issues such as development, migration, inequality, urbanization, nationalism, conflict, trade, and climate change.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

GEO 205 Principles of Resource Utilization

This course examines theories, conflicts, and crises in global natural resource utilization. We will explore the causes of looming social and ecological threats and opportunities in areas such as global warming, food security, water wars, pollution, biodiversity, inequality, and development. We will evaluate debates over population and scarcity, commodities and institutions, environmental ethics, political economy, and socio-ecological change, and use them to inform our understandings of the promises and pitfalls of proposed personal, cultural, economic, and political solutions to resource dilemmas.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

GEO 207 Economic Geography

Why are some areas wealthy and some areas poor? Why do particular kinds of economic activities cluster in regions like Silicon Valley, Wall Street, and China’s Pearl River Delta? How do landscape, politics, and culture shape economic fortunes? There are spatial-geographic dimensions to all global economic activities: resource extraction, production, work, logistics, consumption, finance, debt, technological innovation, migration, and social reproduction. Considering geographic scales from the household division of labor up through global commodity chains, we'll explore the historical development, current dilemmas, and future directions of the world economy— with an eye towards crucial questions of growth, sustainability, and justice.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

GEO 235 GIS Mapmaking for the Social Sciences

This course presents the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will learn how to design and create digital maps and will master the basic techniques of spatial analysis. We will use maps and other GIS tools to uncover the hidden geo-spatial relationships that shape the world around us. Through lectures, discussion and hands-on exercises and projects, the course will explore the many applications of GIS in the social sciences and environmental sciences as well as in the humanities, public policy and urban affairs.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

GEO 240 Cultural Geography

How are our identities, cultures and social relationships shaped by the physical world around us? How, in turn, do our cultural patterns come to shape our natural and built environments? This course provides an overview of cultural geography. It covers the basics as well as new developments in cultural geographic theory. The main aim is to understand relationships between cultures and environments through geographical analyses of social processes, landscapes, cultural meanings, place-making and identities. We will examine questions of power, performance, diffusion, diversity, hybridity, homogenization, hegemony, conflict, expression and resistance through case studies of local, regional and global spatial-cultural dynamics.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

GEO 250 Urban Geography: Cities in Global Context

How do cities grow and change? What environmental, economic, social, and political forces bring them into being? Why are they the source of so much of the world’s economic and cultural dynamism and at the same time the site of so much dysfunction and conflict? In this course we will use writing to investigate the geographic contours of key urban challenges such as economic development, segregation, inequality, housing, slum growth, gentrification, environmental justice, violence, downsizing, and urban sprawl. We will wrestle with the opportunities and constraints facing urban reformers and city planners, and explore visions of urban social justice and sustainability.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

GEO 401 Field Work

This course involves practical work in placements with organizations such as non-profits, businesses, government agencies, museums, or archives. Requires permission of the History Department Chair. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. This course counts towards the Geography Minor.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

one GEO course.

GER 101 Elementary German I

Not open to native speakers. Beginning German with an emphasis on German culture, as well as understanding and speaking German in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of German. This course is only open to students who have successfully completed one year or less of German in secondary school within the previous eight years, and no university German. Students cannot take GER 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

GER 102 Elementary German II

Not open to native speakers. Beginning German with an emphasis on German culture, as well as understanding and speaking German in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

GER 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of German. Students cannot take GER 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

GER 201 Intermediate German I

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of German culture and everyday German, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

GER 102 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of German. Students cannot take GER 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

GER 202 Intermediate German II

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of German culture and everyday German, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

GER 201 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of German. Students cannot take GER 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

GER 251 Topics in German

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

GER 351 Topics in German

Content varies. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

GIS 099 Certificate in International Studies

Participation in the CIS program is tracked through official enrollment in GIS 099-1 each semester. This course is conducted on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.  Final grades in GIS 099 each semester depend on the successful completion of the CIS program requirements as outlined in the catalog.
Credit Hours: 0

GIS 499 Global Senior Capstone

The Global Senior Capstone Course is graded and serves to integrate and synthesize all the international/intercultural experiences of students enrolled in the Certificate of International Studies. This course is reflection/based, and will serve to focus upon the transformative aspects of the student’s entire CIS experience. (i.e. achieving intermediate level proficiency in a second language, completing 12-16 credit hours of courses with substantive global dimensions, experiencing education-abroad, participating in international activities and events and assembling a portfolio.) In this course, students will present their assembled and completed portfolios and the student and CIS advisor will link the content to an appropriate career strategy for the student.
Credit Hours: 0-1

HIS 102 World History to 1500

This course examines topics from the Paleolithic Era to the dawn of the Age of Globalization, including: early foraging, pastoral, and agricultural societies; the emergence of urban societies in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; trade and cultural transmission; concepts of gender; technological transfers; and the emergence of transcontinental and global interconnections through the Saharan trade, the Pax Mongolica, and Malay, Chinese and Iberian ocean explorations. Equally importantly, the course introduces students to the methods of the historian, involving critical thinking, the analysis of source texts, and the use of evidence to address historical questions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 103 World History from 1500 to the Present

This course examines topics from the 16th through 20th centuries, including: state-building, commerce, and society in Eurasia and Africa; the creation and integration of the Atlantic World; new ideologies; industrial revolutions; changing conceptions of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and nation; political revolutions, genocides, and wars; imperialism and decolonization; and the global impact of the Cold War. Equally importantly, the course engages students in the methods of the historian, involving critical thinking, the analysis of source texts, and the use of evidence to address historical questions.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 201 The Historian's Craft

This course introduces undergraduate majors and minors to the exercise of thinking, researching and writing historically, focusing on the technical, methodological and theoretical skills that guide professional practice in diverse settings: museums, archives, secondary education and universities. Students will learn how to distinguish between evidence and interpretation and how to assess different kinds of evidence. Class meetings will sample representative fields, approaches and primary sources to provide the foundations for independent research in the capstone course.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

History Major or Minor

HIS 202 The United States to 1877

Surveys the cultural, political, social and economic developments in this country from the discovery of America through Reconstruction.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 203 The United States Since 1877

Surveys the urbanization and industrialization of the nation and its rise to world power.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 204 Twentieth Century Europe

European History in the 1900s.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 205 Native American Histories: Colonialism and Resistance

A survey of the history of Native Americans in the Caribbean, North America, and South America from the pre-Columbian period through the twentieth century. By focusing comparatively on the themes of colonialism and resistance over five centuries, students will study the range of tactics that Native Americans have adopted to create and preserve their communities, cultures, and sovereignty since 1492.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 206 Slavery and Racism in the Early Americas: A Comparative Perspective

A study of the development of slavery and relations between European Americans and African Americans in British, Spanish, and Portuguese America from the beginning of European settlement in the New World until the abolition of slavery in the mid-19th century.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 212 Witchcraft and Magic in the Early Modern Atlantic World

A study of the development of witchcraft accusations, beginning with continental Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries and continuing with the later scares in England and New England. Particular emphasis will be given to international comparisons and to the changing social, cultural and economic positions of women.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 215 Women in American History

A survey of women's accomplishments, lifestyles, changing image and struggle for equality and recognition from colonial times to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

HIS 217 China's Centuries of War and Revolution: since 1800

Napoleon Bonaparte said: “China is a sleeping giant. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will move the world.” This course will explore how prophetic his words were by exploring China’s often torturous search for modernity. It surveys the interplay between China and the outside world from before the Opium War through the collapse of two millennia of dynastic rule, the rise of the Communist movement, decades of Japanese aggression, the Maoist years of almost constant revolution, and its gradual transition to a socialist-style entrepreneurial state, and its emergence on the world stage as a major power.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 201

HIS 218 History of the Islamic World

A study of Muslims in world history from the 7th to the 21st centuries. This course explores the history of Islamic societies and of Muslims in local and global contexts, including the Middle East, Africa, Central and South Asia, and the West. The course addresses selected topics such as politics and statecraft; religious and cultural traditions and varieties; gender roles; and the challenges and choices that Muslim societies and individuals have faced in classical, early modern, and modern times. Materials include film, fiction and political writing as well as primary historical documents and secondary history textbooks.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 219 Mistaken Identities: Myths and Realities of the New World Encounter

The term “discovery” is an ambivalent and charged word when discussing the arrival, military occupation and colonization of the Americas during the late 15th and 16th centuries. Who discovered whom in 1492 and what were the economic, demographic, ecological, political and cultural consequences brought about by the New World/Old World encounter? How were Europe and the Americas transformed by this seminal event, and how were the foundations of modern Latin America (and modern Western civilization) laid during this fascinating period? These questions and many others will be studied and analyzed through exposure to the primary texts and artifacts of that era, in an attempt to understand the Spanish and Indigenous mindset on the eve of conquest and their mutual transformation throughout the 16th century, when a New World — a world still in formation — was born.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (W)

HIS 220 Introduction to African History

An exploration of the history of Africa from the rise of the great Sahel empires to the struggle for independence from European imperialism, with an emphasis on the period from 1500 to 1975. Major topics include the role of Islam, colonialism, nationalist movements, Pan-Africanism, decolonization and the challenges facing newly independent states and societies.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 221 Japan's Modern Centuries

This course surveys Japanese history from the coming of the Western gunboats in the 1850s through the Meiji restoration, the early development of international trade and democracy, the rise of militarism in the 1930s, World War II, the American Occupation, the economic "miracle" and the troubled 2000s.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS) (W)

HIS 225 The Age of the Civil War

A study of mid-19th century America, with particular emphases on the political developments, changing regional economies, patterns of interracial, interethnic and interclass relationships, as well as the course of military events during the Civil War.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 227 China and the World to 1800

China is frequently represented as a monolithic civilization, ethnocentric, and static in pre-modern times. This course challenges those stereotypes. It is a descriptive and analytical survey of China’s dynamic history from its historical origins in the 2nd millennium to 1800. It focuses on the evolution of the state, emphasizing cultural and political interactions with both neighboring and more distant societies. It further examines how China’s civilization influenced the emergence of the East Asian family of nations. This is a writing intensive course in which writing is a mode of learning and written assignments are a substantial part of the course grade.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 201

HIS 228 Traditional Japan

This course examines the history of Japan from its pre-historical origins until the rise of modern Japan in the mid-nineteenth century. Special focus is given to indigenous Japanese beliefs, the influence of Chinese political and social values on Japanese life, Buddhist religious culture, the military ethos of the samurai, and the material cultural and artistic achievements of the Tokugawa period. In addition to a conventional textbook, literature and film are used to immerse students in the worldviews of traditional Japan. Group work and collaborative learning is emphasized. 

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (SS)

HIS 229 History of Sexuality

This course surveys major trends and turning points in the history of sexuality since 1500. We will examine the governing regimes (legal, religious, medical, etc.) that defined sexual behavior and reproductive practices in mainland North America, paying particular attention to the changing relationship between sexual regulation and politics over time. The course will also explore the ways that official pronouncements differed from the actual practices and perceptions of ordinary woman and men. We will ask how factors such as race and ethnicity, class, and gender shaped sexual understandings and behavior.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 236 Latin America

A study of Latin American history from the colonial period to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 256 The Era of World War I

The course traces the diplomatic and economic events leading to the outbreak of war in 1914 and follows the progress of the war, revolution and peace.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 257 The Era of World War II

The course traces the political, economic, social and diplomatic events leading to the outbreak of hostilities and the military and diplomatic aspects of the war itself. It concludes with the Nuremburg Trials.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 260 The Holocaust

This course covers the persecution and systematic extermination of Jews, Romany, Slavs and other targeted populations of Europe by the Nazis and their collaborators. The course will explore antisemitism in modern European history, the ways in which antisemitism was legalized in Nazi Germany and the consequences of those policies in Nazi-occupied Europe. 

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

one HIS course

HIS 265 The Origins of Western Thought in Ancient Greece

Western civilization traces its intellectual roots to the civilization of Ancient Greece and the extraordinary contribution that it produced in philosophy, drama, and the arts. This course will explore some of the important philosophical texts from Ancient Greece, including the dialogues of Plato (the Last Days of Socrates and The Republic); the dramatic literature found in the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; and the arts, with focus on the human body and architecture, in particular, the Parthenon. The class will be structured as a seminar, asking the question: How does Ancient Greece continue to shape our thinking in the 21st century?
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 266 Coming to America: The Immigrant Experience in History, Fiction and Film

The stories of immigration to America by peoples from Asia, Europe and Latin America — whether in history, fiction or film — examine the motives for leaving homeland and family, the experience of newcomers and the process of assimilation into an evolving American culture over time. While the stores have similarities in outline, there are significant cultural differences for each people. This course will examine the immigrant experience of the Chinese, the Jews and the Mexicans, using a major work of history, a novel and three films for each group.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 269 Paris in the 1920s: The Cultural Impact of the Great War

In the 1920s, Paris became the center of an avant garde artistic and cultural community that demonstrated the profound impact of World War I, and has, in turn, shaped art and culture to the present. This course uses period poetry and fiction, memoir, biography and film to evoke the lives and contributions of select iconic figures: poets Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot; writers Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; painters Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali; composer Igor Stravinsky, dancer Vaslav Nijinsky and producer Sergei Diaghilev of the Ballet Russes; fashion entrepreneur Coco Chanel; and jazz sensation Josephine Baker.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 270 Hitler and Stalin

This course will weave together the biographies of the two most important revolutionaries of the twentieth century with an examination of the societies that they sought to create. We will try to understand what motivated Hitler and Stalin, how they seized and held power, and how they tried to impose their wills on Europe and the world.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 275 The Civil Rights Movement

This course focuses on the struggle for racial equality and freedom in the American South after World War II. It also helps students comprehend this struggle within the broader context of post-Civil War American race relations.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 285 America in the 1960s

This course covers the Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban missile crisis, the war in Vietnam, the concern about nuclear warfare, the civil rights movement, and the student movement of the late 1960s.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 290 Special Studies

Special courses are offered each year.

