Catalog 2021-2022

300

HIS 300 The Modern Middle East and North Africa

This course examines the Modern Middle East and North Africa from the 1500's to the era of modern revolutions and recent conflicts.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

One prior HIS course

HIS 302 Revolutionary Europe 1712 to 1919

Revolutionary thought and action in Europe from the birth of Jean-Jacques Rousseau to the death of Rosa Luxemburg. This course examines revolutionary ideas, groups, and individuals, from the French Revolution to the Russian Revolution and post-WWI Europe. Students will develop their abilities to write essays analyzing the ideas of the women and men who shaped Europe in the revolutionary era.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

Any two HIS courses, including one of the following: HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 202, HIS 203.

HIS 304 History of Florida

The objectives of this course are to develop historical analysis beyond the level of the lower-division survey and to introduce students to experiential learning within the arena of local history practice. Students should master the historiography that structures the study of Florida’s past, gaining an awareness of how, over time, political history, social history, spatial theory and transnational studies have altered state history. Student research topics will be drawn from local history sources and celebrations, encouraging community engagement as well as independent analysis.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 305 The Ancient World

HIS 305 surveys the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean world from the prehistory to the fall of the Roman Empires. Students will learn about the rise and fall of ancient and classical civilizations, their political and social institutions, their economic and trade practices, their religions and cultural traditions. Readings will be extensive and include text, scholarly articles, primary sources, art and archeology. This is a writing intensive class and students will be expected to produce papers in style of historical writing.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

One History course

HIS 306 The Middle Ages

A study of European society from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 308 Renaissance and Reformation

A study of the origins, progress, interrelationships and impact of new forms and ideas that characterized the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe from 1400 to 1650.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 317 China's Revolutionary Twentieth Century

This course examines China’s revolutionary century with a particular emphasis on four definitive events: the Boxer Rebellion (1900), the Communist revolution (1934-1949), the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) and the 1989 Democracy Movement. It explores both the cause and course of these revolutions, how they become embedded in cultural memory and the ways in which they shaped state-society power relationships.

Credit Hours: 4
(NW) (SS) (W)

HIS 320 Museums, Historic Sites and Archives

This course offers an introduction to the methods and approaches that structure the presentation of history in public venues, including museums, historic venues and archives. Tools that facilitate collaboration between historians and communities to preserve local memory will also be examined. Finally, we will explore critically the political, financial and professional pressures that have shaped some of the most prominent displays of the nation’s past as well as the pressures that structure representations of history in Tampa. Students will attempt to reconcile these concerns by crafting exhibition proposals that would allow a local museum to engage multiple history publics.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

HIS 321 Revolutionary America

A study of the history of the United States before, during and after the Revolutionary War. Focuses on the role of ideology and the patterns of change in religion, racial relations and the status of women.

Credit Hours: 4
(SS) (W)

HIS 322 Spanish Caribbean and its Diasporas

This course surveys the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic) from the Taino world of the pre-Columbian period to today. Topics include the creation of colonial plantation societies and the rise of sugar and coffee economies; movements for abolition, reform, and national self-determination; the persistence of Caribbean borderlands in the U.S. gulf south; the Caribbean’s neo-imperial economies, social structures, and political institutions; the impact of the Cuban Revolution; and the Caribbean’s tourist trade and diasporas in the global economy.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

HIS 323 Age of Revolutions in the Americas

A comparative study of the revolutions and independence movements that swept the Americas between 1776 and 1826, focusing on the American, Haitian, and Latin American Revolutions. Topics include the political, economic, social, and cultural changes experienced by white, black, and indigenous Americans.
Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS)

Prerequisites

One History course

HIS 325 Narcotic Drugs and Modern Society

This course explores the history of narcotic drugs and modern society, focusing on America. The course also examines the history of U.S. drug policy.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS)

HIS 326 The History of U.S. Foreign Relations

Studies the formulation of American foreign policy and issues in American diplomatic history.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (SS) (W)

HIS 332 Imperialism and Nationalism in Asia and Africa

This course examines the British rule in India as a case study of how imperial rule is imposed and maintained, and the Indian independence movement as a model of colonial resistance.  It then examines the different imperial systems imposed on Africa, the struggle by African colonies for self-determination, and their search for identity and stability after independence.

Credit Hours: 4
(IG) (NW) (SS) (W)

Prerequisites

AWR 201

HIS 335 U.S. Constitutional History

This class broadly surveys the chronological span of U.S. Constitutional history, from the 18th century to the 1970s, studying Supreme Court decisions and dissenting opinions as primary documents that can be used to understand the past. Students will determine how relationships between people and legal regimes changed over time, and they will assess the ways that specific political, economic, social and cultural contexts affected the development of American constitutional thought, the role of the Supreme Court and the evolving relations between law and society.
Credit Hours: 4
(SS)

Prerequisites

One History survey course (HIS 102, HIS 103, HIS 202 or HIS 203)