Credit Hours: 2-4
(SS)

HIS 292 Drama and Society in Elizabethan London

Drama flourished in Elizabethan London during a sustained period of economic prosperity, including the rise of the professional entertainment industry. While the Elizabethan theatre evolved from medieval public religious traditions, the plays of William Shakespeare demonstrate the pivotal role of the playhouse in the late 16th and early 17th centuries as cultural history, and a window to the world outside London. The course will provide perspective on the historical and cultural context of Elizabethan drama and will explore six of Shakespeare's plays -- both as texts and films -- from his emergence in 1589 through the end of his career in London in 1611.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (IG) (SS)

HIS 300 The Modern Middle East and North Africa

This course examines the Modern Middle East and North Africa from the 1500's to the era of modern revolutions and recent conflicts.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

One prior HIS course

HIS 302 Revolutionary Europe 1712 to 1919

Revolutionary thought and action in Europe from the birth of Jean-Jacques Rousseau to the death of Rosa Luxemburg. This course examines revolutionary ideas, groups, and individuals, from the French Revolution to the Russian Revolution and post-WWI Europe. Students will develop their abilities to write essays analyzing the ideas of the women and men who shaped Europe in the revolutionary era.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

Any two HIS courses, including one of the following: HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 202, HIS 203.

HIS 304 History of Florida

The objectives of this course are to develop historical analysis beyond the level of the lower-division survey and to introduce students to experiential learning within the arena of local history practice. Students should master the historiography that structures the study of Florida’s past, gaining an awareness of how, over time, political history, social history, spatial theory and transnational studies have altered state history. Student research topics will be drawn from local history sources and celebrations, encouraging community engagement as well as independent analysis.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 305 The Ancient World

HIS 305 surveys the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean world from the prehistory to the fall of the Roman Empires. Students will learn about the rise and fall of ancient and classical civilizations, their political and social institutions, their economic and trade practices, their religions and cultural traditions. Readings will be extensive and include text, scholarly articles, primary sources, art and archeology. This is a writing intensive class and students will be expected to produce papers in style of historical writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

One History course

HIS 306 The Middle Ages

A study of European society from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 308 Renaissance and Reformation

A study of the origins, progress, interrelationships and impact of new forms and ideas that characterized the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe from 1400 to 1650.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 317 China's Revolutionary Twentieth Century

This course examines China’s revolutionary century with a particular emphasis on four definitive events: the Boxer Rebellion (1900), the Communist revolution (1934-1949), the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) and the 1989 Democracy Movement. It explores both the cause and course of these revolutions, how they become embedded in cultural memory and the ways in which they shaped state-society power relationships.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (SS) (W)

HIS 320 Museums, Historic Sites and Archives

This course offers an introduction to the methods and approaches that structure the presentation of history in public venues, including museums, historic venues and archives. Tools that facilitate collaboration between historians and communities to preserve local memory will also be examined. Finally, we will explore critically the political, financial and professional pressures that have shaped some of the most prominent displays of the nation’s past as well as the pressures that structure representations of history in Tampa. Students will attempt to reconcile these concerns by crafting exhibition proposals that would allow a local museum to engage multiple history publics.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 321 Revolutionary America

A study of the history of the United States before, during and after the Revolutionary War. Focuses on the role of ideology and the patterns of change in religion, racial relations and the status of women.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

HIS 322 Spanish Caribbean and its Diasporas

This course surveys the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic) from the Taino world of the pre-Columbian period to today. Topics include the creation of colonial plantation societies and the rise of sugar and coffee economies; movements for abolition, reform, and national self-determination; the persistence of Caribbean borderlands in the U.S. gulf south; the Caribbean’s neo-imperial economies, social structures, and political institutions; the impact of the Cuban Revolution; and the Caribbean’s tourist trade and diasporas in the global economy.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 323 Age of Revolutions in the Americas

A comparative study of the revolutions and independence movements that swept the Americas between 1776 and 1826, focusing on the American, Haitian, and Latin American Revolutions. Topics include the political, economic, social, and cultural changes experienced by white, black, and indigenous Americans.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

One History course

HIS 325 Narcotic Drugs and Modern Society

This course explores the history of narcotic drugs and modern society, focusing on America. The course also examines the history of U.S. drug policy.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 326 The History of U.S. Foreign Relations

Studies the formulation of American foreign policy and issues in American diplomatic history.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

HIS 332 Imperialism and Nationalism in Asia and Africa

This course examines the British rule in India as a case study of how imperial rule is imposed and maintained, and the Indian independence movement as a model of colonial resistance.  It then examines the different imperial systems imposed on Africa, the struggle by African colonies for self-determination, and their search for identity and stability after independence.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 201

HIS 335 U.S. Constitutional History

This class broadly surveys the chronological span of U.S. Constitutional history, from the 18th century to the 1970s, studying Supreme Court decisions and dissenting opinions as primary documents that can be used to understand the past. Students will determine how relationships between people and legal regimes changed over time, and they will assess the ways that specific political, economic, social and cultural contexts affected the development of American constitutional thought, the role of the Supreme Court and the evolving relations between law and society.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

One History survey course (HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 202 or HIS 203)

HIS 400 History Capstone Research Seminar

This course represents the culmination of the History major. With the guidance of the instructor, students consider historiographical and methodological models and carry out a complete research project related to a common theme or body of source material. This course is normally taken in the Senior year. 
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

HIS 201 and one HIS course numbered 300 or above.

HIS 401 Field Work

Involves practical work in museums, historical preservation and historical archives. Requires permission of area coordinator. Graded on a pass/fail basis. This course counts as a history major elective.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 402 Natural and Unnatural Disasters in Modern World History

This course investigates the impact of catastrophes — earthquakes, epidemics, hurricanes, fires, accidents — on society, politics and culture in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas since 1624. Natural disasters often transform relations between nations and among social groups, while revealing social conditions and cultural attitudes kept hidden under normal circumstances. Natural disasters can create the conditions for revolutions, lead to wars over scarce resources, provide pretexts for imperial intrusions and expose the inequalities and tensions in society. Students will develop their knowledge of world history and disaster studies by reading and writing about selected case studies.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

Any two History courses.

HIS 450 Independent Study

Involves guided readings, research and criticism.  Materials covered must be different from those included in current courses.  May be repeated for credit if subject matter varies.

Credit Hours: 2-4
(SS)

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, 12 hours of history. Independent studies must be taken under the direction of a full-time HIS professor. Subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.

HIS 451 Senior Thesis

A substantial research and writing project.  The subject matter must be determined through student-faculty consultation.  A senior thesis can be written under the guidance of any full-time professor in the HIS department.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

Senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA.

HIS 460 Advanced Special Topics

Advanced study of a selected historical topic. This course will count toward the upper-level requirement for the History major, and, depending on the topic, may fulfill other requirements, with approval of the Associate Chair for History, Sociology, Geography and Legal Studies. May be repeated for credit if the topic differs.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HON 101 Pathways to Honors 1

Introduces the student to the Honors Program; students learn the expectations and commitments that come with participation in Honors. Each course is uniquely connected to the scholarship of the faculty member teaching the course. Students are also introduced to the Honors Symposia series. Graded.
Credit Hours: 1

HON 102 Pathways to Honors 2

Introduces the student to the philosophical underpinnings of the Honors Program and begins developing the skills necessary to complete the Honors Program. Encourages students to explore Honors Program offerings and to continue their pursuit of experiential learning and undergraduate inquiry. Graded.
Credit Hours: 1

HON 220 Where Have We Been?

In this one-semester course, students explore the past by studying the foundations and development of various cultures’ sociopolitical, scientific, and historiographical foundational ideas from the dawning of time to the 20th century.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 230 Where Are We Now?

In this one-semester course, students explore the present by studying the foundations and development of various cultures’ sociopolitical and scientific foundational ideas in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 240 Where Are We Going?

In this one-semester, team-taught course, students will explore the future by studying cutting-edge thought innovations shaping tomorrow’s world.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 250 Topics in Honors

An introductory study of topics ranging in scope and content for Honors students. May be repeated if the content varies.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101.

HON 253 Idea Lab: Health Science/Natural Science

Idea labs are courses in thought experiments. In these courses, students will use critical inquiry to approach problems in either Health Science or Natural Science that present themselves locally (in Tampa Bay) or globally (in society).



Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 255 Idea Lab: Humanities/Fine Arts

Idea labs are courses in thought experiments. In these courses, students will use critical inquiry to approach problems in Humanities/Fine Arts that present themselves locally (in Tampa Bay) or globally (in society).




Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 257 Idea Lab: Social Science

Idea labs are courses in thought experiments. In these courses, students will use critical inquiry to approach problems in Social Science that present themselves locally (in Tampa Bay) or globally (in society).





Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101, HON 101, HON 102; Honors students only

Corequisites

AWR 201

HON 350 Topics in Honors

This is a special topics course at the 300 level. This course represents an advanced study of a topic or topics ranging in scope and content.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101.

HON 490 Honors Thesis

The Honors Thesis is a culminating project for Honors Program students. Honors Theses are discipline specific. The Honors Thesis independent study can be conducted under the guidance of any full-time faculty member at UT. Subject matter for the course will be determined through student-faculty consultation. The course may be taken multiple times for up to a total of 10 credit hours.
Credit Hours: 1-10

Prerequisites

Students must be in good standing in the Honors Program and must have completed 60 credit hours of course work.

HSC 100 Personal and Family Health

This course is a study of personal and family health and wellness. It examines the dimensions of health and recommends practices for developing healthy lifestyles. It explores health determinants, lifestyle behaviors, and risk and resilience factors associated with chronic and communicable diseases.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 130 Medical Terminology

This course introduces the student to common word roots, prefixes and suffixes used by the medical and allied health professions. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to define common medical terminology by deciphering its parts.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 200 Introduction to Allied Health Professions

This course is required of all students enrolled in the pre-professional allied health concentrations.  This introductory course examines career opportunities, history and trends, and philosophical issues specific to healthcare.  Course content includes professional development, academic planning for graduate school, introduction to interprofessional education, and blood-bourse pathogen training. 

Credit Hours: 2

HSC 203 Nutrition

A study of nutritional status and the effect of eating habits and food consumption on society, families and individuals.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 220 Functional Anatomy

This is a one-semester course without lab that covers the structure and function of the human body on the cellular, systemic and organismal levels. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 230 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

A study of the structures and functions of the body, with special emphases on histology and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  Permission to retake the course during the fall and spring semesters after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

MAT160 must be completed with a grade C or better in order to enroll in HSC 230 and HSC 234.

HSC 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A study of the structure and functions of the body, with special emphases on the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiration, urinary and reproductive systems.  Permission to retake the course during the fall and spring semesters after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 230 with a C or better.

HSC 234 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

This laboratory course introduces the students to hands-on exercises related to the structure and function of tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems (including dissections of cats and brains as well as physiological concepts).  Permission to retake the course during the fall and spring semesters after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 1

Corequisites

HSC 230 or permission of instructor.

HSC 235 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

This laboratory course introduces students to hands-on exercises related to structure and function of the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems (including dissections of cats, hearts, and kidneys as well as physiological concepts).  Permission to retake the course during the fall and spring semesters after having earned a letter grade in or having officially withdrawn from the course must be granted by the department chair.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

HSC 234 with a C or better.

Corequisites

HSC 231 or permission of instructor.

HSC 236 Introduction to Public Health

This course provides the student with a clear understanding of public health: the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health.

Credit Hours: 4

HSC 237 Determinants and Disparities in Health and Disease

By employing a biopsychosociocultural framework, this course introduces the public health student to the complex array of factors that influence human and population health and disease. It explains the relationship between health determinants and disparities in human and population health and explores strategies for promoting and protecting health and preventing disparities and inequities in health. Note: This course is designed to meet the accreditation standards of the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236

HSC 240 Global Disparities in Environmental Health

Environmental health comprises those aspects of human health, including quality of life, that are determined by physical, chemical, biological, social and psychosocial factors in the environment. World health resources are unequal between countries based on their history, resources, culture and government leadership. By examining global environmental health practices, students will synthesize cultural norms and the difficulties of solving health issues globally. This course explores global and cultural disparities in health; specifically food safety, water quality, air quality, vector-borne disease, occupational health, radiation, and unintentional injuries.
Credit Hours: 4

HSC 250 Emergency Medical Response

The content and lab activities in this course prepare students to work collaboratively, use critical thinking and make appropriate decisions about the care to provide in a medical emergency. The first responder skills taught include advanced first aid, single-responder-two-person responder and team CPR with AED training, administering supplemental oxygen, prevention of infectious disease transmission including OSHA bloodborne pathogen and exposure control planning. Red Cross certification(s) in Emergency Medical Response First Aid and Basic Life Support for Health Care Professionals may be earned. Permission is required to enroll in this course. Lab fees required.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

HSC 220 or HSC 230 with a C or better.

HSC 296 Independent Study in Health Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.
Credit Hours: 1-8

HSC 299 Special Topics in Health Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. Subjects may focus on health science topics of current interest in the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.
Credit Hours: 3-4

HSC 310 Human Development Across the Lifespan

This course introduces students to psychological, social, and learning needs in the context of human development theories and stages, from conception through end of life.
Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Allied Health major

HSC 340 Qualitative Research Methods

This course introduces students to the field of qualitative research and prepares them in the skills, techniques, and knowledge necessary to undertake independent research using this methodology. It will provide classroom and field application of qualitative research methods for studying community health problems. It provides a general introduction to ethnographic field methods, emphasizing systematic approaches to collection and analysis of qualitative data. Students will learn to identify the kinds of research problems for which qualitative methods are appropriate, and to critique, qualitative research in terms of design, technique, analysis and interpretation.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236.

HSC 350 Biostatistics

This course provides the student with an overview of health science research and data analysis, the organization and summarization of data, and drawing inferences about the characteristics of sample data. Conceptual topics include study design, descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, power and sample size, inferential statistics, and decision-making. Statistical techniques include prevalence, incidence, odds ratio, relative risk, sensitivity, specificity, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and variability, measures of bivariate association (Pearson, Spearman, Chi-square), independent samples and paired samples (t-tests), between groups design (one-way and two-way ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA and multivariable regression.



Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ESC 110 or HSC 200 or HSC 236

HSC 355 Research Methods in Health Education and Promotion

This course is designed to provide a solid research foundation to students interested in health education and health promotion emphasizing systematic approaches to the application of research methods, designs and data collection strategies. Students will understand and apply ethical standards related to health education research, develop pertinent research questions and hypotheses, develop proposals, design data collection instruments, identify and critique research in terms of design, technique, analysis and interpretation, as well as explore and practice research dissemination. This course is writing intensive. Thus, informal and formal writing instruction and production will occur to develop effective scholarly writing and research reports.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

HSC 350

HSC 360 Principles of Epidemiology in Exercise and Public Health

This course provides the student with an overview of morbidity and mortality surveillance by understanding disease etiology, distribution, and control. The course focuses on disease surveillance related to exercise, rehabilitation, public and community health through both descriptive and analytical methods. Students will examine and discuss cohort, case and experimental studies to further illustrate epidemiological concepts including study design, disease distribution (e.g., outbreaks), measures of disease frequency, and determinants of disease, disability, condition, and injury.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ESC 110 or HSC 200 or HSC 236

HSC 371 Fundamentals of Pharmacology

Lecture/discussion course emphasizing an understanding of the basic principles of pharmacology specifically aimed at the needs of allied health professionals. The application of these principles to drug categories commonly encountered by allied health professionals is covered.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

CHE 150 or 152 and permission of the instructor.

HSC 375 Health Education Theory and Strategies

This course provides a foundation of major theories and models focused on the development, implementation, and evaluation of health education interventions. Theories and models focused on individual health behavior, interpersonal health behavior, and community behaviors will be addressed. The course focuses on public health issues, social determinants of health, health risk behaviors, and intervention strategies. The course includes trends in morbidity and mortality and factors that correlate with these trends. The course introduces data on health risks associated with behaviors such as smoking, poor diet, sedentary lifestyle, and substance abuse and introduces various strategic approaches for developing behavioral interventions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236

HSC 380 Materials and Methods in Health Education and Health Promotion

This course is designed for students interested in obtaining a strong foundation related to health education and health promotion development and methods through the preparation, presentation and evaluation of health education and promotion topics. Students will learn to design, deliver and evaluate health education and promotion topics in a situational and contextually appropriate manner.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 375

HSC 401 Interprofessional Global Health and Service

This course will utilize an experiential, evidence-based model of learning and building on global health competencies. This experiential learning course will enable students to "learn by doing." The primary goal of this experience is to enable the students to contribute toward a better quality of life for all people, especially those who are vulnerable, underserved, marginalized and disadvantaged. The course will focus on providing content and skills necessary to collaboratively plan and implement a service learning project that will address a community need.

Credit Hours: 3

HSC 420 Nutritional Supplements

This course addresses contemporary issues in the usage of dietary supplements and sports performance aids, including vitamin and mineral supplements, herbs and botanicals promoted to the general public and to the athlete. The focus is to use the scientific method to evaluate product and research literature and health claims, when it is known that data are often likely to be incomplete or inconclusive. The course also reviews safety data, adverse event reports and legal issues involving dietary supplements.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

One of the following, HSC 203, HSC 230, NUR 432, CHE 232, BIO 330, BIO 360, or permission of the instructor.

HSC 440 Health Policy and Social Change

This course provides key concepts and knowledge regarding how health policy is formulated, enacted, and implemented. The course analyzes health policy by focusing on how and why health policy is developed at the federal, state and local levels. The course begins with a brief overview of the concepts and theories associated with public policy development in the health sector. The main emphasis will be upon providing the tools with which to understand how both public and private institutions produce health policy in its various forms. This course should provide a practical background to the study of health policy.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236.

HSC 445 Program Planning and Evaluation in Health Promotion and Education

This course will introduce students to the development, implementation and evaluation strategies that address health promotion issues at multiple levels. The course will provide a strong foundation of theories and conceptual frameworks used to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion from an ecological perspective - encompassing the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, social and policy levels.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236, HSC 375.

HSC 446 Public Health Systems

This course is intended to provide students with an This course integrates multiple perspectives of public health case studies. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research and work in groups to understand and discuss varying lens approaches to public health issues.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 350, HSC 360, HSC 240, HSC 440 and HSC 445.

HSC 450 Public Health Management and Leadership

This course develops the student's ability to: 1) work with organizations and communities; 2) develop skills to mobilize resources and the organizational and community capacity to address public health challenges and achieve the national health objectives; and 3) enable participation and leadership in a network that fosters the future of public health. The course exposes students to concepts and theories of leadership, performance improvement, organizational behavior, marketing, operations, organizational strategy and continuous quality improvement. The general management perspective is emphasized.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

HSC 236.

HSC 470 Health Science Lab Practicum

An upper-level course for those looking to go onto professional/graduate school and/or those who would benefit from experiential learning in teaching various aspects of a laboratory course. Through direct involvement both in and out of the classroom, students gain hands-on knowledge of instruction in a health science laboratory. Under the supervision of the faculty, students participate in all aspects of teaching a semester long laboratory class. This may include, but is not limited to, presenting materials in the introductory component of each laboratory, working with students during laboratory hours, holding office hours, holding review sessions in the laboratory, creating and evaluating testing components, and laboratory preparation and maintenance. Counts as a general elective only.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

HSC 230, HSC 231, HSC 234 and HSC 235 (all w/grade of "B" or better), and instructor permission.

HSC 480 Internship in Allied Health

This is an instructional, field-based experience in the allied health occupations for the pre-professionals. Both directed and self-directed experiences are required under the supervision of a certified/licensed allied health care practitioner in an approved health care setting. Students must earn program coordinator approval, provide documentation of current immunizations, health screening and CPR certification, and make provisions for transportation to the clinical affiliation site. Minimum allowable number of clinical contact hours is 120. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 0-12

Prerequisites

Junior or senior status, permission of instructor and departmental approval.

HSC 485 Undergraduate Research in Health Sciences

This course is an experiential education course that focuses on conducting undergraduate research in health sciences and working along with a faculty member. The students will be engaged in project conception, background literature study, methodology, data collection, analyzing results and possible presentation of research to larger community. At least 2 hours a week is required for each credit hour. This course can be repeated for up to 8 credit hours.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor.

HSC 490 Internship in Public Health

This course integrates public health theory and practice in a professional setting. Students have the opportunity to apply concepts from core and concentration courses, conduct projects and interact with a range of health professionals. The student works with both faculty advisor and an academically and professionally qualified preceptor. This course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
Credit Hours: 2-6

Prerequisites

Permission of Instructor.

HSC 491 Seminar in Allied Health

This course encompasses professional topics and current issues in the allied health professions. A seminar style class including discussions, reviews of current literature, case studies and journal article critiques will be conducted.  Competencies of interprofessional education including ethics, leadership, and teamwork are delivered in the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Junior or Senior status; Allied Health major.

HSC 496 Independent Study in Health Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.
Credit Hours: 1-8

HSC 499 Special Topics in Allied Health

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Science and Human Performance Department. Subjects may focus on topics of current interest in the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours:

HSC 608 Research Methods in Health Science

This course will cover research designs and research methods for exercise and health related studies. In particular, this course will focus on qualitative, quantitative and mixed method research designs, data collection techniques and statistical analyses. This course builds on the basic knowledge of biostatistics to explore more advanced research analysis techniques with both parametric and nonparametric data. This course will enable the student to develop instruments that align with specific research questions/hypotheses.  Students will become knowledgeable of mixed methods research and a greater understanding of the usage of one design informing the other for more robust research endeavors.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 618 Professional Issues and the Practitioner

This course encompasses professional topics and current issues in exercise and nutrition science. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 627 Sports Supplements and Ergogenic Aids

This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of nutritional supplementation as it applies to body composition, performance (strength, endurance, power) and general health. The course will cover the major supplements touted to enhance energy, fat loss, strength, muscle, endurance, inflammatory status and the overall hormonal milieu.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 635 Special Topics in Exercise and Nutrition Science

This course is an exploration of one or more special topics in exercise and nutrition science. The course gives students a comprehensive overview of a specialized field in sports and/or nutrition.  May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 637 Sports Nutrition

This course provides students with an advanced understanding of the role that nutrition plays in the acute and chronic response to exercise. In-depth discussion of macro and micro nutrients are discussed as they relate to exercise and sport.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites

Must be admitted in the Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science program, or by instructor permission.

HSC 690 Practicum

The practicum provides clinical field based experiences in preparation for employment in the exercise and nutrition science related professions. Graduate students will gain insight into various practices, disciplines, techniques, administrative duties and clinical processes related to exercise and nutrition science.  Graduate students will provide documentation of their experience. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

By permission of the instructor.

HSC 696 Independent Study in Exercise Science

A course offered at the discretion of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Department. Eligible students are in the Masters of Exercise and Nutrition Science program. By permission of instructor and department chair. May include a practicum. May be taken for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-8

HSC 699 Comprehensive Exam

This course includes the master’s program comprehensive exam which must be satisfactorily completed to graduate with the MS Exercise and Nutrition Science degree.  The course also includes review for the comprehensive exam.  Satisfactory completion of this course will also help prepare those students who plan to take Certified Sports Nutritionist Exam (CISSN) offered by the International Society of Sports Nutrition but passage of the CISSN exam is not required for graduation from the MS program.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of all core courses in the M.S. in Exercise and Nutrition Science program with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater. By permission of the program director.

IBS 490 International Business Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May be used to satisfy the cross-cultural experience requirement of the IB major. Approval of the international business coordinator required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MGT 350, junior or senior standing and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

IBS 492 Seminar in International Business

Examines select economic, political and cultural aspects of specific countries through readings, lectures, research and travel abroad. Country selection varies with instructor. Travel abroad includes visits to foreign stock exchanges, universities, corporations and international organizations. The trip is required for course credit, and the cost of the trip is not included in tuition. May require class meetings during the last seven weeks of the spring semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

IBS 495 Special Topics in International Business

A course offered at the discretion of the Department of International Business. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

IBS 499 Independent Study in International Business

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 0-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the coordinator of international business and COB associate dean.

IBS 695 Special Topics in International Business

For graduate students only.  A course offered at the discretion of the coordinator of international business. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

IBS 699 Independent Study in International Business

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in international business.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA, written permission of department chair.

IST 100 Special Studies Abroad

Special courses are offered in conjunction with UT Travel Courses. Check descriptions published annually.
Credit Hours: 0-4

Corequisites

Must be linked with a UT Travel Course.

IST 200 Special Studies Abroad

Special courses are offered in conjunction with UT Travel Courses. Check descriptions published annually.
Credit Hours: 0-4

Corequisites

Must be linked with a UT Travel Course.

IST 291 Special Studies

Special courses are offered occasionally, including travel abroad experience. Check descriptions published annually.

Credit Hours: 2-4

IST 300 Special Studies Abroad

Special courses are offered in conjunction with UT Travel Courses. Check descriptions published annually.
Credit Hours: 0-4

Corequisites

Must be linked with a UT Travel Course.

IST 400 Special Studies Abroad

Special courses are offered in conjunction with UT Travel Courses. Check descriptions published annually.
Credit Hours: 0-4

Corequisites

Must be linked with a UT Travel Course.

IST 470 Senior Research Seminar in International Studies

A capstone course for international and cultural studies majors that focuses on the analysis of proposed solutions to contemporary global issues.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG)

Prerequisites

PSC 269, PSC 270. Only available to IST majors during their senior year.

ITA 101 Elementary Italian I

Not open to native speakers. Beginning Italian with an emphasis on Italian culture, as well as understanding and speaking Italian in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Italian. This course is only open to students who have successfully completed one year or less of Italian in secondary school within the previous eight years, and no university Italian. Students cannot take ITA 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

ITA 102 Elementary Italian II

Not open to native speakers. Beginning Italian with an emphasis on Italian culture, as well as understanding and speaking Italian in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Italian. Students cannot take ITA 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

ITA 201 Intermediate Italian I

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of Italian culture and everyday Italian, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 102 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of Italian. Students cannot take ITA 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

ITA 202 Intermediate Italian II

Not open to native speakers. Develops a greater understanding of Italian culture and everyday Italian, as well as speaking, reading and writing skills.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

ITA 201 or equivalent skills required. Not open to native speakers of Italian. Students cannot take ITA 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

ITA 251 Topics in Italian

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ITA 351 Topics in Italian

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

ITM 220 Management Information Systems

Students study the use of information systems in the operation of an organization. Topics include data and information, data visualization, business processes, the relationship of business processes with data, information and information systems, and ensuring the safety and the ethical use of data, information, and information systems. Students apply the knowledge acquired in this course to contemporary applications and in simulated business scenarios that incorporate information systems.

 
 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BUS 101 and BAC 100

ITM 251 Application Development

Studies the fundamentals of designing and writing computer programs to solve problems. Emphasizes the principles of software design, development, and testing. Using a pragmatic and hands-on approach, students will apply structured programming and object-oriented methods using contemporary programming languages.
Credit Hours: 4

ITM 280 Network and Cloud Infrastructure

This course provides an introduction to network and cloud computing infrastructures. Topics covered include network architectures, topology, routing, protocols, IP addressing, wireless networking, securing networks, virtualization and cloud computing. An introduction to the fundamentals of hardware, software and networks is provided. Course coverage includes infrastructure, platform and software as a service aspects of cloud computing. Labs offer students practical experience with a protocol analyzer, network diagramming tool and access to a large cloud service provider. Students work directly with cloud-based resources to include installing and configuring instances of different operating systems in a virtualized environment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

BAC 100.

ITM 318 Systems Analysis and Design

This course introduces students to analysis and design of business information systems. The course addresses the key concepts of user requirements, modeling and information systems project management. The course covers object-oriented requirements modeling approaches. A semester-long project provides students with the opportunity to integrate concepts in analyzing and designing an information system using a prototyping approach with a rapid application development tool. The project management component of the course exposes students to project feasibility analysis, project tracking, developing service requests and reporting minutes of meetings.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 319 Business Process Integration Using Enterprise Systems

This course focuses on integration of business processes across different functional areas in an organization. Students will learn about enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and their role in integrating business processes within and across organizations. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn how to configure business processes within an organization using a contemporary ERP system, SAP. The course provides students an opportunity to study and compare integration of business processes using ERP systems in two organizations which culminates in a research paper and presentation to the class. Case studies, business simulation, and business process modeling are used to enhance student understanding.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220, ACC 203.

ITM 350 Information Security Principles

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of information and cybersecurity.  It covers how to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of data and information systems that modern organizations depend upon.  The information security domains examined include network security, risk management, governance, physical security, cryptography, application development, business continuity and legal issues.  Special consideration is given to studying major security incidents and cybersecurity trends.  Students will learn about the threats and vulnerabilities facing computer systems and the tools and techniques used to secure them.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 360 Advanced Application Development

Building on ITM251, this course emphasizes advanced programming techniques using a contemporary programming language to develop business applications. Students complete hands-on exercises and an experiential project. 

 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251.

ITM 361 Operations Management

This course examines the short-and long-term decisions that are made in manufacturing and service systems relating to the operations function. Emphasis is placed upon maximizing productivity, improving quality and discussing key issues within operations which are of relevance in a firm’s ability to remain competitive in a global economy. The course also covers global supply chain management aspects such as outsourcing/offshoring and strategic use of information systems. Students are given realistic exercises and gain hands-on experience using a contemporary enterprise information system.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COB core requirements and MGT 330.

ITM 375 Information Security Standards, Risk Management and Compliance

This course prepares students to design, implement and maintain a robust information security program.  Students will be introduced to various standards that define best practices for creating and maintaining security policies, performing an enterprise risk assessment, business continuity/disaster recovery planning, and security incident response handling.  Students will also be exposed to the legal and regulatory requirements of a successful information security program.  A practical approach to learning these topics will be taken, requiring students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations in project work and report writing assignments.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

ITM 220

ITM 380 Network Security

An introduction to network security and cryptography.  Students learn about computer network configurations, devices, services, vulnerabilities and threats.  Topics include firewalls, intrusion prevention/detection systems, honeypots, wireless systems, remote connectivity, malware threats and common attack types.  Students design a network security architecture for an organization.  The course also covers cryptography topics including encryption methods, symmetric/asymmetric systems, hashing, public-key infrastructures and attack types.  Emphasis is placed on reinforcing concepts with hands-on, lab-based exercises.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 280

ITM 408 Data and Information Management

Studies fundamental concepts of data and information management with primary focus on database systems, including identifying organizational requirements, conceptual data modeling, logical and physical database design, SQL and database administration tasks. Other topics include business intelligence technologies, data quality management and emerging trends. This course requires completion of an application prototype on a currently popular DBMS.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220.

ITM 415 Digital Forensic & Software Security

This course explores secure software development and digital forensic analysis. For software security, we cover the most critical application security vulnerabilities and how to mitigate them. The methodologies of developing secure applications are addressed. Secure coding practices are introduced. Additionally, students learn how to conduct vulnerability scans against software as well as take precautionary steps to prevent exploitation. For digital forensics, we explore computer crime types, investigations, and evidence analysis from different devices and operating systems. Students gain experience using digital forensic tools. Understanding cyber risks facing critical national and global infrastructures is also treated.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251 and ITM 350.

ITM 419 Enterprise Architecture and Governance

The course continues with systems development in an enterprise environment with an emphasis on governance and strategy.  The course focuses on topics such as developing system and network architectures, capturing data, process and security requirements, designing user interfaces and documentation, implementing systems and planning for transition and training.  Moreover, the course covers international governance standards using case examples from global companies.  Governance topics include global strategy development, business alignment, strategic planning and other IS frameworks.  The course provides students with the opportunity to earn the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) designation, an internationally recognized professional certification.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 251 and ITM 318. Pre or Co-Requisite ITM 408.

ITM 450 Cybersecurity Capstone

A comprehensive and intense preparation for the Certified Information System Security Professional (CISSP) exam.  The course reviews the domains of the CISSP common body of knowledge.  Students sharpen test taking skills with practice questions.  A comprehensive exam is given that mimics an actual certification exam.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 350, ITM 375, ITM 380.

ITM 466 Business Intelligence and Analytics

The course focuses on the use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, and explanatory and predictive models to generate data-driven insight for decision-making and competitive strategy. Students gain knowledge and skills to manipulate and analyze large data sets. Topics include the strategic value of business intelligence and analytics, relevant concepts related to databases and data warehouses, data and text mining techniques, and business applications of data mining and analytics. Students use software tools to analyze large data sets.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 220 and QMB 210.

ITM 480 Ethical Hacking

Provides additional hands-on lab exercises that build upon the concepts learned in ITM 380. The course covers the hacking methodologies used to assess and attack a target computer system. Emphasis is placed on understanding attack exploits and using security tools and techniques to find and fix vulnerabilities. Students engage in offensive and defensive exercises stressing ethical hacking and penetration testing. Exercises are conducted using different operating systems and virtual environments.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ITM 350, ITM 380

ITM 490 Internship in Information and Technology Management

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with overall minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB courses.

ITM 495 Special Topics in Information and Technology Management

A course offered at the discretion of the ITM department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ITM 499 Independent Study in Information and Technology Management

A readings or independent study course taken under faculty guidance for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of department chair and associate dean.

ITM 608 Information Systems and Operations Management

For graduate students only. This course provides an integrated view of managing information systems and operations. Case studies and the SAP enterprise system are used to address key concepts. The course covers the strategic use and development of information systems as well as providing hands-on experience with enterprise systems. Emphasis is placed on managing the supply chain and its impact on strategic planning. The course addresses each element in the operation of a successful supply chain including having the right quantity, quality, location, time, price and information at each stage of the supply chain process. Both classroom and alternative instructional methods may be employed.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500.

ITM 614 Effective Project Management

For graduate students only. This course is a study of project management using the systems approach to problem solving. This course covers the nine project management knowledge areas. Contemporary project management software is used to illustrate all concepts. The course covers management of multiple projects, new product development, and large technology programs. Information-processing methods such as the Design Structure Matrix are used to analyze task dependencies. Methods for managing uncertainty in project management are covered. Students use case studies, readings and software applications to learn the sophisticated techniques and management designs used to effectively manage risk and uncertainty, financial exposure and human constraints.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500

ITM 615 Data Mining for Business

Leading companies compete on analytics. This course focuses on using data, statistical and quantitative analysis, data-mining models, and data-driven insight to support decision-making and actions. Students gain knowledge and skills to manipulate and analyze data sets. Topics include the strategic value of analytics and building analytical capabilities, relevant concepts related to data manipulation, data and text mining techniques, and business applications of data mining and analytics.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500.

ITM 617 Machine Learning for Business Analytics

This course introduces how to use apply a modern programming language in the process of data mining and business analytics. This course provides hands-on development experience where students utilize programming languages, such as Python and SQL, to process, analyze, model a variety of real-world datasets.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite or co-requisite QMB 500.

ITM 618 Application Development for Managers

This course focuses on a managerial view of the software development and programming process with a focus on secure programming, code management, data processing, and analytics. Students will undertake a detailed study of the Python programming language and associated development tools. Topics include the software development life-cycle, requirements analysis and documentation, the role of programming languages in software development, version control systems, structured programming, data structures, predictive modeling, static code analysis, and exception handling.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 619 Enterprise Systems

For graduate students only. This course examines enterprise system concepts with a focus on understanding how enterprise systems integrate information across business functional areas. Students will learn the fundamentals of a current Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) application (SAP). The use of enterprise systems at both the transaction processing level and the managerial level is covered. Case studies, business simulation, and hands-on exercises with an enterprise system are used to enhance student understanding. Configuration of an enterprise system for business processes is covered. Students will prepare a comparative analysis of two enterprise systems.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 630 Managing the IT Organization

For graduate students only. The course presents an integrated approach to managing IT organization by guiding the participant though a process of effectively aligning, investing, measuring, deploying and sustaining the strategic and tactical direction of IT organizations in 21st-century businesses. The course leverages and integrates current and emerging industry best practices, standards guidelines and leading company case studies. Students will learn how to develop and evaluate an IT management plan by studying an IT organization in a contemporary business as part of the semester-long project.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 635 Managing Innovation

For graduate students only. This course focuses on innovation's role in 21st-century organizations. It addresses the need for a systemic approach to building innovation capabilities and the challenges of integrating the many facets of innovation management. Leading innovators and building innovative organizations are covered from both a theoretical and applied approach. Topics addressed include fundamental theories of innovation; developing an innovation strategy; innovation as a business process; the role of the innovation context including leadership and organization, culture and values, people and skills, and processes and tools; and assessing and improving innovation performance.

Credit Hours: 4

ITM 650 Information Security Management

Introduces students to fundamental concepts of information security from the aspect of managing security programs for business enterprises.  The topics examined include risk management, security governance, compliance, business continuity, access control, cybercrime, physical security, critical infrastructures, network security and cryptography.  Special consideration is given to applying international standards and best practices to the development and management of organizational security programs.  Students learn about the vulnerabilities and threats facing information systems and the technology and techniques used to secure them.  Case studies of cybersecurity incidents and industry trends are addressed.  Hands-on experience with security and hacker tools is provided in a lab environment.
Credit Hours: 4

ITM 680 Big Data for Analytics

This course will provide an introduction to managing, mining, and analyzing big datasets. This course will incorporate distributed and parallel algorithms and supported systems to mine large datasets. The course will also use database technology including NoSQL databases. The final project in the course would involve mining a big dataset from a real company using the techniques learnt in the course to gain insights into real business issues.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500 and ITM 615.

Corequisites

ITM 617

ITM 689 Global Supply Chain Management

The course provides an introduction to supply chain management language, concepts, tools, and strategies and is targeted to executives and general managers. The course focuses on supply-chain strategy; therefore, the course begins with an overview of business, corporate, and global strategy. The case method is used and supplemented with lectures.
Credit Hours: 4

ITM 690 Internship in Information and Technology Management

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy up to two hours of practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval of the graduate office, the college internship coordinator and the associate dean.

ITM 695 Special Topics in Information and Technology Management

A course offered at the discretion of the ITM department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

ITM 699 Independent Study in Information and Technology Management

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in information systems and technology management.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

JOU 101 Introduction to Journalism

This course explores the role and function of journalism, its evolution throughout history, and how it is practiced in different media and in different parts of the world. The basic principles, related legal issues and ethics of journalism are also examined, with an emphasis on journalism's transition in the new media age.

Credit Hours: 4

JOU 212 Memoir and Autobiography

Students read and study diverse, outstanding examples of this genre while practicing the craft of first-person narrative. Frequent and substantial writing--done in-class and as homework--is the catalyst for self-reflection and learning nonfiction storytelling techniques: rendering scenes; portraying character; structure and narrative arc; and finding and refining the author's voice. The final project, a substantial piece of life writing, is created in component parts throughout the semester and revised through peer editing, the teacher's responses, and multiple drafts of the entire narrative.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (W)

JOU 213 Travel Writing

Students will explore the art of travel writing, using the techniques of creative nonfiction and journalism. They will learn to incorporate fact and research into pieces that include narrative, interview and reflection. They will reflect the intersection of people and places, while exploring their own relationship to the experiences. Assignments may include the critique of food, architecture and music; political analysis; and description of natural environs. May count in the humanities distribution in the Baccalaureate Core if not used for the journalism or writing major.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

JOU 221 Multimedia Storytelling

This course teaches the basics of capturing and editing sound, photographs and moving images for journalistic purposes, with a focus on producing content for the Web. Students will learn to tell multi-platform stories using simple, portable equipment and software that makes up the “tool kit” for today's versatile reporters. They also will be introduced to the ethical and legal dimensions of capturing sound and images in public spaces and to alternative storytelling techniques.

Credit Hours: 4

JOU 251 Sports Journalism

Sports and athletes-pro and college- constantly make compelling news and offer rich sources for story telling and investigation. This part of journalism has been "multimedia" since radio and TV began; in this class sports students will become adept at the diverse skills today's journalism requires, including previewing and covering games in written and visual media; blogging; and using social media. Like athletes, journalists can only get better with practice-and this class will provide students hands-on opportunities to cover sports and raise their games.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

JOU 101

JOU 271 News Reporting and Writing

This course provides a hands-on practice of journalism, in which students learn reporting and information-gathering techniques, develop interviewing skills and write frequent news stories with varying angles and subjects. Students will also learn to be fair and objective in their reporting.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and JOU 101, or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 273 Practicum in Student Publications

A supervised practical experience on a student publication. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements. Students may enroll for credit as follows: editor in chief, managing editor and section editors (up to 4 credit hours);  writers, assistant section editors and other staff (photo, video, advertising) from 1 to 2 credit hours. No student may receive more than 4 credit hours of credit in student publications in any one semester. May be repeated for a maximum of the following credit hours: Minaret, 8; Moroccan, 8; Neon, 6.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor. Not recommended for first-semester freshmen.

JOU 290 Special Topics in Journalism

Specialized study of a topic and/or area of journalism. The course may be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201.

JOU 304 Social, Digital, and Data Journalism

This course focuses on digital reporting and storytelling tools and methods, building on the training provided in Multimedia Journalism I. The latest video journalism, audio journalism, data journalism, photojournalism, web writing and social media skills will be explored, along with issues involving multimedia journalism ethics and the law.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201; JOU 221 or COM 241; and JOU 271.

JOU 336 Advanced Broadcast Journalism Field Production

This class builds upon the foundational skills introduced in COM 236 UTTV Practicum. Students will learn how to use DSLR cameras and other advanced technologies to produce TV news packages. Students will strengthen broadcast skills in conducting standups, on-camera interviews, video shooting, editing and production. Students will be required to report on topics and events affecting the broader Tampa Bay community. Classes incorporate lecture/discussion and professor guidance in project work for news packages. 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

COM 236

JOU 371 Feature Writing

An advanced journalism class that focuses on writing longer feature stories of greater complexity than the news stories in JOU 271. Involves extensive writing assignments of the kind that appears in print or online magazines. Students will study important genres in those publications and learn how to complement their own stories with additional elements, such as sidebars, forming editorial packages.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201; and JOU 101 and JOU 271, or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 390 Advanced Special Topics in Journalism

Advanced study of a topic and/or area of journalism. The course may be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 and AWR 201; JOU 271 or permission of instructor and department chair.

JOU 485 Directed Writing in Journalism

Independent study and advanced training in journalism, which could include reporting, feature writing and/or multimedia, with emphasis on flexibility and practicality of topic and focus. Reading and writing assignments are agreed upon by the individual student and professor. May be repeated if content varies. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

JOU 221, JOU 271, JOU 371.

JOU 490 Journalism Studies: Career Internship for Journalism Majors

Internships acquaint students with careers and professions in their major and demonstrate to students how their special skills can be used in these environments. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours, 4 of which may count toward the journalism major. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Permission of the student's advisor and the department chair are required.

JOU 499 Journalism Colloquium/Portfolio

This course is a requirement for journalism majors, offered in their final semesters, with the goal of preparing them for the post-graduation opportunities and challenges of the journalism craft and an industry in transition. Working professionals give workshops on best practices and the latest issues and developments in the media industries.  Students also compile and submit a portfolio of their best work (in all media) from each year of study.  A preface should include a discussion of the student's growth as a reporter, writer, and multimedia journalist.  Program faculty members evaluate portfolios and select the most distinguished for awards.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Senior standing in journalism.

JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Not open to students with 2+ years of high school Japanese. Students cannot take JPN 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

JPN 102 Elementary Japanese II

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 101 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Students cannot take JPN 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 102 (or equivalent skills). Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Students cannot take JPN 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

JPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II

Beginning Japanese with an emphasis on Japanese culture, as well as understanding and speaking Japanese in practical situations. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

JPN 201 (or equivalent skills.) Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Students cannot take JPN 101, 102, 201, or 202 concurrently.

JPN 251 Topics in Japanese

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor.

JPN 351 Topics in Japanese:

Content varies.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor.

JPN 451 Topics in Japanese

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

Consent of Instructor

LAN 100 Language and Culture

An introduction to the language and culture of the different ethnic groups in the United States. Content and emphasis vary. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only.  May be repeated when content varies.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Not open to native speakers of the language being studied.

LAN 105 Language For Travel

Designed to give students the ability to communicate on a basic level in a given language. Materials facilitate the practice of speaking and listening skills, emphasizing the situations one would encounter while traveling. Includes information about cross-cultural communication. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Not open to students with previous experience in the language being offered.

LAN 151 Topics in Language

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA) (IG) (NW) when appropriate.

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LAN 251 Topics in Language

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I

Beginning Latin with an emphasis on ancient Roman culture. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II

Beginning Latin with an emphasis on ancient Roman culture. Includes practice in reading and writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (IG)

Prerequisites

LAT 101 or equivalent skills.

LED 099 Experiences in Leadership Studies

LED 099 is designed to provide academic structure for students completing their experiential requirements to fulfill their leadership development plan. In consultation with their leadership advisor, LED 099 designates students who are pursuing the Leadership Studies minor. It also provides a record of progress toward completing their experiential activities requirements.

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

LED 200

LED 200 Introduction to Leadership Studies

This course is designed for students interested in learning more about the nature of leadership and open to any student with an interest in leadership. Over the course of the semester, we will look at leadership from the individual, group, organizational and global perspectives. The course will demonstrate the interrelatedness of an individual with the community/organization and the skills necessary for leading in a global society.

Credit Hours: 4

LED 450 Capstone in Leadership Studies

Provides an in-depth understanding of how leaders ethically mobilize resources to be effective in their roles. This course examines how power and influence are acquired, retained and used in organizations. In addition, the course explores the effect of power followers and the overall performance of the organization. Students learn through a variety of experiential exercises and case studies. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

LED 200 must be completed with a grade of D or higher. This course is for Juniors or Seniors only.

LIN 151 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 210 Basic Linguistics

An introduction to the study and description of language according to the principles of modern linguistics.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIN 217 ESOL Foundations

This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers at the undergraduate level with a knowledge base in applied linguistics; a broad understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the field of second language acquisition; and familiarity with issues in culture, cross-cultural communication, language instruction, and assessment in order to meet the educational, linguistic, and cultural needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) as mandated by the ESOL Consent Decree in the state of Florida. The course will address theoretical constructs of the field as well as exemplify research-based practical applications in the classroom for meeting the academic and communication needs of English Language Learners.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Education majors only.

LIN 251 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 310 Applied Linguistics

This course deals with principles of linguistics, methodologies employed by linguists working in linguistic variation in diverse contexts significant across social/ethnic/cultural strata and domains of interaction, and application in the professional setting. Includes, language acquisition, learning and teaching, and the psychology of language.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIN 320 Second-Language Acquisition

Students will learn about theories and research of second language acquisition.  This course is designed for students who may have an interest in teaching a second language.  Some topics covered will be language acquisition., language production and instruction.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIN 330 Introduction to Sociolinguistics

This course presents an introduction to Sociolinguistics, the discipline within the field of linguistics concerned with the systematic investigation of human language in relation to the social world.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIN 351 Topics in Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIN 451 Topics of Linguistics

Content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

LIT 117 War in Literature and Film

Explores the vicarious experience of warfare and the practical and moral problems associated with command.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 118 Fairy Tales in Cultural Contexts

This course begins by exploring 15th and 16th century fairy tales as they were recorded from oral culture. Students will then study contemporary revisions as they occur in both literature and film, examining the way contemporary writers and filmmakers challenge social and/or political conventions.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 120 Introduction to Literary Studies

This course introduces students to the foundational categories and concepts of contemporary literary studies. Students will learn about the defining features of major textual genres, as well as the key terms involved in their literary and linguistic analysis. Students will also practice key skills such as scansion, close reading, and lexical inquiry through class discussion and short essays. Course readings will include examples of major literary genres and elementary literary criticism. The course will also discuss professional preparation for humanities majors.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

Pre- or corequisite: AWR 101.

LIT 126 Literature and Film Classics

A study of the techniques, history and development of selected literature and film classics. Content may vary depending on instructor.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 140 Introduction to the Novel

An introduction to one of the most popular literary genres, the novel, with particular focus on the varied relations novelists establish between individual and society, audience and storyteller, to entertain, unsettle and inspire readers.

Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIT 150 Introduction to Poetry

This course will investigate the roots, elements and nature of poetry in an effort to make poetry a rich source of pleasure for a lifetime. We will read poetry of all types from all ages, with an emphasis on modern and contemporary.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 171 Topics in Literature

An introductory study of fiction, non-fiction, drama or poetry for majors and non-majors. May be repeated if the content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA)

LIT 200 Introduction to Shakespeare

An introduction to the plays and poems of William Shakespeare, including a survey of the texts and an introduction to the staging and poetry of the work. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the work and techniques of a great poet and playwright. For English and writing majors, it is essential. For all students, a familiarity with Shakespeare is a cornerstone of a well-rounded liberal arts education.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

LIT 222 Rebellions, Revolutions, and Reform

This course investigates literature that concerns the relationship of those in power to the people over whom they have authority and the resulting rebellions, revolutions, and reform movements.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 251 Literary History I

This course introduces students to a selection of texts drawn from periods up to the age of imperialism. It examines the beginnings and development of literary traditions in classical and vernacular languages. Methodologically, the course investigates the contexts of texts and literary movements, and analyzes their genres, questions the concept of periodization, and situates literature in its cultural and historical moment(s). 
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 252 Literary History II

This course examines texts from the age of imperialism to the present. It traces the global spread of texts through colonial networks, and investigates the literary and cultural consequences of an increasingly globalized world. Methodologically, this course investigates the contexts of texts and literary movements, and analyzes how genre forms travel, looks at periodization from a global perspective, and positions texts in their cultural and historical moments(s).
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 280 Flashpoints

This course examines past or present issues and conflicts in popular culture as they are represented in literature.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 281 Identity and Difference

This course introduces students to how texts have been used to divide people or bring them together. Students will cover major theoretical texts dealing with gender, citizenship, race, language, and ethnicity. Additional readings will be drawn from literary, legislative, and juridical primary sources that illustrate the interplay between popular media, discrimination, and empowerment. Writing assignments will ask students to apply their theoretical knowledge to explain contemporary and historical examples of oppression and liberation.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 201 World Literature I

A survey of major world authors from the ancient world through the Renaissance.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

LIT 202 World Literature II

A survey of major world authors from the 18th century to the present.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG)

LIT 206 British Literature I

A survey of major authors and literary trends up to the 18th century.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 207 British Literature II

A survey of major authors and trends from the 19th century to the present. LIT 206 is not a prerequisite for LIT 207.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 208 American Literature I

A survey of major authors and literary trends from colonial and revolutionary periods to the westward expansion.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 209 American Literature II

A survey of major authors and literary trends from the Civil War to modern times.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA)

LIT 214 Introduction to Literary Theory

This course introduces students to the shared vocabulary of humanistic scholarship that has developed from aesthetic philosophy, literary and art criticism, and cultural studies. Students will read foundational texts from these traditions and apply their methodologies to analyze contemporary cultural objects in their written work. 
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101

LIT 221 Foodways: Literature, Food, and Culture

This cultural studies course explores the intersection of food, literature, history and culture, which means it concerns the way food is represented, manipulated, sold, eaten, cooked, distributed, marketed, grown, and discussed.
Credit Hours: 4
(A)(HFA)

LIT 229 Contemporary African Literature

A survey of contemporary African authors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

LIT 233 Trauma Narratives: Africa

Students will learn to understand and explain the issues, terms and concepts involved in discussing African literature. They will be able to identify and define the basic concepts and narrative techniques of trauma literature. They will analyze selections of African fiction dealing with human-made and deliberately perpetrated traumas. They will also develop tentative conclusions about the nature and craft of African trauma narratives, how they differ from other trauma literatures and how they evolve African and postcolonial literatures. Students will lead peers in discussions on the core issues/texts of the course and write a clear, well-developed and organized essay that demonstrates rigorous critical thinking, mastery of writing skills and competence in integrating and documenting research.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW)

LIT 238 Women's Literature

This course critically examines women's writing and may incorporate a variety of genres, including fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama. The texts come from a variety of traditions, from classic texts by women writers to the avant-garde, and from a variety of historical and literary periods.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (W)

LIT 240 Contemporary Themes: Memoir

A study of selected contemporary memoir. Content will vary depending on instructor.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

LIT 257 The Contemporary Novel

A study of selected novels by major contemporary authors.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

LIT 265 History of the English Language

An introduction to the history and development of the English language through literary texts and secondary sources.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

LIT 270 Topics in Literature

A study of traditional or experimental fiction, non-fiction or poetry at the introductory level. May be repeated if the content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

LIT 285 Topics in Drama

A study of different subjects, themes, and periods in drama at the introductory level. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

LIT 300 The Romantic Writers

A study of the Romantic Movement from Blake to Keats.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 301 The Victorian Writers

A study of Victorian literature from Carlyle to Kipling.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 303 Modern Poetry

An introduction to the major poets and schools of modern and contemporary poetry in England and the United States.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 307 Shakespeare's Romances and Tragedies

An advanced study of several of Shakespeare's finest romances and tragedies, involving a close analysis of the texts and incorporating a thorough grounding in the Renaissance mindset.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 308 Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories

An advanced study of several of Shakespeare's finest comedies and history plays.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 309 Advanced Drama

Studies include Elizabethan, Restoration or contemporary drama. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 312 Contemporary World Literature

A selection of today's major living authors from around the world.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 313 Literary Genres

This course will focus on one genre or a select set of genres through which students will approach literature.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and ENG 305

LIT 314 Literary Places

Recognizing that literary production does not happen in the abstract but in specific places, this class offers an in-depth investigation of how place facilitates collaboration and dissent among authors and exerts an influence on their works. The course will focus on works from a specific place, to be chosen by the instructor, from which students will read extensively. Students will also read critical and historical material about the place. Informed by these readings, students in their written work will research some aspect of the relationship between the place and the work produced in it.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and ENG 305

LIT 318 Fiction

A study of traditional or experimental novels or short fiction. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 324 Post-Colonial Literature and Theory

This course is designed to focus on a variety of colonial and post-colonial literatures in Africa, the Caribbean, Indonesia or Latin America. It is a study of the representation of personal, racial and national identity in works from the selected region, written during the period of struggle against colonialism and afterwards. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (NW) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 325 The Eighteenth Century

Studies the major authors of the neoclassical period.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor. May be repeated if content varies.

LIT 334 The Medieval Vision

Investigation of medieval views of the world and humankind through close reading of several literary masterpieces.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 335 English Renaissance Literature

The poetry, prose and drama of England's most glorious literary period, the 16th and 17th centuries.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 337 Multiethnic U.S. Literature and Film

This course explores four major ethnic heritages - Native American, Hispanic, African American and Asian American - through contemporary literature and film. Discussion of the unique historical background casts light upon multicultural expression in literature and film. Other arts, such as dance, music and folklore, enrich our appreciation of each community's artistic identity.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (NW)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 340 Major Poets

Close reading and analysis of one or more major poets. May be repeated if content varies.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 347 Irish Literature

A study of Irish fiction, drama, poetry, memoir and film of the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes the influences of colonialism, politics, sectarianism, religion and notions of family and women's roles on this body of literature. Includes a study of major writers from the early part of the 20th century, such as James Joyce, and their influence on contemporary writers.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (IG) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 348 Sex and Seduction in the Early American Republic

This course examines sex, gender and marriage in literature of the early American republic (1775-1815) via its rogues, flirts, virgins, crossdressers, fallen women, mothers, fathers, husbands and wives. In particular, the course will be scrutinizing seduction, didacticism, gender construction and republican mother/wifehood. We will also read, write about and evaluate current scholarship concerning these issues.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 350 Topics in Literature

This is a special topics course at the 300 level. The course will incorporate an advanced study of a topic and/or genre. The course material may be from any historical period and may include any nationality, ethnicity, etc. Course may be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 360 Major Authors

An in-depth study of one or more influential writers.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and ENG 305

LIT 425 Seminar

A capstone course focused on a defined area of literary study, such as a major author, literary movement or genre. Content varies depending on instructor. Especially recommended for students going on to professional or graduate school.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 490 Literature Thesis

Students will produce advanced, research-based writing in a field of literary studies.
Credit Hours: 4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, and ENG 305

LIT 430 Literary Criticism

A study of significant contemporary literary theories. Selected approaches to literary texts may include formalist, Freudian, reader response, poststructural, cultural and new historicist criticism.

Credit Hours: 4
(A) (HFA) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 450 Topics in Literature

Deals with different subjects each time course is offered and may be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LIT 495 Directed Reading

A program of directed readings and related writing assignments agreed upon by individual students and professors. May be repeated if content varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4
(HFA)

Prerequisites

AWR 101, AWR 201, one literature course; or permission of the instructor.

LJA 204 Introduction to Law, Justice, and Advocacy

An examination of the role of laws in society, the fundamental sources of law, and the legal system and its procedures. Develops the skills for legal research, writing and analysis. Introduces the substantive areas of constitutional, contract and criminal law and torts.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

LJA 211 Legal Research and Writing

This course will introduce students to legal research and writing, general legal terminology and various legal concepts.  It will also introduce students to composing and editing legal writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

LJA 315 Appellate Advocacy

The course focuses on persuasive writing and oral advocacy. Specifically, the students will write an appellate brief and make oral arguments using a current or past hypothetical case developed by the American Collegiate Moot Court Association, resulting in an end of class mock appeal.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

LJA 204 or LJA 211

LJA 316 Trial Advocacy

The course will focus on trial advocacy, process and evidence. Students will develop strategy, organize delivery, and apply critical thinking to a case problem, resulting in an end-of-class mock trial.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

LJA 204

LJA 400 Mock Trial Tournament

This is an advanced and intense trial advocacy experience.  Students must have the approval of the assigned professor to register.  To be selected for the course, students must earn a B or better in Trial Advocacy (LJA 316) during the fall semester, and earn high scores from mock judges during an in-class, end-of-fall-semester mock trial competition. Selected students will participate in a seven-week intensive preparation for an American Mock Trial Association regional tournament (held in either February or March of the spring term). This is a pass/fail class.

Credit Hours: 4

LJA 401 Moot Court Tournament

This is an advanced and intense appellate advocacy experience. In teams of two, students develop legal arguments on a hypothetical case developed by the American Moot Court Association. Each student is responsible for both petitioner and respondent positions on an assigned constitutional issue. Over the course of the semester, students will learn Supreme Court precedent for the constitutional issues that underwrite the hypothetical case, practice oral arguments in class, and compete in a regional tournament of the AMCA. Students will be required to submit a written brief.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

LJA 315

LJA 450 Independent Study

An applied, experiential moot court or mock trial experience, which involves case-problem readings and participation in either moot court or mock trial tournaments. The course must be under the direction of a full-time LJA professor, and the subject matter will depend on the yearly national case problems devised by The American Mock Trial Association and The American Collegiate Moot Court Association.

One credit only, repeatable up to a maximum of four credits.
Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

LJA 315 or LJA 316

MAPC 601 Leadership and Professional Communication

This course is the initial experience in the Master of Arts in Professional Communication program. This course (re) acquaints students with communication theory, strategic leadership principles, and theories and praxes of professional presentation. 

Students will engage in a professional inventory of self-study that involves current work and educational practices in conjunction with study of integrated marketing-management principles as they relate to leadership of an organization, communication strategies, and interpersonal communication. These practical and theoretical endeavors will aid in the creation of professional presentation of self and work. In short, the study of communication theory of leadership will combine with projects unique to the student for a resulting excellent presentation. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 602 Global Communication Design

In this course, we focus on the fundamentals of global professional communication in both written and visual contexts. We draw from your professional and academic background to enhance your knowledge of intercultural considerations for professional correspondence. This course offers a foundation in intercultural communication, effective professional writing, and visual design. It also provides a brief grammar refresher as well as direct application to recent case studies. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 603 Organizational and Strategic Communication

This course examines the role of communication within organizations and systems of behavior. Students will study theory and its application to real life examples. Once the foundation of organizational communication is established, students will then explore strategic communication and engage in activities to help them identify best communication practices in a global world. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 604 Conflict Resolution

This course examines the role of communication during interpersonal conflict. It will train students to critically evaluate conflict situations by studying theory and then applying it via in class role plays and simulations.  From learning about sources of conflict to various types of conflict resolution strategies, students will also gain advanced communication skills.  The course includes critical analysis and application of theory to real life conflict situations. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 605 Data Analytics and Research Strategies

In this course, students will learn how to identify communication problems; form research questions and hypotheses; employ a variety of methods to collect and analyze data; report their findings and make recommendations.
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 610 Digital Communication Practice

Students will learn strategies, tactics, and tools to develop effective online content, messaging, branding, imaging, and search engine optimization to meet goals of an organization using performance measures.  Media planning and production will be based on market and audience analysis. Projects will include social media content development and curation, website production for multiple formats, video and 2-D production, augmented reality and mobile app conceptualization, and writing for online platforms and marketing reports. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 611 Emerging Technologies

Emerging Technologies and Applications is a course that studies the current and upcoming status of technologies in relation to professional communications and leadership strategies. This hands-on course will explore open source and emerging tools related to visual and aural media, immersive tools,mixed and virtual realities, alternative and embedded screens, physical computing, biosensors, trackers etc., and how those tools provide essential data on how clients and users interact with products.
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 612 Ethics and Communication Law

This course examines the role of law and ethics in communication. Topics include an overview of the American legal system, the first amendment, and other legal or ethical communication issues. Students will learn about a wide range of communication issues including communication in the digital space. By the end of the course students will be able to recognize best contemporary ethical and professional practices in communication. 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 613 Popular Communication

In this course, we focus on popular communication and contemporary issues as they relate to the field of communication and its impact on professional practice. In other words, what communication case studies and theories most impact communication practice at work, academia, family, and life? Popular communication often encompasses media and popular culture criticism. This course takes a step over and uses practices from that praxis to understand critical issues facing communication practice today. Topics include: entrepreneurship and sales communication, business communication 
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 614 Issues in Communication

MAPC 614 provides an overview of relevant issues in communication scholarship. We focus on 3 areas within the field of communication: ethics, health, and technology/globalization. These areas are separated into 3 modules with the expectation for the class to accept the challenge of locating common threads that connect the 3 as well as highlighting the distinct differences of each area of interest. Each of these 3 areas will engage a range of readings considered timely and/or foundational. Students earn a final grade based on the 3 tests they take as well as 3 papers and in-class participation
Credit Hours: 4

MAPC 700 Capstone in Professional Communication

The capstone experience is designed as the conclusive experience in the Master of Arts in Professional Communication. The capstone experience is largely independent, and students will chose a faculty advisor with whom to formulate a process and complete a project. The syllabus highlights the procedures, objectives, outcomes, and guidelines for the MAPC 700 capstone in professional communication. 

Credit Hours: 4

MAR 100 Open Water

Any student under medical care or on prescription medication must see the instructor before registering for this course. This is a PADI Open Water SCUBA course that teaches safe diving procedures and the use of diving equipment. The course involves lectures, pool sessions and two weekend days for the certification dives. Equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. Transportation is not provided for the student for the weekend dives. Laboratory fee: $150.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

Students must show swimming proficiency.

MAR 102 Advanced Open Water

Any student under medical care or on prescription medication must see the instructor before registering for this course. This is a PADI Advanced SCUBA course covering topics on navigation, deep diving (60-100 feet), boat diving and drift diving. The course involves lectures and three weekend days for the certification dives. Equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. Transportation is not provided for the student for the weekend dives. Laboratory fee: $320.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 103 Rescue Diver

Student must be current in first aid and CPR by the first week of this course. Course topics cover SCUBA-related rescue techniques and emergency procedures. The course involves lectures, pool sessions and a one-day weekend dive trip for the certification dives. Equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is only offered during the second seven weeks of the fall semester. Laboratory fee: $175.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Advanced Open Water certification (MAR 102) or equivalent valid certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 104 PADI Divemaster

Course description: Students learn how to organize and plan safe and successful dives for dive groups, and supervise students in training. PADI Divemaster certification may be applied for through PADI Headquarters after successful completion of the course requirements. The course involves lectures, pool sessions, and a minimum of two weekends of diving. Some SCUBA equipment is provided for use. It is recommended that students have all of their own diving equipment except air tanks. Course offered only during the spring semester. Laboratory fee: $320.

Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

PADI Rescue Diver certification (MAR 103). Student must have proof of 20 dives.

MAR 126 Marine Biology

Designed for non-science majors. A survey of marine biology including a discussion of the basic marine environments, natural history of marine animals, special adaptations of marine mammals, elementary marine chemistry, marine plants and their economic importance, and the impact of pollution on marine ecosystems. Partially satisfies natural science distribution requirements of the baccalaureate experience, but is not applicable toward a marine science or biology majors or minors. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

MAR 1021 Specialty Diver, part 1

This PADI diving course covers three specialty dive certifications: Enriched Air Nitrox, Peak Buoyancy and Equipment Specialist. The course involves lectures and one weekend day for the certification dives. Equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is offered only during the first seven weeks of the spring semester. Note: Specialty Diver, part 2, may be taken before Specialty Diver, part 1. Laboratory fee: $200.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification.

MAR 1022 Specialty Diver, part 2

During this course, the student completes two specific PADI specialty diver certifications: Boat Diver and Drift Diver Specialist. The course involves lectures and a two-day weekend dive trip for the certification dives. Equipment is provided, except for snorkeling equipment. This course is offered only during the second seven weeks of the spring semester. Note: Specialty Diver, part 2, may be taken before Specialty Diver, part 1. Laboratory fee: $260.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

PADI Open Water certification (MAR 100) or valid SCUBA certification from a recognized international organization (SSI, NASDS, etc.).

MAR 200 Introduction to Marine Science

This course is intended as a broad introduction to marine science that will serve as a foundation for more advanced coursework in one or more of the disciplines introduced in this course. Topics covered in this course will include: 1) the physical geology of the earth with special emphasis on ocean basins; 2) the physical properties of water as they relate to tides, currents, waves and climate modulation; 3) the chemistry of seawater with regard to dissolved elements and gasses; and 4) a broad overview of life in the oceans. May only be used to satisfy major requirements in marine-science biology, biology, or environmental science majors. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 3
(NS)

MAR 201 Origins & Evolution of the Marine Environment

This course will explore the origins and evolution of the earth (starting at the big bang/universe), the atmosphere, biology, and methodology employed to elucidate these evolutions.  Students will then apply this knowledge to modern physical and geological processes shaping the marine environment, influencing climate change, and creating the interface between the terrestrial and marine environments.  The evolution of the marine environment is an important concept as these primordial processes shaped much of what is currently studied in the oceans.  Having a clear grasp of the influence of geology, physics, and biochemistry gives insight into to modern environmental analogues.  The past is the rosetta stone to the future. 

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

MAR 200

Corequisites

MAR 201L

MAR 201L Origins & Evolution of the Marine Environment Laboratory

This course will explore the origins and evolution of the earth (starting at the big bang/universe), the atmosphere, biology, and methodology employed to elucidate these evolutions.  Students will then apply this knowledge to modern physical and geological processes shaping the marine environment, influencing climate change, and creating the interface between the terrestrial and marine environments.  The evolution of the marine environment is an important concept as these primordial processes shaped much of what is currently studied in the oceans.  Having a clear grasp of the influence of geology, physics, and biochemistry gives insight into to modern environmental analogues.  The past is the rosetta stone to the future. 

Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

MAR 200

Corequisites

MAR 201

MAR 222 Marine Ecology

Studies the interactions between marine organisms and their biotic and abiotic ocean environment, including an investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms in the sea, the causes of these patterns and the roles of these species in marine ecosystems. The course and its companion laboratory address marine systems from an experimental perspective with an emphasis on experimental design, statistical data analysis, quantitative skills and techniques in scientific writing. Two weekend field trips are required.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 222L

MAR 222L Marine Ecology Laboratory

Studies the interactions between marine organisms and their biotic and abiotic ocean environment, including an investigation of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms in the sea, the causes of these patterns, and the roles of these species in marine ecosystems. The course and its companion laboratory address marine systems from an experimental perspective with an emphasis on experimental design, statistical data analysis, quantitative skills, and techniques in scientific writing. Two weekend field trips are required.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 222

MAR 226 Marine Invertebrate Zoology

A study of the taxonomy, ecology and behavior of marine invertebrates. Examines local fauna and habitats through field-oriented studies. Requires some Saturday field trips.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 226L

MAR 226L Marine Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory

A study of the taxonomy, ecology and behavior of marine invertebrates. Examines local fauna and habitats through field-oriented studies. Requires some Saturday field trips.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 226

MAR 301 Physical Oceanography

A study of the physical properties of seawater, global heat balance, hydrodynamics, ocean currents, waves, tides, and underwater sound and optics. Lecture only.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS)

Prerequisites

Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHY 201 or PHY 206

MAR 310 Biological Oceanography

Introduction to marine organisms, factors controlling their distribution and abundance, and the adaptations to and interactions with their environment. This course will emphasize the importance of trophic interactions in biogeochemical cycling, carbon flow, productivity and climate control. At least one weekend field excursion will be required.
Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category III)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, MAR 200

Corequisites

MAR 310L

MAR 310L Biological Oceanography Laboratory

Introduction to marine organisms, factors controlling their distribution and abundance, and the adaptations to and interactions with their environment. This course will emphasize the importance of trophic interactions in biogeochemical cycling, carbon flow, productivity and climate control. At least one weekend field excursion will be required.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum, MAR 200

Corequisites

MAR 310

MAR 327 Marine Botany

Studies the ecology, physiology and communities of marine primary producers with emphases on Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Topics explored are phytoplankton, benthic macroalgae, mangroves, seagrass and saltmarsh communities.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 327L

MAR 327L Marine Botany Laboratory

Studies the ecology, physiology and communities of marine primary producers with emphases on Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Topics explored are phytoplankton, benthic macroalgae, mangroves, seagrass and saltmarsh communities.
Credit Hours: 0

Prerequisites

Biology lower-core curriculum and MAR 200.

Corequisites

MAR 327

MAR 344 Coral Reefs

This course examines coral reef ecosystems, including their biology, ecology, geologic setting, chemical and physical characteristics and the impact of global climate change on this ecosystem type. Immediately after the end of the spring semester, students will participate in a 14-day study abroad experience at the Roatan Institute of Marine Sciences on the island of Roatan in Honduras.

Credit Hours: 4
(NS) (Category II)

Prerequisites

BIO 198, BIO 198L, BIO 199, and BIO 199L, permission of instructor; MAR 100 or its equivalent is required

MAT 150 Introductory Algebra

A study of the basic concepts of algebra such as first-degree equations, factoring, rational expressions, graphing, quadratic equations, exponents and radicals. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.

Credit Hours: 4

MAT 155 Finite Mathematics for Liberal Arts

Appropriate as a general distribution requirement for liberal arts students. Topics include graph theory, planning and scheduling, data collection, descriptive statistics, social choices and voting, the problem of fair division, and the study of size and shape.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

MAT 160 College Algebra

Topics include functions and their graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and matrices.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 150 or equivalent.

MAT 170 Precalculus

Covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometric functions and polar coordinates.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent.

MAT 180 College Geometry

This course covers the basic concepts of geometry to include properties of geometric shapes, transformations, similarity, problem solving and proof writing. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent

MAT 201 Introduction to Statistics

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, with applications in various disciplines using statistical computer software. May not be used to satisfy general distribution requirements of the Baccalaureate Experience.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 155 or equivalent (or higher).

MAT 225 Calculus for Business

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental components of differential and integral calculus, with a particular emphasis on those aspects of calculus that have applications to business. The course covers exponential and logarithmic functions, limits, differentiation and differentiation techniques, applications of the derivative (e.g., marginal cost, marginal revenue, rate of growth), anti-derivatives, the integral as an area, functions of several variables, and partial derivatives.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 160 or equivalent.

MAT 260 Calculus I

Covers limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of derivatives, integration, and integration by substitution.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 170 with a grade of "C" or higher, or equivalent.

MAT 261 Calculus II

Covers integration techniques and applications, parametric and polar curves, sequences and infinite series.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 260 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 262 Calculus III

Covers vectors in two and three dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integration and vector calculus.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 270 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

This course is designed for majors in computer science. It covers basic aspects of discrete mathematics that are fundamental to digital computing. Topics include sets and relations, numbers and sequences, mathematical logic, elementary combinatorics, graph theory, and related algorithms.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 260 Calculus I

MAT 271 Computational Linear Algebra

Covers linear equations, matrices and determinants. Vector spaces and linear transformations. Inner products and eigenvalues. Emphasizes computational aspects of linear algebra and applications.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 or equivalent

MAT 272 Applied Statistics

This course provides the basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics, with applications in various disciplines. It gives the insight into how a statistician gathers, summarizes, and draws conclusions from real life data. This course covers the basics of statistical testing, regression analysis, experimental design, analysis of variance, and use of statistical software (especially R) to analyze data.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 225 or MAT 260 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 285 Programming with Mathematical Applications

This course teaches programming fundamentals such as program design and modularity, with an emphasis on mathematical applications. Mathematical fields from which problems will be drawn include number theory, linear algebra, statistics, differential equations, multivariable calculus and modeling.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 with a grade of "C" or higher

MAT 299 Introduction to Higher Mathematics

Covers proof techniques, basic set theory, relations and partitions, functions and cardinality.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 262 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 300 Differential Equations

Covers first-order differential equations with applications, higher-order differential equations with applications, systems of differential equations and numerical solutions of differential equations.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 262 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 301 Discrete Mathematics

Covers sets, induction, algorithms, recursion, matrices, relations, functions, digraphs, partially ordered sets, lattices, Boolean algebra, switching circuits, trees and combinatorial analysis.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 308 Linear Algebra

Covers systems of equations, matrices, vectors spaces and subspaces, dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 310 Probability

The main objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to probability and its applications. Basic ideas of probability and random variables, discrete probability functions, continuous probability densities, joint distributions, transformation of random variables, moments, and moment generating functions of random variables, and limit theorems will be discussed.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 262 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 311 Financial Mathematics

This course provides an understanding of the fundamental concepts of financial mathematics. Topics covered: interest rate measurement, time value of money, annuities, loan payment, bond, general cash flows and portfolios (yield curves, rates of return, and measures of duration and convexity), cash flow matching and immunization, and interest rate swaps.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 261 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 401 Real Analysis

Covers the theory of limits, continuity, differentiation and integration.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 402 Applied Regression Analysis

This course provides the basic understanding of regression analysis and its application in real life. The course focuses on both theory and application of simple and multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. Topics covered are correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, model assumptions, parameter estimation, inference on regression model and parameters, regression diagnostic, model selection, multicollinearity, linear models with qualitative predictors, logistic regression, polynomial regression, and introduction to time series analysis. Students are required to analyze real-life datasets using statistical software.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 310 or equivalent

MAT 410 Complex Analysis

Covers complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 414 Actuarial Mathematics P

Actuarial Mathematics P is intended for, but not limited to actuarial science majors. The course covers the basic principles of insurance and risk management and introduces students to the actuarial profession. Students learn most of the content of Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam P in Probability course. This course has a problem-solving approach, where probability theory is applied to solve problems related to quantitative assessment of risk and prepare students for SOA Exam P.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MAT 310 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 415 Actuarial Mathematics FM

Actuarial Mathematics FM is intended for, but not limited to actuarial science majors. Students learn most of the content of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam FM in Financial Mathematics course. This course, in particular, has a problem-solving approach, where mathematics is applied to solve problems related to topics of interest theory, and prepares students for SOA Exam FM. 
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MAT 311 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 420 Modern Abstract Algebra

Covers the theory of groups, rings and fields.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 425 Mathematical Statistics

Mathematical Statistics is intended, but not limited to mathematics and actuarial science majors. This course focuses on inferential statistics and the theory of estimation. It covers several different methods of estimation, including the method of moments and the method of maximum likelihood. Students will become familiar with the construction of confidence intervals for unknown parameters, and construction of hypothesis tests via the likelihood ratio.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MAT 272 and MAT 310 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MAT 450 Independent Study

Involves independent study directed by a full-time mathematics faculty member on a topic agreed upon by the faculty member and the student. May be repeated for credit if subject matter varies.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Consent of department chair.

MAT 490 Senior Seminar

An in-depth study of a topic in mathematics or mathematical programming. Requires consultation with a faculty member, personal research, library research and an oral presentation.

Credit Hours: 1

Prerequisites

Senior standing in mathematics or mathematical programming. Must have completed at least four (4) mathematics courses numbered MAT 300 or above. Permission of the department chair required.

MAT 491 Undergraduate Research in Mathematics

This course provides a research experience in different topics of mathematics. Students select a specific research topic to investigate in collaboration with the instructor. The research work culminates with a presentation at an undergraduate conference, and optionally a publication.
Credit Hours: 2

Prerequisites

MAT 299 with a grade of "C" or higher. If the class is taken in place of MAT 490, then the student must have completed at least four (4) mathematics courses numbered MAT 300 or above.

MAT 495 Internship in Mathematics

This internship exposes the student to a real-life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The internship might be paid or unpaid, for a variable number of credit hours (1-4).  A student should work 56 hours for one credit hour. The internship should be in the actuarial field or other math-related fields, previously approved by the instructor.
Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing with a GPA of 2.25 or higher.

MAT 499 Selected Topics

Subject may be chosen from point-set topology, partial differential equations, combinatorics, graph theory or other topics.

Credit Hours: 1-4

MGT 330 Principles of Management

This course studies the evolution and practice of the core management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A strong emphasis on leadership skills is integrated into the course content to provide the student with a framework with which to translate classroom theory and practice into individual and team performance in the accomplishment of organizational objectives.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 with a "C" or better, AWR 201, and COB requirements for taking 300-level courses.

MGT 340 Human Resource Management

This course analyzes the acquisition, development and retention of human resources to accomplish the organization's strategic objectives appropriately, efficiently and economically. This course provides an overview of the functional areas within HRM and further examines the ethical and legal environment relevant to HRM, contemporary health and safety responsibilities and trends, and labor unions. Additionally, the course surveys social, legal, and ethical international HRM issues.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 330 and all prerequisites for MGT 330.

MGT 345 Organizational Behavior

This course examines how individual differences, group characteristics, and organizational culture influence people’s behaviors in organizations. The course is organized around these three levels of analysis—individual, group, and organization—and highlights a number of skill areas required for managers to be effective in a diverse organizational setting.  Essential skill areas covered in this course address diversity and inclusion, team-building, communication, motivation, conflict and conflict resolution, and ethical leadership.
Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MGT 330 and all prerequisites for MGT 330.

MGT 350 International Management

This course discusses the complexities of conducting business across borders and illustrates the unique challenges faced in international management, including the cultural, political, legal, and economic environment in the home and host country. It offers a managerial perspective of the strategies employed by companies to grow their businesses in the global marketplace and discusses the impact of culture in managing and leading in an international context
Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

MGT 330 and all prerequisites for MGT 330.

MGT 355 The Art and Science of Negotiation

This course focuses on the development of problem-solving and communication competencies relevant to a broad spectrum of negotiation settings from personal relationships to the global business environment. Students learn useful analytical frameworks to understand the effect of content and communication skills on the negotiation process and outcomes. Through the use of extensive role-playing, students have the opportunity to practice an array of negotiation techniques and to develop their communication and problem-solving skills.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MGT 330 and all prerequisites for MGT 330.

MGT 360 Sustainable Development: A New Business Paradigm

In a world of exploding population growth, diminishing natural resources, changing climate and instantaneous worldwide communications, businesses are being held to increasingly higher performance standards by increasingly larger numbers of stakeholders. Today's business leaders are responsible for the firms' financial, social, and environmental performance - the "triple-bottom line." Using management tools in sustainability and sustainable development, students will be able to analyze business environments and develop corporate strategies that are responsive to the multiple stakeholders of the firm. Students will analyze sustainable business practices and identify best practices in the field.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and junior standing.

MGT 365 Business Strategies for Emerging and the Base of the Pyramid Markets

Emerging and bottom of the pyramid (BOP) markets represent almost 90 percent of the world's population and offer great opportunities for businesses, and even greater challenges. This course describes the nature of emerging and BOP markets. Students will examine case studies that describe the innovation required of companies as they enter these marketplaces as well as the institutional voids inherent in these markets, voids that must be recognized and overcome in order for companies to be successful. Strategies for emerging and BOP markets will also be discussed and analyzed by students during the course of the semester.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW)

Prerequisites

ECO 204, ECO 205 and junior standing.

MGT 370 Leadership and Change Management

When companies that get in front of change, they have a significant competitive advantage.  Moreover, today’s business environment demands a compressed time frame for initiatives, especially for entrepreneurial ventures.  Unfortunately, 70% of change programs fail due to poor conceptualization or poor execution.  Effective leadership is the key to success.  This course prepares students to lead and manage change in today’s dynamic business world.  Students explore change management frameworks and practices, applying their knowledge to real-world situations and leadership challenges.  Upon completion of this course, students will understand the leadership required to be successful in introducing and implementing change.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

LED 200 or MGT 330 or with permission of instructor.

MGT 431 Practical Strategic Assessment

Not open to graduate students. This course focuses on the application of strategic management skills and the knowledge gained from prior coursework. Students analyze an organization's situation, recognize strategic issues and make recommendations. The course utilizes a group project to challenge students' skills in critical thinking, speaking, writing, teamwork, and the ability to apply theory to real-world situations.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

Senior standing, BUS 221, ITM 220, FIN 310, MGT 330, MKT 300, and all prerequisites for the aforementioned courses.

MGT 450 Born Global: International Entrepreneurship & Strategy

This course combines concepts from entrepreneurship and strategic management and applies them to international ventures, teaching students the intricacies of founding and managing firms that are "born global".
 
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Senior standing, all required 100-level and 200-level COB courses, MGT 330, and all prerequisites of the aforementioned courses

MGT 490 Management Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MGT 330, junior or senior standing and either a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a GPA of 3.0 in COB courses.

MGT 492 Learning by Travel: Management and Leadership

By traveling internationally, this course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop leadership and management skills in a global context. The course examines the role of national cultural dimensions on behaviors related to leadership and management. The course focuses on developing important skills in global context including: communication, team building, motivation, and creativity.
Credit Hours: 4

MGT 495 Special Topics in Management

A course offered at the discretion of the management department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MGT 499 Independent Study in Management

A readings or independent studies course taken for variable credit. May not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and COB associate dean.

MGT 500 Foundations of Management

This course covers theories and practices for successfully managing organizations and people. You will be introduced to a variety of concepts, assessments, tools and techniques that are important for understanding the changing business environment; elements of decision-making and strategic planning; methods of organizing including recruiting, selecting, training and developing; and procedures for controlling resources to improve productivity and results.
Credit Hours: 2

MGT 598 Leadership and Organizational Behavior

For graduate students only. This course engages students to understand how people behave in organizations wilh an emphasis on building a leader's perspective. Students explore models related to organizational behavior, including motivation, communication, culture, and team building.  Students will also examine leadership concepts, including trust, power, diversity, ethics and their own personal leadership style and potential. Through experiential learning, readings and analyses, students develop an understanding ol these concepts and how to utilize  this body of knowledge to inspire others to achieve organizational goals. This class begins with an intensive weekend workshop involving a comprehensive business simulation.
Credit Hours: 4

MGT 615 Strategic Management

For graduate students only. This is the capstone course for the MBA. It focuses on business-unit and corporate-level strategy formulation and implementation. Through readings, case analyses and participation in the Strategic Analysis Program (SAP) field study project involving a local organization, students will apply the ideas, tools, concepts and knowledge gained from previous coursework to real-world problems.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

ACC 610, FIN 611, MGT 598 and MKT 610.

Corequisites

Pre or Co-requisite: ECO 640 and ITM 608

MGT 650 Nonprofit Management: Thinking Strategically

This course develops context for social enterprise and nonprofit strategic planning. It includes a historic overview of the innovative development of nonprofit organizations, a study of the environmental elements in society that affect nonprofit organizations, orientation and success, discussion of the role of boards in planning, the means for developing effective partnerships and a template for strategic planning. The course will include an application-oriented capstone exercise.

Credit Hours: 3

MGT 659 Nonprofit Management: Leadership and Innovation

This course is the final in the four-week course sequence for the Nonprofit Management and Innovation certificate program. The week has two major segments: leadership and innovation. The leadership portion will help students to identify and assess their leadership potential and evaluate team roles and contributions. The second theme of the week, innovation, is designed to help students formulate an understanding of innovation and social entrepreneurship. The capstone project will tie together the two themes by requiring each group to conduct a feasibility study that identifies an innovative idea and develops an implementation plan that conceptualizes the role of strategic leadership.

Credit Hours: 3

MGT 689 Cross-Cultural Management and Negotiations

This course addresses practical skills for global managers by covering broad management issues as applied to specific skill areas. The latter include establishing credibility, building relationships, obtaining information, evaluating people, giving and receiving feedback, training and development, meeting management, sales and marketing, negotiation, and conflict resolution. Beyond such person-to-person skills, global organization development and consulting skill areas such as multicultural team building, knowledge transfer, innovation, and change management are also covered.
Credit Hours: 4

MGT 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval of the graduate office, the college internship coordinator, and the associate dean.

MGT 691 Strategic Management in a Global Environment

In our globalized economy, every company is influenced by trends in international business. Even small localized companies must acknowledge that employees, customers, vendors, competitors, and prices are subject to pressures from international markets. This course focuses on business-unit and corporate level strategy formulation in a global context.  Readings, cases, and lectures are presented from a senior management point of view and students are expected to demonstrate a cross-functional perspective for thinking strategically about managing organizations across borders.

Credit Hours: 4

MGT 692 Learning by Travel: Managing in International Markets

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop personal familiarity with the global environment and some of the issues faced by global managers. Beyond the social and cultural dimensions that the residency explores, the course will focus on developing an increased understanding of global markets, competition and business opportunities.
Credit Hours: 4

MGT 695 Special Topics in Management

A course offered at the discretion of the management department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MGT 699 Independent Study in Management

For graduate students only.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

minimum 3.5 GPA and written permission of the department chair.

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing

Studies the interacting business activities designed to plan, price, promote and distribute want-satisfying products and services to present and potential customers. Incorporates current developments in marketing to acquaint students with the present-day challenges of marketing activities.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

AWR 101 with a "C" or better and ECO 204.

Corequisites

BAC 100

MKT 352 Services Marketing and Management

This course is designed to address the distinct needs and problems of service organizations in the area of marketing. Services management is also addressed, exposing students to the unique operations, human resources, and promotional elements implicit in running a service firm. New service development is the final step, as the class culminates in the conceptualization of a brand new service offering along with a completed service marketing plan.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 354 Buyer Behavior

A study of the behavioral science concepts applicable to the consumer decision-making process, such as personality, perception, and group and cultural influences. Emphasis is on how these concepts and characteristics can be used by marketers to develop more effective relationships and strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 360 Marketing Research

A methodological approach to marketing and consumer research problems and opportunities, using both primary and secondary research. Examines the information needs of marketing managers and the use of information for making effective marketing decisions. Covers the marketing research process, including research design, analysis and interpretation, and reporting of findings.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 210 (or equivalent statistics course) and MKT 300.

MKT 362 Digital Marketing

Designed to introduce students to digital marketing theory and practical application. It provides a detailed understanding of relevant digital marketing channels and platforms to include Owned, Paid and Earned Digital Media.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 300

MKT 371 Professional Selling and Sales Management

Examines the personal selling process and the use of a professional, customer-oriented, problem-solving approach in selling situations. Studies the nature of the sales job, selection of salespeople, sales training programs, and issues in the compensation, supervision, motivation, and ethical challenges of salespeople.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

Corequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 372 Retail and Distribution Management

Explores the dynamics of retailing and the range of firms that make up the retailing industry. Examines the functions, practices and organizations of various store types. Focuses, through current articles, on those retailers who hold leadership positions in key retailing disciplines such as customer service, operations management and TQM, market orientation, technology, research and development, human resources, e-commerce, and promotions. Examines the future of retailing, international retailing, future trends and their impact on retailers, and the impact of e-commerce.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 410 Global Marketing

Not open to graduate students. Prepares students for the global marketing environment by examining marketing in other countries, the marketing implications of cultural and environmental differences, international marketing research, and adaptation of product, price, promotion and distribution decisions to the foreign environment.

Credit Hours: 4
(W) (IG)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 411 Promotion and Branding Strategies

Focuses on integrated marketing communications and branding strategies, with coverage of advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, branding and social media. Studies the development of integrated communications plans for organizations. Also for students minoring in advertising.

Credit Hours: 4
(W)

Prerequisites

MKT 300.

MKT 418 Advanced Professional Selling

This course introduces advanced selling topics. Students will have the opportunity to enhance their professional selling skills through advanced instruction, skill development, and practice. Emphasis will be placed on business-to-business selling situations, presentations, demonstrations, adaptive selling, negotiation, extensive role playing and sales call competitions.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 371.

MKT 450 Marketing Strategy

Develops students' ability to use facts in the analysis of marketing strategy. A capstone course that serves as a vehicle for the application and integration of the concepts, analytical tools and problem-solving approaches taught in lower-level marketing courses.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

Completion of eight hours of marketing courses.

MKT 490 Marketing Internship

This internship exposes the student to a real life learning experience. Students are hired by an organization for the specific objective of gaining work experience in that organization. The paid or unpaid internship position should be relevant to the student's major, and is worked out between the organization and the student. Completion of this internship helps students partially attain the following goals of the College of Business. May not be used to satisfy major requirements. Approval of the department chair required.

Credit Hours: 1-8

Prerequisites

MKT 300, junior or senior standing and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a 3.0 in COB.

MKT 495 Special Topics in Marketing

A course offered at the discretion of the marketing department. Subject may focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field, or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MKT 499 Independent Study in Marketing

A readings and independent studies course taken for variable credit.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Minimum 3.0 GPA, consent of the department chair and associate dean.

MKT 500 Introduction to Marketing

For graduate students only. Studies the interacting business activities designed to plan, price, promote, and distribute want-satisfying products and services to present and potential customers. Incorporates current development in marketing to acquaint students with the present-day challenges of marketing activities.

Credit Hours: 2

MKT 610 Strategic Marketing Analysis

For graduate students only. Focuses on the rapidly evolving concepts and analytical techniques that facilitate strategic plan development using interactive simulations and real-world case studies. Topics include analytical prerequisites for planning, formal strategic planning methods, the delivery of high levels of customer values, measurement of marketing metrics, and applicable research techniques in the context of marketing management.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

MKT 612 Business Research Methods

For graduate students only. This course demonstrates a logical approach to marketing and business research by focusing on the process of research and examining information needs of marketing managers. Primary and secondary research tools, survey design and analysis techniques, and methods of interpreting and reporting results are examined.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 613 Global Marketing

For graduate students only. This course prepares students for the global marketing environment by examining marketing in other countries; the marketing implications of cultural and environmental differences; international marketing research; and adaptation of product, price, promotion, and distribution decisions to the foreign environment.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 614 Professional Selling and Sales Management

For graduate students only. This course introduces the sales process and the use of professional, customer-oriented problem-solving approaches in business-to-business selling situations. Through case analysis, professional sales role-plays, developmental coaching, and presentations, students apply various sales strategies. The course also reviews best practices to effectively manage and lead a sales team.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 617 Marketing Analytics

Businesses today have access to an increasingly large amount of consumer data that they can utilize to develop marketing strategies to better meet customer needs and outperform competition.  In this class, you will learn the marketing strategies and theories that guide these strategic marketing decisions as well as the data analysis tools that will deliver you the insights you need to drive your company forward. This course is very application-oriented relying primarily on projects, cases and data sets to reach the overall course objectives.
Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

QMB 500

MKT 650 Nonprofit Management: Marketing, Research and Communication

The Nonprofit Management and Innovation program was developed against a backdrop of increasing national concern over nonprofit executive succession, fills a unique niche among area college and university programs, and responds to interests expressed by Tampa Bay nonprofit and foundation leaders. This course covers marketing, research, and communication.

(Open only to Nonprofit students.)

 

Credit Hours: 3

MKT 652 Services Marketing and Management

For graduate students only. This course focuses on developing and managing the service encounter across different industries, including the nonprofit sector, in order to deliver service quality to the customer. In this course students learn the unique challenges of services and the different roles both employees and customers have in the creation and delivery of services. Students will be able to develop measures of service quality, research and anticipate customer expectations, design new services and create service recovery strategies.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 654 Strategic Brand Management

For graduate students only. Studies the important role of creating, building and managing an organization's branding strategy. The course integrates the theoretical foundation of brand strategy with contemporary readings on branding practice. Coursework involves discussion, case analysis and projects with a high level of student interaction.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 656 Digital Marketing

This course explores, from the strategic perspective, the unique marketing challenges and opportunities that electronic marketing presents.  It requires a fundamental grounding in the principles of marketing.  It explores the nexus between e-marketing and traditional marketing activities.  The class incorporates current developments in electronic marketing to acquaint students with the present day e-marketing strategic business models. Students will also learn how to develop and implement the 4Ps in the electronic marketing context.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 657 Buyer Behavior

For graduate students only. The course introduces a wide range of behavioral concepts, and explores the strategic implications of customer behavior for marketers. The course challenges students to explore the realities and implications of buyer behavior in traditional and e-commerce markets. Key to the course is demonstrating how an understanding of buyer behavior can help to improve strategic decision making.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 658 Sport Marketing

This course addresses various marketing issues that are important to sport marketers. Primarily explored are 1) the marketing of sports events, teams, equipment and sports service providers, and 2) the use of sports to market goods and services. Sport marketers must understand business principles and understand how value is created through marketing programs tied to athletes, team, leagues, fans and organizations. Topics covered include licensing, sponsorship, distribution, services marketing, products bundling, consumer behavior and communication. The class consists of lectures, guest speakers, class discussions and individual assignments relevant with current industry practices and trends.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 500 and ECO 500.

Corequisites

MKT 610.

MKT 689 Global Marketing Strategy

Building on the fundamentals of marketing, this course introduces the context of the global environment. The course first examines the cultural, social, legal, political, financial and geographic dimensions of the global marketplace. Using primarily qualitative methodologies, the course then assesses the impact and integration of global factors in marketing programs and strategies. Topics of particular emphasis include marketing strategies in developed nations, marketing in emerging economies, international differences in consumer behavior, entry strategies in foreign markets, international branding strategies and issues, international communication strategies, and understanding the implications for implementation, monitoring and control of the international marketing planning process.
Credit Hours: 4

MKT 690 Internship

International students must consult with the Office of International Programs. May be used to satisfy practicum requirements.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

Approval by the graduate office, the college internship coordinator and the COB associate dean.

MKT 692 Learning by Travel: Marketing in International Markets

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop personal familiarity with the global environment and some of the issues faced by global managers. Beyond the social and cultural dimensions that the residency explores, the course will focus on developing an increased understanding of global markets, competition and business opportunities.
Credit Hours: 4

MKT 695 Special Topics in Marketing

For graduate students only. This course is offered at the discretion of the marketing department. Subject will focus on a topic of current interest in the field, training in a specific area of the field or a topic that is of interest to a particular group of students.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

To be specified at time of offering.

MKT 699 Independent Study in Marketing

For graduate students only. Contemporary topics in marketing.

Credit Hours: 1-4

Prerequisites

minimum 3.5 GPA, MKT 610 and written permission of the department chair.

MKT 700 Marketing Capstone

For graduate students only. This is the capstone course for the MS-Marketing program. This course integrates and applies marketing frameworks and methodologies to solve real world problems. The course is designed to be comprehensive in using, business research, marketing models and critical-thinking skills. Through a client-based project, students will apply the tools and concepts learned throughout their program.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites

MKT 610, MKT 612. Pre-requisite or Co-requisite MKT 614.

MSL 101 Leadership and Personal Development

Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness and stress management relate to leadership, officership and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining an overall understanding of the ROTC program and its advantages for the student. All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory course to fulfill Army commissioning requirements. Participation in MSL 101 does not include military obligation.

Credit Hours: 2

MSL 102 Introduction to the Profession of Arms

Discusses leadership fundamentals such as problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership, values, attributes, skills and actions in the context of practical, hands-on and interactive exercises. All cadets must take a Leadership Laboratory c